MONEY Kids and Money

The Surprising Place Your Kid Should Save His Summer Earnings

Pitcher of lemonade and a money jar
Your teen's summer earnings may not seem like much now, but they can serve as a cornerstone for his retirement 50-odd years in the future. Somos/Veer—Getty Images

Get your teen started off now in a Roth IRA for a big payoff down the road, says financial planner Kevin McKinley.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about how to figure out how much money you need to become financially independent, and how the process could help you teach your kids to reach the same goal.

But talking the talk only goes so far. You can walk the walk by helping them start saving for retirement in…drumroll, please…a Roth IRA.

Why a Roth IRA?

For most younger workers, the Roth IRA is preferable to a traditional IRA for two reasons.

The first is that contributions to a Roth IRA can be withdrawn at any time for any reason with no taxes or penalties whatsoever. Therefore, that portion of the account can be taken out for other expenses, such as college or a down payment on a house, without a severe cost.

The second reason the Roth IRA rules is that younger workers typically are in a low tax bracket, and therefore don’t need the deduction that a traditional IRA provides. But once they get to retirement, all the money in the Roth can generally be withdrawn with no taxes at all.

How much your kid can save

Children of any age can open a Roth IRA account—as long as they have legitimate earned income. Flipping burgers and bagging groceries certainly counts, but so does self-employment like babysitting and yard work, especially if it’s done for someone other than you.

Just make sure to keep track of what your kid makes so you know how much can be deposited in to the Roth IRA. For 2014 the contributions to a Roth IRA are limited to the lesser of the kid’s earnings, or $5,500.

Technically, for the 2104 tax year, the money doesn’t have to be deposited until April 15, 2015, the usual deadline for the federal income tax filing.

What you can do to encourage him

Congratulations to you—and your child—if you can convince her straightaway to put her hard-earned paychecks into an account that isn’t meant to be tapped for another 50 years.

But even if you can’t immediately get your teen into the savings habit, you may be able to motivate her by using some of your own money. The money for the Roth IRA doesn’t necessarily have to come from her. She can spend her earnings, and you can deposit into the Roth on her behalf.(Just remember that your deposits then become her money, and she’s free to do with it as she pleases once she reaches adulthood.)

Also, keep in mind that the source of the deposit to your child’s Roth IRA doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition. You may want to tell your kid that you will match every dollar she contributes with one of your own.

For further motivation, try showing your child how time can turn a relatively-small amount of money into a small (or large) fortune.

For instance, let’s say you and your child deposits $5,000 into a Roth IRA when he’s 15 years old, and it grows at a hypothetical annual rate of 6% per year.

By the time he’s 65 (and it will happen sooner than he thinks), the account would be worth over $92,000.

But if he has the earnings and discipline required to set aside $5,000 in to the same account every year until he turns 65, the Roth IRA will provide him with a tax-free total of $1.6 million.

And if that doesn’t get his attention, no amount of walking and talking will.

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Kevin McKinley is a financial planner and owner of McKinley Money LLC, a registered investment advisor in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He’s also the author of Make Your Kid a Millionaire. His column appears weekly.

Read more from Kevin McKinley

Four Reasons You Shouldn’t Be Saving for College Just Yet

Yes, You Can Skip a Faraway Wedding

The Simple Formula That Can Help You Achieve Financial Independence

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