TIME celebrity

Ryan Gosling Becomes Even More Attractive When Attempting an Australian Accent

The actor made a cameo at a recent Australian awards show

Stars: they’re just like us! In the sense that they also embarrass themselves with goofy attempts at foreign accents. Take Ryan Gosling, who tried to talk like an Aussie as he crashed Russell Crowe’s speech at the recent Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards.

The two actors “attended” the ceremony through a live feed from the Los Angeles set of their upcoming film, The Nice Guys. The movie takes place during the 1970s, and it totally shows, because Gosling and Crowe are rocking some serious retro looks.

“G’day folks, how ya going,” Gosling says, attempting to fit in with all the Aussies in the crowd. It’s a pretty terrible accent, but he’s Ryan Gosling so he makes it charming.

“It’s okay, I’m honorary Australian,” he then assues Crowe. “I lived in New Zealand for like, two years.”

(h/t Elle)

TIME Food & Drink

Starbucks Is Making a Special Seahawks Frappuccino for the Super Bowl

The Seahawks Frappuccino debuts Friday in honor of the team playing in the Super Bowl. Starbucks

The beverage is blue and green in honor of the team's colors

Seahawks fans in Washington and Oregon now have one more high-calorie way to cheer on their team at the Super Bowl this weekend: with a Seahawks-themed Frappuccino.

Seattle-based Starbucks announced that the beverage was invented by an employee in Kent, Wash., who added blueberries to a vanilla bean crème Frappuccino, then topped it with green tea matcha-infused whip cream, reflecting the team’s colors.

Fans can get the drink at participating stores in those two states from Friday through Monday. But should the Seahawks lose the game, it’s hard to imagine the drink will be too popular on Monday morning.

TIME Body Image

Bye, Bye, Barbie: 2015 Is the Year We Abandon Unrealistic Beauty Ideals

Cali Girl Barbie waves from the front seat of a Chevy SSR du
Cali Girl Barbie waves from the front seat of a Chevy Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

As Barbie sales figures continue to drop, unrealistic ideals are losing clout both in the toy and fashion world

It may be time for Mattel to roll out Retirement Barbie. Friday morning, the toy-maker announced that the doll’s sales dropped 16% in 2014, marking Barbie’s third consecutive year of falling earnings.

“The reality is, we just didn’t sell enough Barbie dolls,” CEO Bryan Stockton explained to investors last January, following Mattel’s disappointing 13% drop for 2013. The decline of the company’s premier product lead in part to Stockton’s resignation on Monday. But a corporate shakeup might not be enough to counteract the almost 56-year-old doll’s waning allure. The problem might not be sales strategies, but rather the doll and the impossibly slim body ideals she represents.

The push for more realistic, “body positive” images of girls has been gaining momentum over the least year and not just in toys. In 2014, Barbie sales plummeted, while a doll with an average woman’s proportions gained viral success; full-bodied models were integrated into high fashion campaigns without fanfare; e-retailer ModCloth announced an anticipated doubling of its sales after introducing plus sizes; the single All About That Bass which celebrates curvy bodies became such a commercial success that, no, you will never get it out of your head; and Kim Kardashian’s famously ample butt broke the internet.

After decades of false starts, maybe we are finally ready to move away from unattainably slim ideals.

Fashion: Plus Size Integration Isn’t a Passing Trend

When we think of lingerie ads, winged Victoria’s Secret Angels flutter through our minds. But in November, alone, three high fashion institutions displayed a fuller understanidng of feminine beauty.

Seductively posed in a rubber leotard, Candice Huffine debuted as the first plus-size model to be featured in Pirella’s prestigious calendar in December:

A Vogue online gallery featured sexy lingerie starred women with F rather than B cup sizes. “Going into this, we assumed that the beautiful, delicate, lacy bras that we all prefer would only be available in the smaller cup sizes, but we were thrilled to find a real wealth of options for a huge variety of body shapes,” editor Jorden Bickham tells TIME in an email.

And Calvin Klein used Myla Dalbesio in its “Perfectly Fit” underwear campaign. Dalbesio, a size 10, told Elle, “It’s not like [Calvin Klein] released this campaign and were like ‘Whoa, look, there’s this plus-size girl in our campaign.’ They released me in this campaign with everyone else; there’s no distinction. It’s not a separate section for plus-size girls.” (This interview incited misappropriated backlash against CK when the Twitterverse thought Dalbesio was incorrectly cast under the “plus size” category — she wasn’t).

While the internet reacted to the seamless integration of fuller bodied models into these campaigns, the models were presented by designers without fanfare.

“There were no big tamborines, no big calling out of the size thing,” Emme, widely regarded as the first plus-size supermodel (even though she eschews the moniker), tells TIME. “It’s just so old. Saying ‘Oh she’s plus size, yippee!’ and making a big deal of that.”

Tess Holliday

Although there was certainly fanfare when size 22 model Tess Holliday was signed to MiLK Model Management last week — making her the first model of her size to ever be represented by a major agency.

“It was unheard of, I never even tried to get with an agency,” Holliday, 29, tells TIME. “One of my friends even said, ‘Isn’t it crazy that you’re in the news for being the biggest plus size model when you’re the true size of a plus size woman.'” Holliday says that the average plus size model is between size 8 and 10, even though the average plus size woman is bigger. “There has always been an issue with [designers] using smaller plus size models and if they wanted one who was a little bit bigger or curvier, they would pad her because they said they couldn’t find good quality models above a size 16.”

In the past, Holliday was barred from castings due to her size. But in the past week, Holliday says at least designers who refused to work with her in the past have now called to book her for a job. “If they want me then they’ll pay for it.”

Many of Holliday’s critics complain that she sets an unhealthy example for women, but the model notes that she is active, has a trainer, and works out at least four times a week. It should also be noted that just as skinniness does not connote healthiness, being a plus size doesn’t connote unhealthiness.

While Holliday is currently an anomaly, Muse Model Management president Conor Kennedy tells TIME that the fashion industry opening its doors to a variety of body sizes is a consistent movement rather than a “flavor in the moment” passing trend.

Vogue

“A few years ago there was a little burst where there was an Italian Vogue cover”—in which plus-size models seductively posed over… spaghetti—”and then V Magazine did a shoot, and then it tailored off,” he says. “The past two years it’s very different because there are all types of editorials. I think that the next breakthrough we are looking for are campaigns, and we’re starting to see it now.” Curvier celeb cover subjects like Kim Kardashian and Jennifer Lopez are also changing perceptions in the fashion industry.

Kennedy has noticed increased excitement on the creative side of the industry over a diversity of sizes as a desirable aesthetic choice and greater openness in castings.

“But there’s an evolution on both sides of the spectrum,” he says. “It’s also a great thing for business.”

Retailers Finally Recognize an Untapped Market

Clothing makers are finally beginning to understand that if they increase their offerings — and we’re talking fashionable offerings rather than an increased muumuu selection — in the “plus size” category, it will be beneficial to their bottom line. With the “average” American woman wearing a size 14, that’s potentially 100 million potential customers.

“It’s a huge market and it’s totally underserved” ModCloth co-founder Susan Gregg Koder told CNBC.

When Koder decided to expand the e-retailer’s plus size division, she reached out to 1,500 vendors for help — and only 35 responded. But a year into the expansion, with 100 vendors on board, Koder told Business Insider that she expected sales to double in 2014.

According to the market research firm NPD Group, plus-size clothing sales increased 5% last year to $17.5 billion. E-retailers are taking advantage of this rise. In December, plus size fashion e-retailer ELOQUII raised $6 million in Series A funding. But brick and mortar retailers still have room for improvement.

But the quality must improve as well because, at the moment, full bodied women are searching for — but often not finding — fashionable outfits that go up to their size. Stylist Sal Perez explained the difficulties in trying to dress Rebel Wilson for her role in Pitch Perfect 2 to the New York Times.

“I am horrified by some of the clothes I find in the stores,” she said. “I don’t know anyone who enjoys wearing polyester.”

Target premiers its plus-size line

After interacting with six different designers who wouldn’t dress her for the Oscars, Melissa McCarthy decided to launch a fashion label of her own that will offer both plus and “regular” size clothing.

Larger retailers are finally getting the message as well. In mid-February, Target will launch a plus-size line called Ava & Viv that is designed specifically for “the plus-size woman who loves fashion.”

“Women want to go shopping together,” Emme says. “If you eliminate the plus size department that’s always in the basement or next to maternity, and you increase the numbers of 14, 16 and 18’s, you are going to make more money than you have ever made.”

To illustrate her point, Emme recalls a plus-size fashion show she attended with her daughter at Macy’s. At the end of the show, the 13-year-old asked if Emme thought a particular dress came in her size — she didn’t see it as undesirable for a larger demographic, but as beautiful clothing displayed on a beautiful model who she would like to replicate.

“A lightbulb went off,” Emme says. “I don’t think the younger generation sees it as size. They see beauty as it is.”

The End of Barbie

New trends in toy sales serve as fiscal evidence that children also want natural, realistic beauty — rather than unattainable ideals. Barbie, who has seen her share of criticism for being an anatomically impossible mutant, is losing her clout among girls–and their parents. As people stopped buying Barbies, they crowd-funded an alternative to the tune of $500,000.

Touted as the “normal Barbie,” Lammily dolls are built to the measurements of an average woman, based on CDC data.

The “normal” Barbie, created by Nickolay Lamm, Lammily

“This is the doll people have been waiting for,” Lamm told TIME when he prepared to ship tens of thousands of dolls to eager backers before the holidays.

“She looks like a regular girl going to school,” a second grader said when she was presented with a Lammily doll.

“She’s not like other dolls,” said another. “She looks real.”

One of the reasons that Lamm was able turn the Lammily doll from a concept to an actual product was because his original sketches of the “normal Barbie” — meant to simply be an art project — went viral. Its traction online indicated to Lamm how thirsty people were to celebrate the beauty of reality.

While #thinspiration and unhealthy body ideals that promote eating disorders or worse certainly exist on social networks, an easily outraged Twitterverse is quick to call companies out for promoting body negative ideology.

People will no longer stand for Victoria’s Secret creating an advertisement that puts the wording “Perfect Body” over a slew of skinny skinny models. The company quietly changed its ads after an onslaught of social media outrage. And, some 20,000 people will sign Charge.org petitions when they find out that Old Navy charges more money for items that come in plus sizes. (The retailer didn’t fully capitulate, but it did change plus size policies.)

Holliday, who started a viral #EffYourBeautyStandards online campaign, attributes her recent signing and burgeoning career to her dedicated social media following. “People aren’t used to seeing someone who is fat and happy,” she says, which could be why her 415,000 Instagram followers so eagerly await her posts.

“It’s not a trend, really — it’s happening,” Emme says. “It’s the tipping point.”

TIME Super Bowl

McDonald’s Will Start Accepting ‘Lovin’ As Payment For Fries

According to the company's very cheesy Super Bowl ad

Last year, McDonald’s started letting customers buy meals using Apple Pay on their iPhones. But the fast food chain will start accepting a far stranger currency to pay for fries: ‘Lovin’.’

McDonald’s 2015 Super Bowl ad says that between Feb. 2 and 14, randomly selected customers will be offered the chance to do things like call their mom to say “I love you,” give someone a hug, or do a silly dance as a form of payment.

This is a part of McDonald’s revamped “I’m Lovin’ It” campaign. (The last ad in the series implied that a trip to a Play Place could help unclog bipartisan gridlock.)

TIME Family & Relationships

This Ad Perfectly Parodies the ‘Mommy Wars’

"Drug-free pool birth. Dolphin assisted."

A recent ad for baby formula brand Similac pokes fun at various parenting styles.

As a woman is sitting on a park bench cradling her baby, several different posses of moms and dads representing different outlooks on child-rearing converge. Working women in black suits use one arm to talk on their cell phones and the other arm to carry their babies, while “hippies,” wearing their babies in slings, strike a warrior pose on yoga mats. Watch five fathers square off with some sassy breast-feeding mothers, and the funniest part of all is when a mom brags about her “drug-free pool birth. Dolphin assisted.”

MORE: 5 Myths About Stay-At-Home Dads

LIST: The Top 16 Breastfeeding Controversies

TIME

Watch Ben Affleck, Matt Damon and Other Famous Patriots Fans Defend Their Hero Tom Brady

In a funny sketch from 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!'

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady has spent a lot of time denying any involvement with the (allegedly) deflated footballs used in the team’s semifinal game against the Indianapolis Colts.

In a Thursday night sketch, Jimmy Kimmel rounded up a a bunch of famous Bostonians to help defend Brady’s honor. Ben Affleck, Tom Brady, John Krasinski, Chris Evans and others bust out their best blue-collar Boston accents to assure us Brady did not let air out of the balls. In fact, they go ahead and claim personal responsibility.

They also make sure to point out how handsome and perfect and amazing they think Brady is. Could anyone that handsome and perfect and amazing really cheat?

TIME Science

You Can Sell Your Poop For $13,000 a Year

TIME.com stock photos Money Dollar Bills
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Some patients need fecal transplants to aid their digestive system

Money definitely doesn’t grow on trees, but it might be growing in your bowels. If you’re really healthy, you can sell your poop to sick people who need it for as much as $13,000 a year.

People who are infected with a bacteria called C. difficile need healthy fecal matter in their gut in order to survive — otherwise they need to be on constant antibiotic treatment. Some people with Crohn’s disease also benefit from fecal transplants. So a company called Open Biome has been facilitating fecal transplants to patients in need, and paying healthy poopers a hefty sum for their services.

Fecal matter is transferred either through endoscopy or swallowed capsules, and Open Biome has already shipped about 2,000 treatments to almost 200 hospitals, according to the Washington Post. They’ll pay you $40 per sample, plus an extra $50 if you come in 5 days a week (the donations have to be made on-site.) The only thing is, you have to be super-healthy: only about 4% of prospective donors make the cut.

Open Biome gives their anonymous donors names like Vladimir Pootin, Albutt Einstein, and Dumpledore, to help make the poop-handling thing go a little more smoothly, according to a New Yorker piece on the poop-donation industry. So who knows? Maybe you could be the next Rumpoostiltskin.

[Washington Post]

Read next: What Obama’s Tax Plan Would Mean for Your Wallet

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Super Bowl

Watch Obama Joke About ‘Deflategate’ Ahead of Sunday’s Super Bowl

"I want you all to keep it clean"

President Obama weighed into the ‘deflategate’ controversy by cracking a few jokes ahead of Sunday’s Super Bowl.

Speaking at the annual House Democratic retreat in Philadelphia on Thursday, Obama called on any supporters of the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks to keep it clean, CNN reports.

“I want to just remind the New England and Pacific Northwest contingents [that] this is the City of Brotherly Love, so regardless of what you think about Sunday, I want you all to keep it clean,” he said.

Rep. Joe Crowley then shouted from the audience, “bring your own balls!

The Patriots have been accused of deflating their footballs during the AFC Championship game against the Indianapolis Colts.

[CNN]

TIME celebrity

Tennis Star Andy Murray’s Fiancée Drops the F-Bomb Courtside, Internet Goes Wild

You need to have this girl on your side

Scottish tennis star Andy Murray may have just beaten Czech Tomas Berdych to make it through to the finals of the Australian Open, but it’s his fiancée Kim Sears who has taken social media by storm.

Cameras caught 27-year-old Sears’ apparent expletive-filled reaction to Murray’s break in the first set.

 

And professional lip-readers have been called in to suggest what Sears — an artist who specializes in animal portraits — was actually saying, the Telegraph reports.

Lip reader Tina Lannin believes Sears says,“F—— have that you flashy Czech, you flashy f—. If that’s what you get…”

Whereas lip reader and teacher Martine Monksfield thinks it was, “F—— have that Czech you fat old f—.”

But Jessica Rees, a forensic lip reader says it could be, “F—— hell! That f—— Czech could fight to five now he’s one down.”

Murray came to her defense after the match, saying the outburst was “completely normal.”

The Internet too found little wrong with somebody voicing, shall we say, impassioned support for her partner. German tennis player Andrew Petkovic summed up the feelings of many when she tweeted:

[Telegraph]

TIME viral

Watch a Daring Ice Climber Become the First to Conquer the Frozen Niagara Falls

"I may have reached the top, but Niagara won the war"

A number of brave souls have gone over the Niagara Falls, but on Tuesday Canadian ice climbers Will Gadd and Sarah Hueniken became the first people to scale the world famous landmark.

Initially kept secret by sponsor Red Bull, the daring stunt was officially announced when news of the harrowing climb began to spread, according to National Geographic.

The two climbers followed a route along the edge of Horseshoe Falls, a 150-foot waterfall that is considered to be the most powerful in the world. Hueniken, who grew up 20 miles away, belayed Gadd as he made the first ascent. Hueniken then followed around 40 minutes later.

To us regular folk it looks like victory, but Gadd felt as if Niagara may have won the battle.

“That climb beat me up. I may have reached the top, but Niagara won the war,” he told Red Bull. “At the end of the day I was hypothermic. That waterfall did a lot more damage to me than I did to it!”

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser