MONEY Pensions

How To Be a Millionaire — and Not Even Know It

Book whose pages are hundred dollar bills
iStock

A financial adviser explains to two teachers why they don't need a lot of money in the bank to be rich.

Mr. and Mrs. Rodrigues, 65 and 66 years old, were in my office. Their plan was to retire later this year. But they were worried.

“Our friends are retiring with Social Security, lump sum rollovers, and large investment accounts,” said Mr. Rodrigues, a school teacher from the North Shore of Boston. “All my wife and I will get is a lousy pension.”

Mr. Rodrigues continued: “A teacher’s pay is mediocre compared to what our friends earn in the private sector. We know that when we start our career. But with retirement staring us in the face, and no more regular paycheck, I’m worried.”

Public school teachers are among the worst-paid professionals in America – if you look at their paycheck alone. But when it comes to retirement packages, they have some of the best financial security in the country.

For private sector employees, the responsibility of managing retirement income sits largely on their shoulders. Sure, Social Security will provide a portion of many people’s retirement income, but for most, it is up to the retiree to figure out how to pull money from IRAs, 401(k)s, investment accounts, and/or bank accounts to support their lifestyle each year. Throughout retirement, many worry about running out of money or the possibility of their investments’ losing value.

Teachers, on the other hand, have a much larger safety net.

Both of the Rodrigueses worked as high school teachers for more than 30 years. Each was due a life-only pension of $60,000 upon retirement. That totaled a guaranteed lifetime income of $10,000 per month, or $120,000 per year. When one of them dies, the decedent’s pension will end, but the survivor will continue receiving his or her own $60,000 income.

The Rodrigueses told me they needed about $85,000 a year.

Surely their pension would cover their income needs.* And since the two both teach and live in Massachusetts, their pension will be exempt from state tax.

As for their balance sheet, they had no mortgage, no credit card debts, and no car payments. They had a $350,000 home, $18,000 cash in the bank, and a $134,000 investment account.

But as far as the Rodrigueses were concerned, they hadn’t saved enough.

“All my friends boast about the size of the 401(k)s they rolled over to IRAs,” Mr. Rodrigues said. “Some of them say they have more than $1 million for retirement.”

It was time to show the couple that their retirement situation wasn’t so gloomy – especially considering what their private-sector friends would need in assets to create the same income stream.

“What if I told you that your financial situation is better than most Americans?” I asked.

They thought I was joking.

Their friends, I explained, would need about $1.7 million to match their $120,000 pension income for life.

To explain my case, I pulled out a report on annuities that addressed the question of how much money a person would need at age 65 to generate a certain number of dollars in annual income.

Here’s an abbreviated version of the answer:

Annual Pension Lump Sum Needed
$48,000 $700,539
$60,000 $876,886
$75,000 $1,100,736

If you work in the private sector, are you a little jealous? If you’re a teacher, do you feel a little richer?

The Rodrigues were shocked. Soon Mr. Rodrigues calmed down and Mrs. Rodrigues smiled. Their jealousy was replaced with a renewed appreciation for the decades of service they provided to the local community.

Whether your pension is $30,000, $60,000 or $90,000, consider the amount of money that’s needed to guarantee your income. It’s probably far more than you think. And it’s not impacted by the stock market, interest rates, and world economic issues.

With a guaranteed income and the likelihood of state tax exemption on their pension, Mr. and Mrs. Rodrigues felt like royalty. After all, they had just learned that they were millionaires.

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* The survivor’s $60,000 pension, of course, would be less than the $85,000 annual income the two of them say they’ll need. A few strategies to address this: (1) Expect a reduced spending need in a one-person household. (2) Draw income from the couple’s other assets. (3) Downsize and use the net proceeds from the house’s sale to supplement spending needs. (4) Select the survivor option for their pensions, rather than the life-only option. They would have a reduced monthly income check while they are both living, yet upon one of their deaths the survivor would receive a reduced survivor monthly pension benefit along with his or her own pension.
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Marc S. Freedman, CFP, is president and CEO of Freedman Financial in Peabody, Mass. He has been delivering financial planning advice to mass affluent Baby Boomers for more than two decades. He is the author of Retiring for the GENIUS, and he is host of “Dollars & Sense,” a weekly radio show on North Shore 104.9 in Beverly, Mass.

MONEY Kids and Money

The Best Thing You Can Do Now for Your Kid’s Financial Future

CAN'T BUY ME LOVE, from left: Patrick Dempsey, Amanda Peterson, 1987.
Your teens summer earnings can't buy love, but they can buy a bit of retirement security. Buena Vista Pictures—Courtesy Everett Collection

Open a Roth IRA for your child's summer earnings, and talk her through the decisions on how to invest that money, suggests financial planner Kevin McKinley.

In my last column, I extolled the virtues of opening—and perhaps even contributing to—a Roth IRA for a working teenager. In short, a little bit of money saved now can make a big difference over a long time, and give your child a nice cushion upon which to build a solid nest egg.

Besides underscoring the importance of saving for retirement early and regularly, opening a Roth IRA can help your child become a savvy investor (a skill many people learn the hard way).

Here’s how:

Make the Initial Contribution

Your child needs to earn money if he or you are going to contribute to an IRA on his behalf. For the 2014 tax year, the limit for a Roth IRA contribution for those under age 50 is the lesser of the worker’s earnings, or $5,500.

The deadline for making the contribution is April 15, 2015. But you can start sooner, even if your teen hasn’t yet earned the money on which you will be basing the IRA contribution. (If the kid doesn’t earn enough to justify your contributions, you can withdraw the excess with relatively little in the way of paperwork or penalties.)

For a minor child, you will have to open a “custodial” Roth IRA on her behalf, using her Social Security number. Not every brokerage or mutual fund company that will open a Roth IRA for an adult will do so for a minor, but many of the larger ones will, including Vanguard, Schwab, and TD Ameritrade.

As the custodian, you make the decisions on investment choices—as well as decisions on if, why, and when the money might be withdrawn—until she reaches “adulthood,” defined by age (usually between 18 and 21, depending on your state of residence). Once she ages out, the account will then need to be re-registered in her name.

Depending on which provider you choose, you may be able to make systematic, automated contributions to the IRA (for example, $200 per month) from a checking or savings account. To encourage your teen to participate, you might offer to match every dollar he puts in.

Have the “Risk vs. Reward” Talk

How an adult should invest an IRA depends upon the person’s goals and risk tolerance—the same is true for a teen. You can help set those parameters by pointing out to your child that, since he’s unlikely to retire until his 60s this is likely to be a decades-long investment, and enduring short-term downturns is the price for enjoying higher potential long-term gains.

You might also show him the difference between depositing $1,000 now and earning, say, 3% annually vs. 7% annually over the next 50 years—that is, a balance of $4,400 vs. a balance of $29,600. Ask your child: Which would you rather?

No doubt, your kid will choose the bigger number.

But you also want this to be a lesson in the risks involved in investing. You might talk about what a severe one-year decline of 40% or more might do to his investment and explain that bigger drops are more likely in investments that have the potential for bigger growth. Now how do you feel about that 7%?

Some teenagers will be perfectly fine accepting the risk. Others may be more skittish.

You also might explain that there are options that will not decline in value at all—such as CDs and money market accounts. But should he choose those safer options, he’ll be trading off high reward for that benefit of low risk. In fact, while his money will grow, it will likely not keep up with the rate at which prices grow (“inflation,” in adult terms). So his money will actually be worth less by the time he’s ready to retire.

Some risk, therefore, will likely be necessary in order to grow his money in a meaningful way.

Choose Investments Together

Assuming he can tolerate some fluctuation, a stock-based mutual fund is probably the most appropriate and profitable strategy—especially since a fund can theoretically offer him a ownership in hundreds of different securities even though he may only be investing a few thousand dollars. You might explain that this diversification protects against some of the risks of decline since some stocks will rise when others fall.

A particularly-suitable option might be a “target date” or “life cycle” fund. These offerings are geared toward a specific year in the future—for instance, one near the time at which your child might retire.

Target date funds are usually a portfolio comprised of several different funds. The portfolio allocation starts out fairly aggressive, with a majority of the money invested in stock-based funds, and much smaller portion in bond funds or money market accounts.

As time goes by—and your child’s prospective retirement draws nearer—the allocation of the overall fund gradually becomes more conservative.

The value of the account can still rise and fall in the years nearing retirement, but with likely less volatility than what could be experienced in the early years.

One low-cost example of this type of investment is the Vanguard Retirement 2060 Fund (VTTSX).

Of course, if you choose a brokerage account for your child’s Roth IRA, you have the option of purchasing shares in a company that might be of particular interest to your kid. Choosing a company that is familiar to your child may not only inspire her to watch the stock and learn more about it, but eventually profit from the money she is spending on “her” company’s products.

If you’re going to go this route, you should include a discussion on the increased volatility (for better or worse) of owning one or two stocks, rather than the diversification offered by the aforementioned mutual fund.

Kevin McKinley is a financial planner and owner of McKinley Money LLC, a registered investment advisor in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He’s also the author of Make Your Kid a Millionaire. His column appears weekly.

Read more from Kevin McKinley:

 

MONEY Estate Planning

When Tragedy Strikes a Young Family

hospital bracelet on patient
Fuse—Getty Images

A cancer diagnosis prompts a financial planner to reflect on the fragility of life and the importance of preparing for the worst.

I have a client who is 39. He’s married and has two young children. He has an extremely successful career. He and his family are really hitting their stride.

One day he started to feel unwell. Eventual checkups led to a diagnosis of cancer. His wife called me on a Saturday morning to discuss the shock of what they were going through, and to get some basic sense of what to expect next, financially.

There’s no way to prepare yourself for this kind of devastating news. Brené Brown discusses this eloquently when she talks about “foreboding joy” — the sense we sometimes have, when things are going well, that something terrible will happen to us or someone we love.

This mental rehearsal for the worst-case scenario doesn’t make it any easier when we get tragic news; instead, it gets in the way of our truly feeling joyful and present in the moment right now.

What can give us a lot of peace of mind is financial preparation — the knowledge that our families will be taken care of if something happens to us. Here are some important elements of that planning:

  • Life Insurance: If you have young children who are depending on your income, a good 20- to 30-year level term policy is a solid foundation to help support your family through the children’s school years.
  • Disability Insurance: Being injured or sick and unable to work is often more financially catastrophic than death, since your expenses have likely increased to deal with your treatment, but your income has gone away. A good disability policy through your employer or through a private insurer is great protection, since it will provide at least part of your income while you’re unable to earn a living. This coverage is more expensive than life insurance, since it is far more likely a person will become disabled rather than die early, but disability insurance has substantial benefits.
  • Emergency Fund: A baseline amount of cash is the protective foundation to any financial plan. This isn’t because cash is such a great deal, since returns in savings accounts nowadays are minimal at best. Emergency funds are a great deal because they allow us to weather financial storms — for example, covering waiting period before the benefits on a disability insurance policy kick in — and ultimately to take advantage of opportunities when they present themselves.
  • Wills, Living Wills, and Powers of Attorney: If you have young children, this is essential. The issue isn’t if you or your spouse die; it’s if both of you die, since those kids will inherit life insurance proceeds, retirement plan benefits, and more. If you and your partner both get run over by the proverbial bus, you need to make provisions for who will take care of your children. You should make that decision, and not leave the courts to decide if you’re not around. Living wills allow you to state your end-of-life choices; while never easy to carry out, they always provide a level of peace to families who know they’re carrying out their loved one’s wishes.

A few weeks later, I had lunch with this couple. The husband was about to have surgery. “If I don’t wake up,” he asked, “what’s going to happen?”

It was the best of a bad situation: He had insurance. They had an emergency fund. They had the necessary end-of-life and estate-planning documents. Were he to not pull through, his wife and children would be in a position to try to find a new normal. (In fact, he did pull through, and he’s working on his recovery.)

The most important thing for any patient with a long-term illness is to focus on his overall health and mental outlook. Having financial plans in place allows a patient to set other worries aside. He can tell himself, “In the worst-case scenario, my family will be all right. Now I can focus on ‘What can I do to be well?'”

All our days are numbered. The question is, can you be present for the time that you have? The right financial plan can ease the way.

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H. Jude Boudreaux, CFP, is the founder of Upperline Financial Planning, a fee-only financial planning firm based in New Orleans. He is an adjunct professor at Loyola University New Orleans, a past president of the Financial Planning Association‘s NexGen community, and an advocate for new and alternative business models for the financial planning industry.

MONEY financial advisers

How to Be Nosy About Your Financial Adviser’s Finances

magnifying glass looking at new $100 bills
LM Otero—AP

You probably want to know how rich your financial adviser is. Here are some better ways to pry about his or her money.

What’s your net worth?

We financial professionals think nothing of asking clients this question. If the tables were turned, though, and clients or prospective clients asked the same question of us, how would we respond?

Every now and then this issue comes up in conversations among financial planners. Some advisers think their net worth is none of their clients’ business, any more than doctors’ cholesterol levels are any business of their patients.

Others are concerned that a single number like net worth is incomplete information and can even be misleading. Knowing a financial professional has a net worth of, say, $5 million doesn’t necessarily mean the person is a trustworthy or capable financial planner. Net worth tells prospective clients nothing about where the money came from. The planner may have inherited it, won the lottery, made it through a business other than financial planning, earned it from commissions on poor investments, or even obtained it illegally.

Nor does net worth reveal anything useful about someone’s understanding of money or knowledge of financial planning. I’ve worked with plenty of multi-millionaires who were horrible money managers and inept at investing. There are also many brilliant young planners who haven’t had the time to accumulate a large net worth.

I suspect that most clients who want to know about their planners’ net worth actually have several deeper questions in mind. Some may be asking if the professional actually follows his or her own advice. Imagine how troubling it might be to find out your financial planner doesn’t have a retirement plan, is a habitual over-spender, or hasn’t gotten around to making a will.

Another reason for the question may be a concern whether the planner is financially stable and will be around in the future. During the Great Recession, many financial professionals saw their revenues fall by 30% to 40%. Some who did not have a business emergency reserve had to resort to laying off staff, cutting services, or in some cases closing their doors.

Still another concern may be whether the planner is familiar with a potential client’s particular financial issues. This is especially true of high-net-worth clients. They need to know a planner can relate to the complexities, responsibilities, and emotional challenges of managing wealth.

All of these are legitimate concerns. Knowing a financial planner’s net worth, however, doesn’t address those concerns. It would be more useful for clients to get answers to questions like the following:

  • Do you follow the same advice you give clients? Give me some examples.
  • Do you have six months’ living expenses in an emergency account?
  • Do you invest your money in the same manner you will invest mine?
  • If I were to run a credit report on you, what would it tell me?
  • What are some of the things you have learned from your financial mistakes?
  • Tell me what your company has in place for emergency planning and succession planning.
  • Tell me why you can relate to someone with my net worth and the issues I am facing.

Very few prospective clients are likely to ask questions like these. That doesn’t mean they don’t want to know the answers.

Planners who want to provide exceptional service to their clients might consider providing such answers freely and transparently, without waiting to be asked. We expect clients to trust us with their financial information. One way to build that trust may be to share some information of our own.

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Rick Kahler, ChFC, is president of Kahler Financial Group, a fee-only financial planning firm. His work and research regarding the integration of financial planning and psychology has been featured or cited in scores of broadcast media, periodicals and books. He is a co-author of four books on financial planning and therapy. He is a faculty member at Golden Gate University and the president of the Financial Therapy Association.

MONEY Social Security

Maximize Your Social Security Benefits…By Not Freaking Out

Seniors doing yoga on the beach
Lyn Balzer and Tony Perkins—Getty Images

A financial planner explains why, when it comes to retirement income, being patient can pay off in a big way.

About a month ago, a client walked into our office and announced that he had decided to take his retirement package being offered at work. We had to work out a number of issues related to his company’s retirement benefits. Finally, when the subject of Social Security came up, my client said, “I want to start taking the benefit as soon as I can, before they stop it.”

His opinion of Social Security is common. Many retirees believe that Social Security may run out or that Congress may legislate away their benefit.

We pushed back on this. First, the actuarial analysis shows the Social Security fund is pretty secure; it is Medicare that we all need to be worried about. Second, we feel that for a current retiree, the benefit amount is fairly safe; the only possible changes might involve a lower increase in the annual benefit. We agree with most experts that making changes to current benefits is a non-starter.

Our client was persuaded. Then he asked us a question we hear a lot: “When should I start taking Social Security, at age 66 or 70?”

The answer is not straightforward. If our client — let’s call him Jack — started taking Social Security at age 66, he’d receive a monthly benefit of $2,430. But your initial benefit increases the longer you postpone taking it, until you reach age 70. If Jack delayed taking the benefit until he turned 70, the initial amount would be $3,680, or 52% more per month.

Since Jack has other forms of retirement income, he doesn’t need the monthly check as soon as possible to live on. Instead, Jack’s goal is to get as much back from Uncle Sam as possible.

If Jack started his benefit at age 66, he would receive approximately $116,700 by age 70. (He’d actually get more, since benefits are adjusted annually for inflation. But for the sake of simplicity, I am ignoring inflation and other complicating factors.)

If he waited until age 70, he would be receiving $1,250 more per month, but he wouldn’t have received any money over the prior four years. It would take around 94 months to recoup the $116,700 he did not earn by waiting.

In other words, Jack would have an eight-year breakeven point if he waited until 70. If Jack dies before age 78, he would have received more by taking the benefit at age 66; if he lives past 78, he would be better off to wait until age 70. Federal life expectancy tables say a male 65 years old has a life expectancy of age 82. So if Jack has average health, the odds suggest he should wait until age 70 to take his benefit.

Jack’s wife — we’ll call her Jill — is 65, and has been retired for a couple of years. Jill’s Social Security projection looks like $2,120 monthly at age 66 or $3,200 at age 70. Jill’s breakeven also projects to be at age 78, yet her life expectancy is age 85, so the odds that she will be better off waiting until age 70 are greater than Jack’s.

But they both shouldn’t necessarily wait until 70 to take their benefits. Why? Because Social Security offers married couples a spousal benefit option.

This takes us into a different kind of strategy with our clients, something advisers call “file and suspend.”

It is possible to start taking a spousal benefit at age 66 (as long as your spouse has filed for his or her own benefit amount) and let your personal benefit increase to the maximum amount at age 70. The strategy is to have both spouses wait until 70 to take their own benefit, but for the spouse with the lower benefit amount to take a spousal benefit from age 66 up to age 70. For this to work, the spouse with the higher benefit amount needs to file for his or her benefit—then suspend receiving his or her own benefit until age 70.

For Jack and Jill, the file and suspend would work as follows: Jack, the spouse with the higher benefit, files for benefits at age 66, then immediately requests the benefits be suspended; that’s “file and suspend.” Then at age 70, he requests his benefits, which would be approximately $3,680 a month.

Jill files for her spousal benefit at age 66. This allows her to delay her own benefit while collecting a spousal benefit of around $1,250 a month. Then at age 70, she cancels the spousal benefit in order to collect her full benefit of $3,200 a month.

This scenario would provide them an added benefit of almost $60,000 in those first 4 years!

All Social Security scenarios have a breakeven age, so it is important to take an honest look at your health when evaluating all your options. The most important factor is your own cash flow need when you retire. If Social Security is going to be one’s sole source of income in retirement, waiting until age 70 is probably not an option.

But for those who can, delaying benefits is a useful tool. Outliving your money in your 80s or 90s is a real possibility. Postponing Social Security to allow for the highest possible benefit can mitigate that longevity risk.

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Scott Leonard, CFP, is the owner of Navigoe, a registered investment adviser with offices in Nevada and California. Author of The Liberated CEO, published by Wiley in 2014, Leonard was able to run his business, originally established in 1996, while taking his family on a two-year sailing trip from Florida to New Caledoniain the south Pacific Ocean. He is a speaker on investment and wealth management issues.

MONEY financial advisers

Dealing With the ‘Personal’ in Personal Finance

Two people shaking hands above restaurant table with laptop
Tom Merton—Getty Images

To really help people, financial planners have to delve into the the feelings and emotions that drive their clients' financial decisions. One planner explains why that's so hard.

While most of us financial advisers want to do the best for our clients, we often struggle at the task.

The main problem, as I recently wrote: We don’t know our clients well enough. We may say that a client’s values and goals are important, but most of us don’t adequately explore these more personal (a.k.a. “touchy-feely”) parts of a client’s life.

Why is this?

One reason we avoid deeper discovery with clients: No matter how we’re paid—whether by commissions or fees—most of us don’t get compensated until the financial planning process has neared its end.

Let’s use the six-step Certified Financial Planner model as an example. The information-gathering stage, when we have the chance to really understand who our clients are, is the second step. But most advisers don’t get paid until step five, when clients implement our recommendations.

Advisers, therefore, have an inherent economic bias to get to step five as soon as possible.

The second reason we don’t dig deep: Having in-depth conversations with clients can be uncomfortable—mostly for us. We, as advisers, may feel underqualified or inadequately trained to delve into the beliefs, feelings and emotions that drive their financial decisions.

I get it. About seven years ago, I decided that I needed to give and get more out of client interactions, not merely through questions at opportunistic times, but by a deliberate process.

On the day I decided to implement this new strategy, I saw I had a data-gathering meeting on my schedule. Perfect. I was ready to jump right in.

I had met the woman in this husband-and-wife household before—she was a human resources executive at a large company—but not the man. And he turned out to be a “man’s man.” His shoulders were so broad that he had to turn sideways to get through the doorway to my conference room. Scowling, he extended a bear-sized arm and squeezed my hand hard enough to send the clear message that he’d rather be anyplace but there.

“Really?” I asked myself. “I’m going to ask this guy about his values and goals? About his history with money and about the feelings and emotions evoked by his personal financial dealings?”

After I could delay no longer, we got down to it. My assumption that this guy would recoil from an introspective conversation was completely wrong. In fact, my nonfinancial questions clearly set this visibly hesitant client at ease.

The truth is that we’re all capable of communicating more meaningfully with our clients. We do it with our family and close friends all the time. Aren’t we capable of simply getting to know someone?

To claim lack of expertise is a cop-out. There is plenty of help out there for gathering information about intangibles. Here are three resources I’ve found extremely useful:

  • George Kinder: Kinder is a Harvard-educated financial planner who is often dubbed the “Father of Life Planning.” Personally, I find the term “life planning” problematic. It seems to brand intangible data-gathering as something apart from good financial planning, which lets the rest of us off the hook. Kinder’s work, however, should not be discounted. Kinder’s book, The Seven Stages of Money Maturity, effectively started a movement that continues to grow as new generations of planners look for more personally rewarding practices. Another of his books, Lighting the Torch, provides planners with a practical methodology to incorporate into their process.
  • Rick Kahler, Ted Klonz, and Brad Klontz: Kahler, a financial planner in South Dakota, teamed up with psychotherapists Ted and Brad Klontz on two projects that have immeasurable value to the financial planning community. The Financial Wisdom of Ebenezer Scrooge is a short, easy-to-read volume that will help both advisers and their clients examine the motives behind our financial decisions, successes and failures. I had the privilege of studying with Ted and Rick immediately following the release of their second collaboration, Facilitating Financial Health. Written for the serious practitioner, it’s one of the most highlighted books in my library.
  • Carol Anderson and Amy Mullen: Last, but in my opinion the most important, is what I believe to be the ideal resource for financial advisers who truly want to institute more meaningful conversations with their clients. With Money Quotient, Anderson and Mullen have created something very special: a nonprofit devoted to providing advisers with tangible tools designed to elicit intangible information from clients. Various degrees of licensing allow advisers to merely dabble with some of Money Quotient’s tools or transform their entire practice in a way that puts client values and goals at the center of their process.

Acknowledging that personal finance is more personal than it is finance is a great beginning. But the light-bulb moment is only valuable if it leads to the application of the associated theories and concepts.

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Financial planner, speaker, and author Tim Maurer, is a wealth adviser at Buckingham Asset Management and the director of personal finance for the BAM Alliance. A certified financial planner practitioner working with individuals, families and organizations, he also educates at private events and via TV, radio, print, and online media. “Personal finance is more personal than it is finance” is the central theme that drives his writing and speaking.

MONEY Estate Planning

How Writing a Will Is Like Backing Up Your Hard Drive

computer hooked up to external hard drives
Peter Cade—Getty Images

In life as in computing, a little planning now prevents a lot of pain down the road.

Goodbyes are never easy, particularly if the relationship was a cherished one. Such was the case for me and my beloved hard drive. Its capacity for capturing great conversations, thoughts, and images felt irreplaceable. My heart sank as the computer technician conducted its last rites.

But thanks to technological advances, a mirror image of my hard drive’s legacy resided only a download away. The online backup reduced my anxiety and helped me resume my daily activities. Preparing for the inevitable allowed me and my hard drive to appreciate our time together and live life with no residual regrets.

How would life be different if we applied such a healthy, forward-looking mindset to our human relationships through estate planning? After all, as with hard drives, our limited shelf life requires that we make the most of each day while also planning for a peaceful transition. Having loved ones struggle with managing unorganized financial affairs with no assistance only prolongs grief and blemishes fond memories.

Unfortunately, a lack of an estate plan is common for many households. According to a 2012 survey by Rocket Lawyer, 41% of Baby Boomers and 71% of people age 34 and younger don’t have wills. Giving legal direction regarding your finances, property, and children upon your death takes the guessing game out such important matters. Who knows your desires better than you? Otherwise, you leave the courts to untangle your affairs at the expense of your loved ones.

Preparing a will requires that you name individuals who are responsible for settling your estate (executors), taking care of your minor children (guardians) and managing the trusts you establish for the benefit of others (trustees). Having an up-to-date list of your financial assets and liabilities, including digital accounts and passwords, helps smooth the settlement of your estate. (Some people prefer a living trust to direct their estate rather than a will, in order to avoid probate — a legal process that validates the will.)

Other important estate planning documents include a durable power of attorney, durable power of attorney for health care, and a living will.

Durable powers of attorneys (POAs) give another person the authority to manage your financial, personal or health care affairs on your behalf in the event of mental incapacity (brought on by such conditions as dementia or a terminal illness). Health care POAs should also include Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) provisions governing an individual’s privacy and access to medical records. A living will gives special consideration to your preference regarding medical treatments that may prolong your life.

Some financial assets and property transfer outside of the will. Financial assets such as life insurance and retirement assets transfer by beneficiary designation. Bank accounts and some investment accounts can transfer by establishing these accounts as a payable on death (POD). How property is titled determines whether the property is considered a probate asset or a non-probate asset. It is important to review these documents regularly to keep up with life changes such as marriage, children, and divorce, and to ensure that assets transfer according to your wishes.

Related:
10 Steps to Painless Estate Planning
Why You Need an Insurance Inventory

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Lazetta Rainey Braxton is a certified financial planner and CEO of Financial Fountains. She assists individuals, families, and institutions with achieving financial well-being and contributing to the common good through financial planning and investment management services. She serves as president of the Association of African American Financial Advisors. Braxton holds an MBA in finance and entrepreneurship from Wake Forest University and a BS in finance and international business from the University of Virginia.

MONEY Pensions

Reasons to Hold Off on That Pension Buyout Offer

Lump-sum pension buyouts are a good deal for employers. But workers who take them could lose out if interest rates rise.

If you work for a company with a pension plan, don’t be surprised if you get an offer soon for a lump sum buyout—a deal where you accept a pile of cash in exchange for the promise of lifetime income when you retire.

The price tag for these offers is especially attractive right now, from the plan sponsor’s perspective. But workers might do better by holding out for a better deal, or by rejecting the buyout altogether.

A growing number of plan sponsors are trying to get out of the pension business, or lighten their obligations, by buying out workers. The number of buyout offers has accelerated in recent years, in part because of interest rate changes mandated by Congress that reduce their cost to plan sponsors.

Now, revised projections for average American longevity are giving plan sponsors new reasons to accelerate buyout offers. New Internal Revenue Service actuarial tables that take effect in 2016 show average lifespans up by about four years each for men, to an average of 86.6 years, and women, to 88.8 years.

The new mortality tables will make lump sum offers 3% to 8% more expensive for sponsors, according to a recent analysis by Wilshire Consulting, which advises pension plan sponsors. Another implicit message here is that lump sum offers should be more valuable to workers who take them after the new mortality tables take effect.

Unfortunately, it’s not that simple.

“We’re definitely seeing an increase in lump sum offers from plan sponsors,” says Jeff Leonard, managing director at Wilshire Consulting, and one of the experts who prepared the analysis. “But if it was one of my parents, I’m not sure if I’d encourage them to take the offer now or wait.”

The reason for his uncertainty is the future direction of interest rates. If rates were to rise over the next couple years from today’s historic low levels, that would reduce lump sum values enough to offset increases generated by the new mortality tables. Leonard estimates that a rate jump of just 50 basis points would eliminate any gain pensioners might see from the new tables.

Deciding whether to accept a lump sum offer is highly personal. A key factor is how healthy you think you are in relation to the rest of the population. If you think you’ll beat the averages, a lifetime of pension income will always beat the lump sum.

Another consideration is financial. Some people decide to take lump sum deals when they have other guaranteed income streams, such as a spouse’s pension or high Social Security benefits.

The size of the proposed buyout matters, too. If you’ve only worked for your employer a short time and the payout is small, it may be convenient to take the buyout and consolidate it with your other retirement assets.

Some people think they can do better by taking the lump sum and investing the proceeds. It’s possible, but there are always the risks of withdrawing too much, market setbacks or living far beyond the actuarial averages, meaning you would need to stretch that nest egg further.

And doing better on a risk-adjusted basis means you would have to consistently beat the rate used to calculate the lump sum by investing in nearly risk-free investments—certificates of deposit and Treasuries—since the pension income stream you would receive is guaranteed. Although the math here is complicated, it usually doesn’t work out in a pensioner’s favor.

Could you wait for a better deal? Lump sum buyouts are take-it-or-leave it propositions. But Leonard says workers who decline an offer may get additional opportunities over the next few years as plan sponsors keep working to reduce their pension obligations. “Candidly, I think we’ll see a continued series of windows of opportunity.”

MONEY Financial Planning

Why Millennials Aren’t Getting Love from Financial Advisers

Financial advisers are aging and mostly targeting their peer group. Where can a dedicated Millennial saver get answers?

“Follow the money” was sage advice in All the President’s Men, and “show me the money” worked well enough for the characters in Jerry Maguire. Now financial advisers are taking the same approach in their pursuit of new clients.

A third say they aren’t interested in your business if you have less than $500,000 to invest and 57% want at least $250,000 in assets to get on the phone, according to a survey from Principal Financial Group. Okay. These are business people following the money in their quest for higher fees and more commissions.

Yet this approach pretty much ignores the next mega-generation—the 80 million Millennials, the oldest of which are now turning the corner on 30. Just 18% of financial advisers say they are prospecting in this demographic. Millennials don’t have a lot of assets at this point in their life, and 29% of advisers say this generation has little interest in their services because of the cost, Principal found. So why bother?

Well, anyone building a wealth management business for the long term might find plenty of gold in this group. Millennials are hell-bent on saving and investing long term, and providing for their own financial security. Eight in 10 Millennials say the recession convinced them they must save more now, according to the 2014 Wells Fargo Millennial Study. Meanwhile, the financial industry, banks in particular, have a long way to go win this generation’s trust. They might want to get started.

Most wealth advisers are focused on Baby Boomers (64%), high net worth clients (64%) and business owners (62%). For those willing to work with the less well-heeled—advisers who just getting started and willing to build a practice over time—these twenty-somethings offer a huge opportunity. One issue, though, is that there aren’t a lot of young wealth advisers out there. Like bus drivers and clergy, this profession has a slow replacement rate and is aging fast. Among the 300,000 or so full-time financial advisers, the average age is about 50, and 21% are over 60.

The result is an industry filled with people that largely do not relate to Millennials and do not care because they have so little to invest. At the same time, we have a generation that has got the message on saving and wants to get serious about investing for its financial future. So it’s not surprising that a growing number are turning instead to online financial advice firms—start-ups such as Betterment, Wealthfront and Personal Capital—to get investment guidance with little or no minimum and at lower cost. Millennials may be broke and fee averse. But they won’t be that way forever. This time, “show me the money” may be bad strategy.

MONEY Health Care

How to Fix Your Finances…By Fixing Your Blood Pressure

Blood Pressure Gauge
Anthony Harvie—Getty Images

High blood pressure is hazardous to more than your health. Here's how to ease the impact on your finances.

High blood pressure affects one in three adults in the United States. It can have a major impact on your health, of course; as a financial planner, I’m also conscious of the negative consequences it can have for your finances, too.

The challenge with high blood pressure is that it does not cause a person to feel ill. With health care costing as much as it does, it is easy to forgo treatment for an illness that doesn’t cause many symptoms. So many people leave their high blood pressure untreated.

The end result of this inaction: greater illness and higher health care costs down the road. Untreated high blood pressure leads to heart disease, strokes, or heart and kidney failure. Not treating high blood pressure is a perfect example of being penny-wise and dollar-foolish.

So given the importance of treating high blood pressure, what can people do to control the current cost of their illness? A couple of actions can go a long way.

Improve Your Lifestyle

An unhealthy lifestyle is the most common way people develop high blood pressure in the first place. Weight loss, regular exercise, salt reduction, and limiting alcohol are cheap ways to potentially eliminate the disease. These aren’t easy changes at first, but by developing a new lifestyle as a habit, the new behavior gets easier with time.

A healthy diet is also important, but a diet heavy in vegetables, fruit, and unprocessed food can cost a lot and require time-consuming amounts of cooking. One way to mitigate this cost is to become an “Iron Chef”: work with the raw material at hand. Go with what’s on sale in the grocery aisle, or even better, hit the farmer’s market. Spend a couple of hours on days off to cook enough to last most of the week.

Manage Your Medicine

Doctors choose medication to treat high blood pressure based on a number of factors. Concurrent illness, other medication, demographics, and potential side effects all play a role. The good news is that most medication used to treat high blood pressure comes in generic form, and the generics work just fine. Generics are cheap. In fact, some pharmacies will provide generic medication for high blood pressure for free! Your doctor will know if these opportunities are available in your area; it’s up to you to ask about the options.

The most important part of medication management is consistency. Medication taken regularly and about the same time everyday results in better blood pressure control. Ideally, people brush their teeth every day, so why not put your medication by the toothbrush and make it part of the routine?

If your blood pressure is too high, the doctor will see you every couple of weeks or so until it is in a good range. If blood pressure is well controlled with lifestyle and medication, doctor visits are reduced to once or twice a year, depending on other health issues. Better control results in fewer doctor visits, which reduces the cost of care.

High blood pressure doesn’t have to be costly. By being forward-thinking about it, you can greatly improve the quality and length of your life — and lower your expenses along the way.

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Carolyn McClanahan is a physician, financial planner, and founder of Life Planning Partners. In addition to running her financial planning practice, she educates financial planners, health care professionals, and the public on the intersections of health and personal finance.

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