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Americans are becoming increasingly stressed over their finances. In fact, the current financial stress rates in the U.S. are among the highest they have ever been over the last five years, according to consulting firm PwC’s 2016 Employee Financial Wellness Survey.

To find out exactly what is causing so much financial stress among many Americans, GOBankingRates.com surveyed more than 7,000 people in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and asked them: “Of the following, what is your No. 1 cause of financial stress?”

The survey respondents had seven options to choose from:

  • Paying off my debt (i.e. credit cards)
  • Not being able to retire
  • Not having enough money to fund an emergency
  • Wanting a nicer lifestyle
  • Paying for education
  • Lack of stable income
  • Paying my mortgage or rent

Among all states and DC, the most common answer respondents gave was “paying off my debt,” followed by “not being able to retire” and “not having enough money to fund an emergency.” The least popular answer was “paying my mortgage or rent.”

Regardless of the cause of financial stress, it’s important to address it rather than ignore it, said Stephen Alred Jr., founder of fee-only financial planning firm Ignite Financial.

“Create a strategy, or hire a professional to create one for you that will have actionable steps,” he said.

Find out what the most common causes of financial stress are in your state — as well as steps you can take to get rid of your stress.

Wyoming: Paying Off My Debt

Despite being one of the top five states where families can live a richer life, Wyoming residents carry slightly more credit card debt than the national average — $5,716 versus $5,700, according to research by personal finance site ValuePenguin.

For those burdened by debt, certified financial planner and Brunch & Budget founder Pamela Capalad recommended using the debt snowball method. With this method, you pay down the debt with the smallest balance first while paying the minimum on other debts. Then, you’ll pay off the next biggest balance and so on.

“Most people will be able to pay off their debt in half the time using this method,” said Capalad.

Vermont: Not Being Able to Retire/Paying for Education/Paying My Mortgage or Rent

Although Vermont is the best state to get a mortgage loan and residents don’t have to work as many hours as other Americans to afford a monthly mortgage, found recent GOBankingRates studies, the cost of living in Vermont is among the highest in the nation, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center. This might explain why residents are stressed about paying for housing.

Covering high daily costs can also make it harder to find room in a budget to save for retirement or college costs. People need to be careful, however, not to put retirement savings on the back burner to pay for a child’s college education.

“It’s very important to objectively assess whether sacrificing your entire retirement for your kids’ education puts you at personal risk,” said Joe Duran, CEO of financial life management company United Capital.

Washington, DC: Wanting a Nicer Lifestyle

Washington, DC, has a high household income of $69,235, according to 2010-2014 Census Bureau figures. However, you need make more than $80,000 in order to live comfortably in DC. thanks to the high cost of living, found another GOBankingRates study. So if paychecks are being stretched to cover costs, it might explain why residents in the nation’s capital feel the financial stress of wanting a nicer lifestyle.

Read: How Much Money You Need to Live Comfortably in Your City

However, it’s important to consider what a “nicer lifestyle” actually means to you. “You can create a nicer lifestyle without necessarily needing more income — just [be] more mindful of how you spend the income you have,” said Capalad.

Alaska: Paying Off My Debt

Saving money is hard if you’re in debt — and it seems that saving might be especially hard for Alaskans.

Alaska residents have the highest average credit card debt in the nation — $7,706, according to ValuePenguin. They might be relying on credit because the cost of living in the state is among the highest in the nation. In fact, Alaska is one of the top states where people are most likely to live paycheck to paycheck.

North Dakota: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt per household in Nebraska is among the lowest in the nation, according to ValuePenguin. Yet, paying off debt is still the top source of financial stress among the state’s residents surveyed by GOBankingRates.

Matt Becker, founder of fee-only planning practice Mom and Dad Money, suggested you free yourself from debt by signing up for a service such as ReadyforZero, which provides a free repayment plan.

“Being in control will not only help you pay it off sooner, but it will alleviate a lot of stress,” he said.

South Dakota: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

The median household income in South Dakota is below the national median. So, saving money for an emergency might be harder for residents with smaller paychecks.

“With so many competing financial responsibilities, it’s hard to put your emergency fund at the top of your priorities,” Alred said. “But that’s where it should be.”

To have cash to fund emergency savings, he recommended selling what you’re not using.

Delaware: Not Being Able to Retire/Wanting a Nicer Lifestyle

Delaware is one of the few states where residents said not being able to retire is their top source of financial stress. However, more people across the nation should be concerned about whether they’ll be able to retire — a recent GOBankingRates’ survey found that one in three Americans has $0 saved for retirement.

Read: Why Delaware Is the No. 1 State to Retire Rich

To take the stress out of saving money for retirement, Becker recommended focusing on short-term actions you can actually achieve.

“Set up an automatic monthly contribution to your 401k or IRA, no matter how small,” he said. “Then, set a calendar reminder to increase that contribution by 1 percent every six months. Follow that plan over and over again, and you’ll be on your way.”

Montana: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in Montana ($5,283) is lower than the national average, according to ValuePenguin. Still, survey respondents said paying off debt is their No. 1 cause of financial stress.

Not saving enough for emergencies and not being able to retire are the No. 2 causes of financial in this state — an equal number of residents selected these two stressors.

Rhode Island: Lack of Stable Income/Paying Off My Debt

Rhode Island’s unemployment rate of 5.5 percent is higher than the national unemployment rate, according to June 2016 figures from the Bureau of Labor Statics. That might explain why a lack of stable income — along with paying off debt — is the top financial stressor in the state.

Without a stable income, you might find it hard to pay bills and have to rely on credit. If you’re in this situation, Becker said the best thing you can do is minimize your expenses. You can track your spending with an app such as Mint, You Need a Budget software or even a simple spreadsheet.

“Then, tackle one expense at a time, working to reduce or eliminate any monthly costs you don’t need,” he added.

New Hampshire: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency/Paying Off My Debt

Saving money to fund an emergency can be hard when you have debts to pay. The average credit card debt in New Hampshire is higher than the national average — $5,939 versus $5,700, according to ValuePenguin. However, not having an emergency fund can lead to more debt if you have to rely on credit to cover unexpected costs.

To build an emergency fund, start by contributing a small, comfortable amount each month into a savings account, Capalad said. You can increase contributions as your income increases and when you receive windfalls, such as bonuses or tax refunds.

Maine: Not Being Able to Retire/Paying Off My Debt

The median household income in Maine is well below the national median — $48,804 versus $53,482, according to Census Bureau data. So, many of the state’s residents might find it hard to come up with cash to set aside for retirement or pay off debt.

Hawaii: Paying for Education

The annual in-state cost of attending a public four-year college in Hawaii certainly isn’t the highest in the nation at $10,175, according to College Board data. Nonetheless, paying for education is the top source of financial stress among the state’s residents surveyed by GOBankingRates.

To lower the cost of education, Alred recommends taking courses at a more affordable community college, going to school part time while working full time and applying for every single scholarship you can find.

Idaho: Paying for Education

The average tuition and fees for a public four-year institution in Idaho is $6,818, which is lower than the average at schools in the majority of states, according to College Board data. However, the median household income in the state is lower than the national median — which might explain why residents find it tough to pay for education.

“Addressing educational costs can be a significant stressor for families,” said Peg Creonte, senior vice president of Ascensus College Savings. “To combat this, families should consider investing in a 529 plan to help save for future education expenses.”

Funds in a 529 college savings plan can be used to pay for qualified higher education expenses, even at community colleges and vocational schools, she said.

West Virginia: Paying Off My Debt

The median household income in West Virginia is lower than the national median, according to Census Bureau figures. As a result, residents might find it hard to have enough cash to make debt payments.

One way to pay down debt quickly is to get a side hustle to increase your income, Alred said. “Throw all of the extra money toward your debt,” he said.

Nebraska: Paying Off My Debt

Nebraska households have the second-lowest average credit card debt in the U.S. at $4,833, according to ValuePenguin. Yet, paying off debt still is the top source of financial stress for residents in the state.

New Mexico: Paying Off My Debt

New Mexico has the third-highest unemployment rate in the nation, tied with Louisiana and Illinois, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Without a steady income, residents might be relying on credit more or having trouble coming up with the cash to pay the debts they have.

Nevada: Paying Off My Debt

Nevada residents are carrying a slightly heavier debt load than the nation as a whole, which might explain why paying off debt is the No. 1 cause of financial stress in this state. The total debt balance per capita in the state is $47,360 versus a national per capita debt balance of $46,590, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s quarterly report on household debt and credit.

Kansas: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in Kansas is just slightly lower than the national average, according to ValuePenguin. Plus, it takes fewer hours of work per month to afford a monthly mortgage payment in Kansas than in most states, according to a GOBankingRates study. Yet, paying off debt is still the top source of financial stress among residents in the state.

Utah: Paying Off My Debt

Utah residents have to work more hours to afford a monthly mortgage payment than residents in most states, a GOBankingRates study found. And, the average credit card debt is $5,532 — just below the national average of $5,700. The heavy mortgage load in the state coupled with credit card debt might explain why residents are stressed about paying off debt.

Mississippi: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

Mississippi’s median household income of $39,464 is the lowest in the nation, according to Census Bureau figures. With a paycheck well below the national median, it might be hard for residents of this state to come up with cash to cover an emergency.

Arkansas: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

Having enough money to fund an emergency can be tough on a small paycheck. Arkansas has a low median household income of $41,264, according to Census Bureau figures.

One way to start building an emergency fund is to implement a 90-day shopping ban. Then, put all the money you don’t spend into savings, Alred said.

Iowa: Not Being Able to Retire

Iowa is one of just a handful of states where not being able to retire is the top source of financial stress. This stress can come from not knowing how much money you need to retire, said Alred.

To help alleviate some of the stress, he recommended meeting with a financial planner who can walk you through the process of figuring out how much you need to save for the retirement you want.

Connecticut: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

Connecticut’s median household income of $69,899 is well above the national median, according to Census Bureau data. However, a high cost of living in this state means that residents are more likely to live paycheck to paycheck.

Plus, the average credit card debt in Connecticut ($6,494) is among the highest in the nation, according to ValuePenguin. So, residents might have little left over to fund an emergency after covering daily costs and debt payments.

Oklahoma: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

In a state where the median household income is among the lowest in the nation, it’s understandable that residents are stressed about not having enough money to fund an emergency. However, it’s important to start saving money to cover unexpected costs so you don’t have to rely on credit and rack up debt.

Oregon: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in Oregon is slightly higher than the national average — $5,769 versus $5,700, according to ValuePenguin. Plus, residents are burdened by mortgage debt. A GOBankingRates’ study found that Oregon residents have to work more hours each month to afford a monthly mortgage payment than residents in 46 other states.

Kentucky: Paying Off My Debt

The median household income in Kentucky is among the lowest in the nation, according to Census Bureau figures. So, residents might find it hard to stretch their paychecks to cover debt payments on top of everyday expenses.

Louisiana: Paying Off My Debt

Louisiana has one of the highest unemployment rates in the nation, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And, the median household income in the state is among the lowest in the U.S.

Even though the average household credit card debt in Louisiana is several hundred dollars lower than the national average, low wages and high unemployment rates might make it hard for residents to pay off debt.

South Carolina: Paying Off My Debt

Paying off debt is the No. 1 cause of financial stress in South Carolina — as it is in more than half of the other states. One way to tackle debt is through a debt consolidation loan. You can roll several debts into one with a potentially lower interest rate.

Alabama: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in Alabama of $5,548 is lower than the national average, according to ValuePenguin. Yet, residents surveyed in this state where the median household income is nearly $10,000 below the national median consider paying off debt their top source of financial stress.

Colorado: Paying Off My Debt

Colorado residents carry a heavier credit card debt load than most Americans. The average credit card debt in the state is $6,323 versus a national average of $5,700, according to ValuePenguin. No matter how overwhelmed you might be by what you owe, there are ways to avoid being stuck in debt forever.

Minnesota: Paying Off My Debt

Even though the average credit card debt of $5,565 in Minnesota is lower than the national average, the state’s residents still rank paying off debt as their top cause of financial stress.

Minnesotans also carry a lighter mortgage burden than in most states. A GOBankingRates’ study found that Minnesota is one of only 10 states where it takes less than 40 hours of work a month to afford a monthly mortgage payment.

Wisconsin: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

Having enough money to fund an emergency can be tough, especially in a state such as Wisconsin where the median household income is slightly lower than the national median.

Not being able to retire ranked as the No. 2 cause of financial stress in Wisconsin, closely behind not being able to fund an emergency and just ahead of paying of debt — the No. 3 cause of financial stress in this state.

Maryland: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt of Maryland households ($6,448) is about $750 higher than the national average. In fact, it’s the fifth-highest in the U.S., according to ValuePenguin.

If you’re struggling to pay off debt, credit counseling might help. You can find a credit counselor near you at NFCC.org, the website of the National Foundation for Credit Counseling.

Missouri: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

The cost of living is relatively low in Missouri, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center. But, the median household income in the state ($47,764) is lower than the national median, according to Census Bureau figures. So, residents might have a hard time making their paychecks stretch far enough to cover emergency expenses.

Tennessee: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in Tennessee is lower than the national average, according to ValuePenguin. But at $5,492, it’s still a large amount and could explain why Tennessee residents say paying off debt is their top source of financial stress.

Indiana: Paying Off My Debt

Like Tennessee, Indiana has lower-than-average household credit card debt. And, residents have to work fewer hours than residents in all but two states to afford their monthly mortgage payments, a GOBankingRates study found.

Still, paying off debt is the top source of financial stress in this state.

Arizona: Not Having Enough Money to Fund an Emergency

A low household income and a high debt load in Arizona might explain why this state’s residents are concerned about not having enough money to fund an emergency.

Arizona’s median household income of $49,928 is lower than the national median of $53,482, according to the Census Bureau. And the state’s total debt balance per capita ($48,030) is higher than the national per capita debt load, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Massachusetts: Not Being Able to Retire/Paying for Education

An equal number of Massachusetts residents surveyed by GOBankingRates said not being able to retire and paying for education are their No. 1 sources of financial stress.

The state’s high cost of living — the third-highest in the nation — might be leaving residents with little to set aside for retirement or college. In fact, a GOBankingRates’ study found that Massachusetts ranks among the bottom half of states for best places to retire rich.

Washington: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in Washington — $6,241 — is higher than in most states. Plus, the mortgage burden in the state is heavy. GOBankingRates found that Washington residents have to work more hours than residents in most states to afford a monthly mortgage payment. These two factors might explain why residents say paying off debt is their primary cause of financial stress.

Virginia: Paying Off My Debt

Virginia residents have the third-highest average credit card debt in the nation — $6,520, according to according to ValuePenguin. That might explain why paying off debt is the top source of financial stress in the state.

New Jersey: Not Being Able to Retire

Not being able to retire is the No. 1 cause of financial stress in New Jersey. However, GOBankingRates found that it’s one of the best states to retire rich. But that has more to do with the state’s high Medicare and Social Security benefits rather than residents’ ability to retire.

Michigan: Paying Off My Debt

Paying off debt is the top source of financial stress in Michigan, even though the average credit card debt is lower than the national average. And, compared with other states, residents don’t have to work as many as hours to afford a mortgage loan.

North Carolina: Paying Off My Debt

The average credit card debt in North Carolina is about $100 below the national average. However, the state’s median household income is lower than the national median, according to Census Bureau figures. That might explain why paying off debt can be a challenge for North Carolina residents.

Georgia: Paying Off My Debt

Like residents in most states, Georgia residents said their top source of financial stress is paying off debt. However, the lack of stable income is a close second.

Ohio: Paying Off My Debt

The total debt per capita in Ohio is lower than the national average. However, this state has the highest per capita student loan debt load among states for which the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has credit data.

If student loan debt is weighing on you, there are several steps you can take to pay off student loans, including refinancing at a lower interest rate and taking advantage of income-based repayment plans.

Pennsylvania: Paying Off My Debt

Like their neighbors in Ohio, Pennsylvania has a lower debt balance per capita than the national average. However, the student loan debt balance per capita in this state is higher than the national average, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

If you have federal student loans, you might qualify for student loan forgiveness if you work in a certain field such as public service.

Illinois: Paying Off My Debt

The total debt balance per capita in Illinois is about on par with the national average — yet, it’s still a hefty $45,010, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. However, Illinois has a higher student loan debt balance per capita and slightly higher credit card debt than the national average.

New York: Paying Off My Debt

New Yorkers don’t have the highest total debt balance per capita. But, many of the state’s residents are behind on their debt payments. The state has the highest percent of balance that’s at least 90 days late among states, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Paying bills late can only add to stress because late fees can pile up. And whether you pay credit accounts on time is one of the most important factors in your FICO score, the credit score most commonly used by lenders to determine whether to lend you money and at what rate.

Read: 21 Traits of Successful Billionaires

Florida: Paying Off My Debt

Florida residents have a smaller total debt balance per capita than the national average. However, they have higher credit card and auto loan debt balance per capita than the national average, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Texas: Paying Off My Debt

Although paying off debt is the No. 1 financial stressor in Texas, this state has a smaller total debt balance per capita than the national average. The per capita debt in Texas is $38,830 compared with a per capita debt of $46,590 in the U.S., according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Texas is also one of the few states for which the New York Fed has data that has higher auto loan debt balance per capita than student loan debt.

California: Paying Off My Debt

It’s no surprise that paying off debt is the top cause of financial stress in California. The state has most total debt balance per capita in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s quarterly report.

Total debt balance per capita debt in California was $67,030 as of the first quarter of 2016. The majority of that debt is mortgage debt, followed by student loan and auto loan debt.

Methodology: This GOBankingRates survey posed the question, “Of the following, what is your number 1 cause of financial stress?” to 7,054 people among all 50 states and Washington, DC. Respondents could select one of the following answer options: 1) “Paying off my debt (i.e. credit cards)” 2) “Not being able to retire” 3) “Not having enough money to fund an emergency” 4) “Wanting a nicer lifestyle,” 5) “Paying for education,” 6) “Lack of stable income” or 7) “Paying my mortgage or rent.” Responses were collected through a Google Consumer Survey conducted from July 12, 2016 to July 14, 2016, and responses are representative of the U.S. online population. The survey has a 1.75 percent margin of error.

This article originally appeared on GoBankingRates.

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