The iPhone X for the Halloween Parade in NYC

Here are all the new photo features and improvements coming with the release of Apple's new iPhone X

iPhone X Halloween Portraits

Delphine Diallo For TIME

The iPhone X Put to the Test in These Village Halloween Parade Portraits

Photos by Delphine Diallo | Text by Josh Raab

For the quirky, the cheeky, and the eccentric, Halloween is the best time of the year. For the curious, the cutting edge, and the tech fans, it also tends to mean the release of Apple’s latest iPhone.

That’s true again this year. When the iPhone X hits stores on Nov. 3, it will come with a number of new features, including facial recognition, a larger screen, and wireless charging. The dual-lens camera will also be improved significantly.

Delphine Diallo For TIME

The iPhone X’s wide-angle and telephoto lenses both shoot 12 megapixel images. The wide angle lens will allow for an f/1.8 aperture, while the telephoto lens will have an f/2.4 aperture. Dual optical image optimization, meanwhile, will reduce motion blur.

The wider aperture and image stabilization give the iPhone X an edge over the recently released iPhone 8 Plus. These improvements should translate to stronger photos overall, but users should notice crisper portraits and better low-light images in particular.

Delphine Diallo For TIME

The iPhone X also comes with new improvements to Apple’s Portrait Mode, which isolates a picture’s subject and artificially blurs the background, mimicking high-end cameras. A new feature called Portrait Lighting imitates studio lighting setups, with options for contour lighting, stage lighting and more. The lighting effects can be applied either while taking an image or after the fact.

Delphine Diallo For TIME

TIME put the iPhone X through the photographic paces during New York City’s annual Village Halloween Parade on Oct. 31. Photographer Delphine Diallo set out to photograph the event equipped with only the iPhone X and, at times, a portable light. Diallo used the iPhone X’s new camera features to document the lively participants and the many curious onlookers who have been drawn to the event for more than 40 years.

Delphine Diallo For TIME

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