MONEY home improvement

How to Set a Landscaping Budget—and Stick to It

The right landscaping adds value to your property, so before you undertake a landscaping redo, understand your needs and make a proper budget.

Designing a landscape that suits your home, as well as your budget, is an important part of home ownership. It’s important to ensure you have the type of yard that fits your current needs, as well as establishing critical curb appeal for future sale. Regardless of the size of your property, beautiful landscaping adds value to your property. Before undertaking a landscaping renovation or upgrade, spend some time assessing your wants and needs and understanding the cost drivers for a project of this size.

Landscaping budget basics

A budget is an itemized description of anticipated expenses for your landscaping project. Your budget should be realistic, organized, detailed and easily to track. Establishing a budget helps you determine what is required to complete the landscaping project and should include how much each item should cost.

Effective budgeting is more than just planning. A responsible homeowner will monitor the budget closely and be conscious of the investment, regardless of who is actually performing the work. Build in some flexibility wherever possible to ensure your project can handle the unexpected. Depending on the size of the lot and the complexity of the landscaping project, a landscaping budget spreadsheet need not be lengthy, but it should be detailed enough to be reasonably accurate.

How to start your landscaping budget

Planning your landscape can be an enjoyable part of the pre-planning phase. Bringing these visions to reality starts with research to find the actual costs of what you want included based on the size of your property. Start with a general list of what projects you’d like to complete such as:

  • irrigation installation
  • lawn servicing
  • tree removal or limb pruning
  • general maintenance
  • new plants and shrubbery
  • excavation
  • water features
  • new dirt or mulch
  • hardscaping projects like patios, pathways, rockery or arbors
  • organic garden set-up
  • edible plants
  • fences or retaining walls
  • address drainage issues
  • flower bed preparation and planting
  • exterior lighting
  • outdoor entertainment features like firepit, built-in seating, or outdoor kitchens

In addition to specific actions, make a priority list of which areas of the property you’d like to focus on. Depending upon your land, you may want to improve the entire front, back and side yards or you may just want to focus on one area outside. Breaking up the landscaping renovation into different stages is an especially good idea if you have a limited budget or a large amount of land.

Keeping your landscape project on budget

Once you’ve put together your initial list of needs, make a note of who will be doing the work. If you plan on doing most of the work yourself, be realistic about your time and skills. If you have time to shop around and work on the weekends, your budget can be spread out over a longer period of time. You can also save money by waiting for sales or purchasing items in the off season.

If you plan on hiring a professional to do most or part of the work, have a clear idea of what you need them to do. Your pre-planning meetings should be detailed and thorough and allow time for any drawings to be made. Your professional will advise you to how long this project will take to complete and provide you with a quote or bid for the project. Once you’ve signed off on the bid, and signed a contract for the work, the project can begin.

Regardless of who is performing the work, keep track of expenses. For you DIY landscaping, this could mean keeping a simple spreadsheet of costs or tool rentals. For your professional, your quote should detail all expenses and fees. If any changes are made during the course of the project, a change work order form should be completed and signed by both parties. This ensures a paper trail is in place tracking all changes and costs. Check in regularly with your landscaper to ensure that the project is going according to plan and ask to be alerted to any potential changes in the budget. Be aware of professionals who may also charge for their consultation time. They should alert you if any of your phone calls or consulting appointments are costing you money.

Other cost drivers for landscaping projects

Depending upon the scope of your project, you may need to obtain a permit. Some fence designs, retaining walls or excavation, for example, may require a permit. It is the responsibility of the homeowner to ensure that the proper paperwork is filed and you can check with your local department of development and planning to see if your particular project requires a permit. Or check with your professional, who can obtain the permit on your behalf.

Delays in materials or shipping can increase your costs. If you budget is flexible you may be able to afford overnight shipping or change your material selection. Seasonal changes may also affect your budget, especially if you are trying to hire a professional during their busiest time of year.

More from Porch:
Keeping Your Workshop Remodel on Schedule
The Golden Triangle: Designing an Efficient Kitchen
How to Keep Pest Control Costs Under Control

Anne Reagan is the editor-in-chief of home improvement website Porch.com.

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