TIME Heart Disease

Mississippi Men Learn About Heart Disease — At the Barber

172251811
John Sigler—Getty Images

Barbershops may be the new doctor's office, at least in Mississippi where African American men are learning about high blood pressure...while they get their hair cut

Barber shops and hair salons are great community hubs where residents gather for both grooming and gossip. So public health experts in the Mississippi Delta have decided to exploit these social meccas to connect with groups that don’t often see health care providers, including African American men.

Heart disease and stroke, for example, disproportionately affect this population of men, partly due to genetics, and partly due to lifestyle behaviors. But in places like the Mississippi Delta region, these men also do not get regular heart disease screenings. They do, however, go to barbershops for trims and to catch up on community news. So the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is funding a barbershop initiative called Brothers (Barbers Reaching Out to Help Educate Routine Screenings) located throughout the Mississippi Delta, where heart disease and stroke are the second and fourth leading causes of death in black men.

The Mississippi Department of Health spent a year recruiting and training barber shop workers on how to read a blood pressure screening, and discuss risk factors. During appointments, barbers talk to their clients about heart health, take their blood pressure, and refer them to a physician if they need further counseling. Recruitment was, and continues to be a challenge since some of the barbers were on board with the benefits of educating their clients, but worried about whether the program would hurt their business.

So far, thought, the barbers are being pretty persuasive. The project, which involves 14 barbershops that have so far served 686 men, just released its first set of data. Only 35% of the customers said that they had a doctor and 57% did not have health insurance. Among the men who received blood pressure readings, 48.5% had prehypertension, and 36.4% had high blood pressure. The findings, published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease, shows that the program provides care to men who need it, as well as gives public health care workers a better idea of how prevalent heart disease is in the region, and how many patients are in need of medical care. The next step for the researchers is to create a community health worker network that could introduce these men to the health care system and help them navigate more regular screenings and better treatment of their condition.

Shifting health care from the clinic to the community isn’t a new idea; in some areas, health screenings and education are conducted in churches. But the faithful are a select group, and the study’s lead author says it’s important to bring services to hard-to-reach populations, such as young black men, to where they are. “We realized in our standard community health screenings–which were happening in churches–that we were not reaching adult black men,” says lead study author Vincent Mendy, an epidemiologist at the Mississippi State Department of Health. “We think the best way to reach them is through barbershops.” The program is part of a partnership between the CDC and the Mississippi State Department of Health, and is funded through September 2015.

Mendy is hopeful that the program will reach more men and bring them into treatment, since a similar 2011 initiative in Texas, funded by the National Institutes of Health, found that barbers helped to lower blood pressure in a population of African American men by 20%. Based on this growing body of research, the CDC is considering relying on community health workers to help improve the health of minority groups that have a disproportionate risk of disease and death in the U.S. — but are often outside of the health care system. Barbershops aren’t clinics, but they do seem to be a good place to get health messages across.

TIME Nutrition

Why Your Bottled Water Contains Four Different Ingredients

Getty Images

Water you buy in the store is not just hydrogen and oxygen. Here's why food producers add all those extra ingredients.

Next time you reach for a bottle of water on store shelves, take a look at the ingredient list. You’re likely to find that it includes more than just water.

Popular bottled water brand Dasani, for example, lists magnesium sulfate, potassium chloride, and salt alongside purified water on its Nutrition Facts label. SmartWater contains calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, and potassium bicarbonate. Nestle Pure Life’s list includes calcium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and magnesium sulfate. And these are just a few brands. Bottled water companies are purifying water, but then they’re adding extra ingredients back.

None of this should be cause for health concerns, says Marion Nestle, professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health and professor of Sociology at New York University. The additives being put into water are those naturally found in water and the quantities of these additives are likely too small to be of much significance. “If you had pure water by itself, it doesn’t taste have any taste,” says Bob Mahler, Soil Science and Water Quality professor at the University of Idaho. “So companies that sell bottled water will put in calcium, magnesium or maybe a little bit of salt.”

Taste tests have revealed that many people find distilled water to taste flat as opposed to spring waters, which can taste a bit sweet. Minerals offer a “slightly salty or bitter flavors,” which is likely why low mineral soft waters have a more appealing taste, Nestle wrote in her book What To Eat.

Many of the ingredients that are added to bottled water occur naturally in tap water and in our daily diets. Potassium chloride, for example, is a chemical compound that is often used as a supplement for potassium, which benefits heart health and aids normal muscular and digestive functions. Magnesium chloride, magnesium sulfate, and calcium chloride are all inorganic salts.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that Americans reduce current levels of sodium intake by 2,300 mg per day, so you would have to drink a lot of water to make much of a difference, Nestle says. The typical amount of sodium in water averages at around 17 mg per liter.

But just because additives are generally naturally occurring ingredients doesn’t mean that consumers shouldn’t look at labels. If labels show calories, that means sugars have been added. Some bottled waters can be high in sodium, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends only drinking water that contains 20 mg of sodium per liter or less.

The best choice that many water consumers can make may be to just stick to drinking tap water. “To the extent that tap water is clean and free of harmful contaminants,” says Nestle, “it beats everything in taste and cost.”

TIME

8 Ways to Boost Your Metabolism Right Now

Feel like your metabolism is stuck in slo-mo? Coaxing your body to burn calories more efficiently doesn’t require daily Spinning sessions or hours at the weight rack (though being in shape and building more muscle definitely helps). From adding an extra ingredient to your smoothie to watching a funny YouTube video, you can fan your metabolism’s flames in just minutes a day by adopting these research-backed habits.

Add whey protein to your smoothie

When you’re tossing fruit, ice, and other smoothie mix-ins into your blender, take an extra second to add one more metabolism-boosting ingredient—whey protein powder. “Whey protein increases calorie burn and fat utilization, helps the body maintain muscle, and triggers the brain to feel full,” says Paul Arciero, a professor in the Health and Exercise Sciences department at Skidmore College who has studied whey’s effects on the body. All types of protein rev up your metabolism—protein has a thermogenic effect, meaning it makes your body produce more heat and, in turn, burn more calories—but whey may be the most effective non-animal protein. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition revealed that fat oxidation and the thermic effect was greater with whey than with soy or casein.

Health.com: 26 Smoothie Recipes You Need to Try

Drink before you eat

Drinking two glasses of water before every meal helped dieters lose an average of 15.5 pounds (five pounds more than the non-water drinkers) over three months in a study presented at the American Chemical Society’s annual conference. Taking quick hydration breaks throughout the day also boosts your metabolic machinery, says JJ Virgin, celebrity nutritionist and author of The Virgin Diet Cookbook, and research shows staying properly hydrated keeps you feeling energized. Try to consume half your body weight in water ounces, Virgin suggests; a 150-pound person would drink 75 ounces a day.

Don’t stop yourself from fidgeting

When your annoyed coworker tells you you’re bouncing your leg, perhaps you can explain that you’re just doing some non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)—the expert term for fidgeting. Research shows that NEAT may help you burn an additional 350 calories a day. “Small bursts of activity, like running up stairs, pacing while you’re on the phone, or shifting around in your seat all count,” says Tom Holland, an exercise physiologist and author of Beat the Gym. “It adds up quickly, so take advantage of any chance to move more throughout your day.”

Health.com: 24 Fat-Burning Ab Exercises

Brew a cup of coffee

Caffeine’s ability to speed up the central nervous system makes it a powerful metabolism booster. “In addition, coffee beans provide antioxidants and real health value,” says Amy Goodson, RD, a dietitian for Texas Health Ben Hogan Sports Medicine. “Provided your cup is not laden with cream and syrup, coffee can be a great way to give you energy as well as some antioxidants.” Coffee has been shown to improve energy levels during exercise, especially endurance activity, and help people work harder longer, which therefore burns more calories. Drinking coffee after a workout can also be beneficial. Consuming caffeine after exercise increased muscle glycogen by 66% in endurance athletes, enabling them to more quickly replenish energy stores used through exercise, according to a study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Need more caffeine? Swap in green tea

If you’re like an average American and drink three cups of coffee a day, consider swapping in green tea for one of them. In addition to giving you the metabolism-boosting caffeine jolt you crave, green tea is a rich source of antioxidants called catechins. And, in a study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking green tea combined with a total of three hours of moderate exercise a week reduced abdominal fat in subjects over a three-month period. “Unsweetened, brewed green tea was shown to increase calorie burn by about 100 calories per day,” says Michelle Dudash, RD, author of Clean Eating for Busy Families. For best results, Dudash recommends fresh-brewed green tea only—it takes just a couple minutes to make. “Bottled green tea tends to have a lower concentration of the beneficial compounds,” she says, not to mention that many are loaded with added sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Health.com: 12 Surprising Sources of Caffeine

Snack on yogurt

Probiotics, the healthy bacteria found in yogurt, pickles, and other fermented foods like sauerkraut, may help you lose weight—if you’re a woman, shows a new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition. Overweight men and women followed a 12-week weight loss diet; half of the volunteers also took a probiotic pill every day. Women in the probiotic group lost more weight than those in the placebo group and continued to lose weight during the 12-week maintenance period afterward (the probiotic didn’t make any difference for men).

Consuming probiotics in food form has other waist-friendly benefits: “Yogurt, like other full-fat dairy, also has a fatty acid called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) that studies show can improve fat burning,” says Virgin. Avoid fruit-on-the-bottom varieties, which can have as much sugar as a candy bar.

Take a laugh break

Go ahead, minimize your Word documents and Excel spreadsheets. Taking a quick break to look at funny cat videos on YouTube or take a Buzzfeed quiz doesn’t just feel good—you’re also burning calories in the process. A study from the International Journal of Obesity showed a 10 to 20% increase in energy expenditure (calories burned) and heart rate during genuine laughter. This translated to an increase of 10 to 40 calories burned within 10 to 15 minutes of laughter.

Health.com: Best Superfoods for Weight Loss

14 Ways to Boost Your Metabolism Right Now originally appeared on Health.com.

TIME Cancer

HPV Test vs. The Pap Smear: Which Detects Cancer Better?

New studies are supporting the role that HPV tests can play in detecting cervical cancer.

When it comes to detecting cervical cancer, the Pap test has been the gold standard for more than 60 years. But as the role of human papillomavirus virus (HPV) in contributing to the cancer has emerged in recent years, screening for HPV has started to rival the Pap. And last week, a study of more than one million women added to HPV test’s utility; it found that the HPV test was more successful in assessing cervical cancer risk than the Pap smear.

With a Pap smear, health care providers scrape cells from the surface of the cervix and analyze them under a microscope for abnormal ones that could turn in to cervical cancer. The HPV test, on the other hand, detects the presence of two strains of HPV, which is responsible for about 70% of cervical cancer cases.

In the recent study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women with a negative HPV test had half the risk of developing cancer over three years as women who had a negative Pap test, and similar rates to women who were negative on both tests (known as a co-test). Because most cases of cervical cancer are caused by an infection with HPV, women who don’t show signs of the virus are at a very low risk of developing the cancer –even lower than women who have a negative Pap test.

For that reason, says the study’s lead author Julia Gage of the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the National Cancer Institute, “We think that HPV primary screening might be a viable alternative to Pap screening as well as co-testing.”

The potential role of HPV testing as a first line screening tool for detecting cervical cancer is also supported by an April study published in the Lancet that looked at four randomized controlled trials in Europe and concluded that the HPV test was the superior screening method. Other studies in rural populations have also been able to cut down on advanced cervical cancers and deaths using just HPV screening.

That’s why in April, the Food and Drug Administration unanimously approved an HPV DNA test developed by Roche as a primary screening tool for cervical cancer for women ages 25 and older. The test screens for the strains most commonly linked to the cancer — HPV 16 and HPV 18 — as well as for others. Along with the approval, the FDA offered guidelines for how the test should be used, advising that women who test positive for HPV 16 or HPV 18 should have a colposcopy, or a procedure that magnifies the cervix so physicians can take a better look at abnormal cells and take biopsies if needed. If women test positive for other strains of HPV, they should have a Pap test as a follow-up to determine the state of their cells.

Still, while the data appears to be showing that the HPV test is a more accurate predictor of cervical cancer, it’s unlikely it will replace the Pap smear any time soon. “There’s not enough evidence accumulated to have a guideline revision at this point,” says Gage. There’s concern, for example, that HPV tests could lead to more unnecessary and invasive procedures, since just the presence of the virus doesn’t always mean cancer will follow; many cases of infection resolve on their own.

And many physicians have relied on the Pap for so long, that implementation will not be prompt. “I understand that something that’s gospel one year may not be gospel the next, but I still tend to lean towards doing the Pap smear than just an HPV test alone,” says Dr. Mary Jane Minkin, a clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at the Yale School of Medicine.

Most health groups have adopted a similar wait-and-see approach, relying on a combination of Pap and HPV tests. In 2012, for example, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released updated guidelines for cervical cancer screening, advising Pap testing for women between the ages of 21 to 65 every three years, or co-testing with a Pap smear and HPV test every five years for women ages 30 to 65 with normal screening results. Younger women, experts believe, may be more likely to clear HPV infections so wouldn’t benefit as much from regular HPV testing.

Now that studies are suggesting that HPV may be a useful addition, if not replacement, for Pap testing, doctors and their patients may be able to better exploit opportunities to detect and prevent cervical cancer and keep rates of the disease as low as possible.

TIME Infectious Disease

CDC Lab Director In Anthrax Incident Resigns

MED CDC Anthrax
A sign marks the entrance to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta on Oct. 8, 2013. David Goldman—AP

The lab director is now permanently out of the job

The director of the bioterror lab involved in an incident which caused over 80 lab workers to be potentially exposed to anthrax has resigned.

Michael Farrell, head of the Centers for Disease Control’s Bioterror Rapid Response and Advanced Technology Laboratory had submitted his resignation on Tuesday. The resignation was first reported by Reuters and has been confirmed by TIME.

Last month, the CDC reported that procedures to deactivate anthrax when leaving a lab were not followed and that while the workers were protected, the bacteria was passed to other labs. When it was determined that anthrax had not been deactivated, the labs and CDC building were shut down and decontaminated. Lab workers have not contracted the disease.

Last month, Dr. Farrell was reassigned as the CDC conducted its investigation. Earlier this month, CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said the incident was due to a lack of oversight, and that the CDC would increase safety precautions.

 

TIME diabetes

Having The Right Kind of Fat Can Protect Against Diabetes, Study Says

Brown tissue, also known as brown fat
Brown tissue, also known as brown fat Getty Images

People with more "brown fat" were better able to keep blood sugar under control and burn off fat stores

Not all fat is created equal, it seems. When we’re born, we have larger amounts of brown fat, so-called because it contains more dark mitochondria, the cell’s energy factories that pull in glucose and use it as fuel to drive cellular functions. Like a hard-working battery, however, brown fat releases heat as it performs its functions, which is helpful to keep newborn infants warm but gets less useful for adults as we’re better able to regulate our body temperature. So as we get older, this brown fat is gradually lost.

But in a report published in the journal Diabetes, scientists led by Labros Sidossis, professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, found for the first time that adults who retained more amounts of brown fat were better able to keep blood sugar under control and burn off fat stores. Previous studies have linked brown fat to better weight control, but these results also hint that the tissue may be important for managing diabetes.

MORE: How Now, Brown Fat? Scientists Are Onto a New Way to Lose Weight

The researchers measured the brown fat in a small group of healthy men and also tracked how much energy they used while resting, how well they metabolized glucose, and their sensitivity to insulin, which breaks down and controls blood sugar. Because brown fat tends to be activated under cold temperatures, the scientists also measured these factors after the men sat at room temperature, and again after they sat at 65 degrees to 70 degrees F for five to eight hours.

The men who had higher amounts of brown fat – about 70g on average – increased their metabolic rate by 15%, meaning they burned more calories when they were exposed to slightly cooler temperatures, compared to the men with little or no brown fat. That alone, says Sidossis, contributed to burning 300 more calories for these men.

Those with higher brown fat were also able to break down more sugar, leading to less of it in their blood, something that hasn’t been shown before in human studies. If the subjects sat in the cooler room for 24 hours, the researchers found, that would lead to a reduction of 25g of sugar in the blood thanks to their brown fat alone. “That’s significant because if you consider people who have diabetes, they only have about 2g to 3g more sugar in the blood,” says Sidossis.

MORE: Study: Scientists Find a Way to Trigger Fat-Burning Fat

Interest in brown fat has exploded in recent years, and investigators found that adults retain more brown fat than previously thought, on either side of the base of the neck. Activating this fat store has become a popular area of research; so far, cold temperatures are the only reliable way to stimulate it, but others are exploring ways to transform white fat into brown fat. As of yet, experts haven’t found a reliable way to turn brown fat on or off in a reliable and metabolically useful way. Genetics may determine how much brown fat people are born with, but if early research is validated, it may also be possible to modify that amount, either with drugs or by transforming white fat.

MORE: Turn Down the Thermostat, Drop a Few Pounds?

If the results of the current study are confirmed, the need to do so might become more urgent. “Our data suggest that brown fat may function as both anti-obesity and anti-diabetic tissue in humans,” says Sidossis. “And that makes it a therapeutic target in the battle against obesity and chronic disease. Anything that helps in this area, we need to pursue and make sure that if there is potential there, we exploit it.”

TIME Infectious Disease

Sierra Leone’s Chief Ebola Doctor Contracts the Deadly Virus

Symptoms of Ebola include high fevers, diarrhea and vomiting

+ READ ARTICLE

The top doctor fighting Sierra Leone’s deadly ebola outbreak has contracted the virus himself, the country’s government said Tuesday.

Sheik Umar Khan, 39, is leading an assault on the virus that the World Health Organization says has already claimed 632 lives—206 in Sierra Leone alone as of July 17.

The ebola virus is ruthless, with a mortality rate of 90%. Transmitted through direct contact with the body fluid, blood and infected tissue of victims, ebola can easily spread to the health workers working hard to fight it.

“Health workers are prone to the disease because we are the first port of call for somebody who is sickened by disease. Even with the full protective clothing you put on, you are at risk,” Khan said in an interview with Reuters, before displaying the illness.

Khan is credited with treating more than 100 Ebola victims, Reuters reports, and is considered a “national hero” by the nation’s health ministry. The doctor has been moved to a treatment facility run by the medical charity Doctors Without Borders, according to a statement released Tuesday from the president’s office.

The outbreak began in Guinea this February, but has quickly spread across West Africa.

[Reuters]

TIME Food

Fruit Recall Expands Across U.S. Over Listeria Concerns

Trader Joe's and CostCo are among the grocery stores pulling peaches, nectarines, plums and pluots

Grocery stores across the nation are pulling peaches, nectarines, plums and pluots off the shelves after a central California company issued a recall over concerns of a potential listeria contamination. The recall affects popular chains like Costco and Trader Joe’s.

Wawona Packing Co. announced the voluntary recall of fruit shipped between June 1 and July 12 after consulting with the Food and Drug Administration. The president of the company said in a statement that he is not aware of any illnesses caused by the produce so far, but that anyone with peaches, nectarines, plums or pluots recently purchased from those stores should throw it away.

“By taking the precautionary step of recalling product, we will minimize even the slightest risk to public health,” Brent Smittcamp wrote.

Listeria can cause flu-like symptoms including fever, headache, nausea and diarrhea and may be deadly to children and the elderly. It may also cause miscarriage or stillbirth in prgnant women.

Wawona Packing Co. shut down and cleaned their facilities after it discovered the contamination, and new tests are negative for any bacteria.

TIME Research

Survey: Teen Use of Human Growth Hormones Surges

Rate of high schoolers admitting use of synthetic hGH, or performance enhancing drugs, jumps from 5% to 11% in one year

The number of teens using synthetic human growth hormones (hGH) without a prescription have doubled, according to a new survey of high school students.

A survey from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids found that 11% of the 3,705 high schoolers surveyed reported “ever having used” synthetic hGH without a prescription. That’s a jump from the last four years: in 2012 and 2011 the number of teens using hGH was 5%. The survey also found that steroid use among teens went up from 5 to 7%.

African-American and Hispanic teens were the most likely to say they’ve used synthetic hGH, and the researchers found that both boys and girls had claimed to use hGH and steroids without a prescription. The awareness of online steroid and hGH marketing among teens also rose from 17% in 2012 to 22% in 2013, and kids are less likely to think there is a high or moderate risk associated with them compared to earlier years.

The data shows that about one in five teens says they have at least one friend who uses steroids, and another one in five teens say it’s easy to get them.

Prescription and over-the-counter hGH are considered safe for uses that include treatment for muscle deterioration due to HIV/AIDS and longterm treatment for kids of short stature. But as the report points out, some supplement products that are not regulated by the FDA and not safe for teen consumption can make it onto store shelves, and many are sold online.

“The proliferation of commercially available products that are marketed saying they contain synthetic hGH, or promote the natural production of hGH within the body, is staggering,” said Steve Pasierb, president and CEO of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids in a statement.

Teens tend to use synthetic hGH and steroids–which can be injected or taken orally–to improve their athletic performance or physical appearance. The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids encourages parents and coaches to talk to young people about the risks. The group has also collaborated with the Major League Baseball Charities to create a program that teaches young athletes about the dangers of performance-enhancing drugs.

TIME Opinion

Have the Feds Made School Food Worse with Government-Approved Junk?

Vending machine
Getty Images

"Healthy" snacks in schools are seriously lacking in nutrition

Last week I attended the School Nutrition Association’s annual meeting in Boston, a gathering of the nation’s school food service workers. While most of the controversy lately has focused on the federally-required improvements to nutrition standards for school lunches, getting lost in the shuffle are new standards coming online this fall for school snacks and beverages.

These foods are known collectively as “competitive foods” because they compete with the school meal program; think kids eating their lunches out of vending machines. With schools desperate for extra cash, the likes of Coca-Cola and Frito-Lay take full advantage by hawking their unhealthy products to schoolchildren.

This problem caused Congress and the White House to include in its 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act requirements that U.S. Department of Agriculture set nutrition guidelines for foods sold outside the school meal program. (Thanks to a lawsuit filed by the soda lobby some thirty years ago, a court found that USDA had no authority over soda and junk food, and it’s taken this long to correct that decision.)

To help guide USDA, the Institute of Medicine made science-based recommendations to the agency for the best nutritional approach. But as often happens in Washington, what starts out as a public health policy comes out the other end as industry-friendly, watered down rules.

Instead of insisting that schools do right by kids – and the taxpayer-funded school meal program – by removing vending machines altogether, the feds just required a few tweaks to the ingredients. Big Food put its sophisticated R&D departments to work and out came “USDA-compliant” junk food. Several vendors proudly told me that their “healthier” products weren’t even available in stores, as if this were a good thing.

But is it really better now that “reduced fat” Cheetos have replaced regular in schools? Can parents rest easier knowing their kids are buying “whole grain” Pop-Tarts still containing 15 grams of sugar? Can USDA really claim that the “low sugar” line of Gatorade products (called G2) is significantly superior nutritionally, given that they contain artificial sweeteners and dyes?

As I warned in my comments to USDA last year, too narrow a focus on nutrition indicators such as whole grain and levels of sugar and fat would not address the bigger problem with competitive foods: branding. Corporations hawking junk foods and beverages in schools have no problem tweaking a few ingredients as long as they remain in front of the eyeballs of impressionable youngsters. Schools are not only big business, they are essential to ensure brand loyalty for life.

While real food such as fresh produce, along with truly healthy snacks such as dried apples, were also on display in the expo hall, several vendors I spoke to complained about the challenge of being able to compete with the likes of Kellogg’s and PepsiCo on price, given the economies of scale.

Now with the federal government seal of approval on dressed up junk foods, what messages are we sending to children in their place of learning? That Cheetos and Pop-Tarts are great snacks as long as they contain a sprinkling of “whole grains”? That blue-colored Gatorade is an acceptable beverage as long as it contains fake sugars? Some have defended these changes as incremental. OK, but given how hard it was to get the current rules passed (not to mention the ongoing fight over school meals), it’s likely to be a very long time before we see real improvements.

Meanwhile, school kids are now being exposed to deceptive marketing messages on health-washed junk foods, brought to them by mega-corporations who aim to get them hooked on a lifetime of bad eating habits, all courtesy of the federal government.

Michele Simon is a public health lawyer and president of Eat Drink Politics, a corporate watchdog consulting firm.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser