TIME Food & Drink

5 Delicious Breakfasts That Won’t Leave You Hungry

Breakfast smoothie
madlyinlovewithlife—Getty Images/Moment Open

You may have seen reports in the news lately questioning the benefits of breakfast for weight loss, but I’m not ready to sanction skipping. In my experience, eating breakfast strongly supports weight control, and several studies back what I’ve seen in my 15+ years of counseling clients—breakfast fuels your body when you’re most active, and therefore most likely to burn off what you’ve eaten. It also tends to prevent late night overeating, when you’re less active, and more prone to racking up a fuel surplus that feeds fat cells.

Also, weight loss aside, “breaking the fast” is a savvy nutrition strategy, because it’s a chance to fit in servings of produce, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean proteins. Missing that opportunity, particularly day after day, can lead to shortfalls that deprive your body of important health protective nutrients.

Health.com: Best Superfoods for Weight Loss

Eating breakfast, especially one with protein, is also a smart way to build and maintain metabolism-boosting muscle. One recent study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, found that muscle building was 25% greater among people who ate a diet with an evenly distributed protein intake, compared to those who consumed less protein at breakfast, slightly more at lunch, and the majority of their protein at dinner.

Finally, a study published last year from the American Heart Association found that over a 16 year period, regular breakfast skippers had a 27% higher risk of a heart attack or fatal heart disease.

If you’re on board for a daily breakfast, but your biggest barrier is time, here are five tips and tricks to help you create shortcuts, so you can reap the benefits without running late.

Chill your oatmeal
Oatmeal doesn’t have to be served warm. Cook, then chill individual portions, and stash them in the fridge in small containers you can grab, along with a spoon, on your way out the door. Just mix a protein powder (like pea, hemp, or organic whey) into rolled oats, add hot water, stir, fold in fresh fruit, cinnamon, and nuts, and chill. Or skip the protein powder, and mix the oats, fruit, cinnamon, and nuts into nonfat organic Greek yogurt, and chill to make a grab-n-go mueslix.

Health.com: 20 Snacks That Burn Fat

Hard boil it
Many of my clients enjoy omelets on the weekends, but feel like an egg-based breakfast takes too much time during the week. For a make-ahead option, prep hard boiled organic eggs on a Sunday for the upcoming week. While you’re making dinner, take a few extra minutes to whip up a simple egg salad for breakfast the next morning. Mix chopped egg with either guacamole or pesto, diced or shredded veggies, and a small scoop of cooked, chilled quinoa or brown rice. Grab a portion with a fork in the a.m., and you’re good to go.

Have dinner for breakfast
It may seem odd to chow down on a garden salad topped with lentils or salmon at 8 am, but who says breakfast meals have to look different than lunch or dinner? Many of my clients make double portions in the evening, and eat seconds for breakfast the next day. Give it a try – you may just find that warmed up stir fry, veggie “pasta,” or a crisp entrée salad is your new favorite way to start the day.

Health.com: 25 Surprising Ways to Lose Weight

Pre-whip your smoothie
Smoothies are pretty fast, but I know that when you’re running late, just tossing ingredients into a blender and pressing a button can require more time than you can spare. If that tends to be the case, blend up a smoothie just before bed, stash it in a sealed to-go jug in the fridge, grab it on your way out the door, and shake it up before sipping.

Make a meal out of snack foods
It’s perfectly OK to cobble together a breakfast from an assortment of snack foods, including veggies with hummus and whole grain crackers, or trail mix made from nuts or seeds, unsweetened preservative-free dried fruit, and a whole grain cereal you can eat with your hands. Bon (breakfast) appetit!

Health.com: 10 High-Protein Breakfast Recipes

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, and privately counsels clients in New York, Los Angeles, and long distance. Cynthia is currently the sports nutrition consultant to the New York Rangers NHL team and the Tampa Bay Rays MLB team, and is board certified as a specialist in sports dietetics.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

TIME LGBT

CDC Survey Finds 1.6% of Adults Identify as Gay

Pride Week 2014
People carrying a giant rainbow flag in New York City's Pride Parade Stacey Bramhall—Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Another 0.7% identified as bisexual, and 1.1% said "something else" or didn't answer

Correction appended July 22.

For the first time in 57 years the Centers for Disease Control’s National Health Information Survey has surveyed adults on their sexual orientation, and the results published Tuesday show that 1.6% of adults aged 18 or over identified as gay, while another 0.7% identified as bisexual.

The figures were slightly lower than the findings from previous surveys, which had estimated that the LGBT population comprised 3.4 to 4% of the population.

An additional 1.1% of respondents identified as ‘‘something else,’’ stated ‘‘I don’t know the answer,’’ or refused to provide an answer.

The CDC said its statistics would help researchers to identify and address health disparities between gay and straight adults. The report identified elevated levels of smoking and drinking among respondents who identified as gay, as well as a higher likelihood of meeting federal fitness guidelines.

Correction: The original version of this story incorrectly attributed the data to the wrong source. The survey was undertaken by the Centers for Disease Control’s National Health Information Survey.

TIME Genetics

How Our Social Networks Impact Our Health

dv708017
A new study says we may be genetically similar to our friends Digital Vision.—Getty Images

We share more than similar interests with our friends, we share genetics too

We might think we pick our pals based on who will best complement us—the old “opposite attracts” adage—but there may be something else at play. A new study published in the journal in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States (PNAS) shows we are more genetically similar to our friends than to strangers. In fact, we’re about as genetically equivalent to our friends as we are our fourth cousins.

Though the latest findings were primarily reserved to a group of white people of European origin, the researchers say their findings suggest there is a genetic factor at play beyond physical appearance. Though the researchers say we only share about 1% of our genes with our friends, these underlying markers may make noteworthy patterns when it comes to who we decide to spend our time with, and could even influence our health.

The study is the second to recently show that the people we are closest to are also genetically similar to us. In May, another study published in PNAS found that people also tend to be genetically similar to their spouses. But why?

These questions are central to the work of researchers, James Fowler, a professor of medical genetics and political science at the University of California, San Diego, and Dr. Nicholas Christakis, a social scientist at Yale University. The pair have been building a growing body of research about why we choose our friends, and what evolutionary benefits these choices might have.

“Sharing genes with friends appears to enhance your utility to them,” says Dr. Christakis. “Consider the hypothetical example of speech. If you evolve the capacity to speak, its use to you is greatly enhanced if you form ties with others who have evolved the same capacity.” On the other hand, the researchers found that we tend to hang out with people whose immune system make up is different from ours, which also makes genetic sense, since evolutionarily we don’t want to be susceptible to the same illnesses as our best friend or partner. We could pass it to each other, and then who takes care of who?

In the past, the researchers have looked at how social contagion can spread generosity and have reported thar people are more likely to light up a cigarette if their friends do. And in a 2007 study, the pair showed that friends can influence our weight more than genetics or family members, showing that when a study participant’s friend become obese, there was a 57% greater chance that the participant would also become obese too. They believe it’s not just that we share lifestyle behaviors with our friends, but that friends change our opinions on what we believe to be appropriate social behavior. Conversely, friends could also help us stay on a weight loss plan for the same reasons. The researchers also show that social networks could also have the potential to predict epidemics given that most are set up in a similar way, where certain people are more connected and popular than others, and subsequently more likely to come in contact with disease.

In earlier studies on friendship and genetics, Christakis and Fowler suggested that genetics can influence social behavior in networks of friends, even impacting whatever predispositions those friends already have. For example, if someone is genetically predisposed to alcoholism, and they end up associating with people of similar genotypes who are more likely to have alcohol available, that could be a problem for them. But on the other hand, if that same person chooses a group of friends with a different make-up, alcohol may not be frequently present, and their predisposition remains un-triggered.

That means friendships might modify the way our own genes are expressed, the authors propose. Meaning human evolution is not just limited to the influence of physical and biological environments, but social ones as well.

TIME Food & Drink

6 Food Industry Tricks You Don’t Know About

Apples
Arx0nt—Getty Images/Moment Open

Mind your menus!

The process of getting that apple on your plate sounds simple enough: farmer picks apple, apple gets loaded on a truck and shipped off to the grocery store where it lands in your cart. Well, not quite. In fact, your food goes through a lot to make it to you, from being treated with antibiotics to getting a chlorine bath and a wax coating. Many of these steps are no big deal (and we want to silence any fears you may have about them), but some are bad for your health and others huge money wasters.

Health.com: 30 Healthy Foods That Could Wreck Your Diet

Produce gets a wax coating
To prevent bruising, mold growth, and dehydration in storage, some fruit and veggies (apples, cucumbers) are coated with a drop or two of food-grade wax. Your body doesn’t digest them, and there’s no reason to avoid eating them, says Luke LaBorde, PhD, associate professor of food science at Penn State University. If you want to avoid waxed foods anyway, the FDA doesn’t require them to be labeled as such, so look for signs that say they’ve been coated (a suspicious shine is your first clue). To do so, don’t peel your produce-much of the fiber and phytonutrients are located in or just underneath the skin, says Joan Salge Blake, RD, nutrition professor at Boston University and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Instead, wash with a bit of soap and water.

Health.com: 26 Quick, Healthy Juice and Smoothie Recipes

Salmon is made pinker
The salmon you see at the fish counter almost always sports a bright pinkish-orange hue, but in fact, salmon is naturally a greyer shade. The swimmers take on their classic coloring in one of two ways: wild-caught salmon eat krill, while farm-raised salmon are fed pigment pellets. But don’t let that stop you from buying farmed fish. Though wild-caught salmon is technically better for you than farmed-it naturally contains half the fat, and is slightly higher in zinc, iron, and potassium-it’s three to four times pricier. “Whether farm-raised or wild, there are so many benefits of eating salmon, namely its rich source of omega 3 fatty acids that we don’t get enough of,” says Blake. Buy whatever is on sale and aim for two servings of fatty fish a week.

Health.com: 20 Healthy Salmon Recipes

Some oranges are dyed
Believe it or not, the dye Citrus Red No. 2 is sprayed on some Florida oranges early in the season to brighten their coloring. These oranges are usually used for juicing, but some end up on grocery store shelves. The dye is FDA-approved and used in small concentrations, but the Center for Science in the Public Interest warns this dye is related to health risks, including cancer, in lab animals. (It’s not allowed to be used on California oranges.) Bags of these oranges need to include a label that says color has been added. The dye still isn’t meant for eating, so don’t make candied orange peel or zest them for cooking.

Health.com: 12 Foods With More Vitamin C Than Oranges

Actually, tons of foods are dyed
Many foods are dyed to appear healthier or more appetizing. Caramel color, for example, is often added to wheat or pumpernickel breads to make them look like they contain more wheat than they do. The same colorant is used in some roast beef deli meats for a beefier look. Meanwhile, yellow dyes are added to pickles so the spears appear more vibrant. They dyes are usually safe to consume, but when you spot them on an ingredients label, take it as a sign that the food may also harbor other ingredients commonly found in highly processed foods, like added sodium and sugar, says New York City registered dietitian Marjorie Nolan Cohn, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Olive oil may be mixed with a cheaper variety
Extra virgin olive oil has come under fire for not actually being olive oil. Many bottles are mixed with cheaper oils like soybean or canola, according to Consumer Reports, and shipped to the United States where you pay a premium price. In addition to wasting your money, you’re also losing out on the heart-health perks of the monounsaturated fats you’d find in pure olive oil, says Cohn.

Chicken is given a bath
The journey a chicken takes from the farm to your kitchen table is not pretty. After slaughter, warm chickens need to be cooled down, so they’re placed in a big tank of cold water and a sanitizer, like chlorine, to control harmful bacteria and contamination, explains Don Schaffner, PhD, of the department of food science at Rutgers University. The FDA and USDA say this process is safe, Schaffner says, but you can avoid chickens that have been treated this way by choosing air-chilled poultry.

One not-so-healthy thing some manufacturers do to your chicken: inject saltwater into raw meat to enhance its flavor. Considering most Americans consume far more sodium than they should, you’ll want to read nutrition labels carefully-unaltered chicken contains 40 to 70 milligrams of sodium per 4-ounce serving, while injected chickens pack in 300 milligrams or more.

READ MORE: 12 Food-Industry Tricks That Undermine Clean Eating on Health.com

TIME Cancer

Breast Cancer Drug Has a Surprising New Application, Study Finds

An early study shows that gel-based tamoxifen may be as effective as the oral drug, and have fewer side effects

Tamoxifen is a mainstay of breast cancer treatments: it blocks the effects of the female hormone estrogen on the breast, inhibiting estrogen’s tendency to encourage breast tissue to grow uncontrollably. Now, Dr. Seema Khan, professor of surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, reports in Clinical Cancer Research that putting the drug in a gel, and applying it directly to the breast tissue, where it needs to work, may have merit.

Doctors generally prescribe tamoxifen for women diagnosed with early breast cancer, including very early-stage ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), to prevent recurrent growths. But the drug has also been linked to an increased risk of stroke, blood clots and cancers in other tissues, including the uterus. That’s why more women, including those who have not yet had cancer but are at high risk for the disease could benefit from the drug but are reluctant to take it.

MORE: Why Mammograms Are Less Effective Among Breast Cancer Survivors

Dr. Khan’s study was small—only 26 women—but it provides proof that the principle of applying tamoxifen directly on the breast may be worth investigating. All of the women were diagnosed with DCIS, which generally does not spread. But 30% of DCIS can recur even after surgery and proper treatment, so most women are prescribed tamoxifen. In the current study, about half of the women in the study were randomly assigned to take the oral form of the drug, while the other half were given doses of a tamoxifen gel to apply directly to the breast tissue for six to 10 weeks before their surgery. Khan analyzed the breast tissue after surgery to study markers for tumor growth, and conducted blood tests for levels of tamoxifen metabolites as well.

At the end of the study, the women in both groups showed similar decreases in tumor-related proteins, but blood levels of tamoxifen were five times lower among the women using the gel than those taking the oral pill. That, says Dr. Khan, suggests that the major side effects of the drug, which occur in the blood and other reproductive organs, may be largely avoided if women use the gel.

MORE: High-Tech 3D Mammograms Probably Saved This Woman’s Life

“Our study showed that applying the drug through the breast skin leads to high concentrations in the breast and low concentrations in the rest of the body,” she says. “The biological effect on the breast is consistent with the benefit of oral tamoxifen, so for that reason, we hope that this kind of approach would make preventive medication more acceptable to women with non-invasive breast cancer and how may be at high risk of developing breast cancer.”

Dr. Khan says that the breast may be uniquely designed for such transdermal therapy, since it is essentially an appendage of the skin, with its own internal lymphatic circulation. That may keep things applied to the breast skin within the breast tissue, and could explain the higher concentrations of tamoxifen metabolites she and her team found after the gel applications.

Still, she says that the small number of participants in the study means more research is needed to confirm the results. Right now, the gel version is not available. The company that provided the experimental doses for the study stopped making that formulation, so Dr. Khan is studying a related, similar metabolite called endoxifen that may have similar cancer-fighting effects on breast tissue.

If the strategy proves effective, it’s possible that cancer treatments, or at least breast cancer treatments, may become useful in preventing cancer as well, as more women at high risk who have yet to be diagnosed with the disease take advantage of them. Applying a gel with relatively few side effects may help more women to eliminate small tumors before they have a chance to grow. And if other types of drugs can be used on the skin as well, that could significantly broaden the therapies available to women looking for ways to prevent the disease.

“For high-risk women who need better prevention strategies, delivering the drug to the breast is a very desirable solution,” says Dr. Khan.

TIME Brain

To Prevent Alzheimer’s, Diet and Exercise Are Effective, Large Study Shows

In a groundbreaking study that looked at how diet, exercise and other non-drug interventions affect cognitive decline, researchers see some hope for relatively easy dementia-fighting strategies

+ READ ARTICLE

No one believes that a disease as complicated as Alzheimer’s can be warded off by an apple a day or by faithfully hitting the weight room. But a breakthrough study presented Sunday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference shows that after just two years, people who underwent lifestyle interventions showed improvements in their mental functions, including in memory, executive function and speed tests of their cognitive skills.

Dr. Miia Kivipelto from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden knew that several studies have linked some lifestyle behaviors, such as exercise and a healthy diet, as well as being more socially active, to less cognitive decline and stronger scores on memory and organizational tests. But it wasn’t clear whether people who ate better, exercised more and had more friends also shared something else in common that could explain their ability to slow down dementia symptoms.

So Kivipelto conducted one of the first studies to randomly assign 1,260 older individuals at high risk of developing Alzheimer’s to a lifestyle intervention or to normal health care, to see if the behaviors linked to better brain health actually helped to stave off intellectual decline. “We were surprised that were able to see a clear difference already after two years,” says Kivipelto. She was especially pleased to see the effect since the control group also received adequate and appropriate health care. “We thought that two years may not be enough, but the multi-domain approach seems to be an effective way of doing something to protect memory.”

MORE: New Understanding on Understanding Alzheimer’s

All of the participants, part of the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) study, had some risk factor for developing dementia, including their age, education, and poor heart-health profile. Half were randomly assigned to get an intensive lifestyle makeover, with both group and individual nutrition advice, an exercise trainer, and a nurse or physician who made sure they took their medications. In addition, these volunteers benefited from a social support system. The other half received appropriate health care, but not at the intensive level the intervention group did, and without the social support of their fellow participants.

MORE: New Criteria May Change Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

After just two years, the group that group that got the lifestyle makeover were in much better shape.

MORE: Study: Brain Scans Help Predict Alzheimer’s Disease Early

She and her team plan to continue following up with the participants in another seven years, to see if the effect remains. But she is aware that sticking with a lifestyle plan like the one in the study is a challenge, and says that any such program needs to incorporate ways of keeping patients motivated to comply. That’s why social support may be an important part of any such plan; in this study, for example, if participants missed exercise sessions, others called to find out why they were absent, cementing a pact to adhere to the new behaviors.

Kivipelto also recognizes that genetic factors can play a role in cognitive decline and risk of memory loss, but she says there may be a role for lifestyle interventions in helping people who may be at high risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease—before their symptoms start.

“These findings show that prevention is possible, and that it may be good to start early,” she says. “With so many negative trials for Alzheimer’s drugs reported lately, it’s good that we may have something that everyone can do now to lower their risk.”

 

TIME neuroscience

A ‘High’ From Marijuana Is Really the Opposite in Your Brain

Daily Life In South Africa
A youth smokes marijuana in Soweto township, near Johannesburg, on July 2, 2013 Christopher Furlong—Getty Images

Marijuana dulls your response to dopamine

A new study suggests marijuana blunts the brain’s reaction to dopamine, making users less responsive to the chemical responsible for feelings of reward and pleasure.

In the study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers studied the brains of 24 marijuana abusers — that is, people who smoked multiple times a day — and how they reacted to methylphenidate, a stimulant often used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy. Using personality tests and brain imaging, the researchers found the pot users had blunted behavioral, cardiovascular and brain responses to methylphenidate compared with control participants. Marijuana abusers scored lower on tests of positive emotional activity and higher on negative emotional reactions.

The researchers believe that pot not only dampens the brains’ dopamine reaction to stimulants but also influences the area of the brain involved in reward processing. The participants had lower reward sensitivity, higher levels of irritability, and likely more depression and anxiety.

The researchers conclude that the way pot interferes with the brain may contribute to drug cravings. And that a “high” is really the opposite in the brain.

TIME Exercise/Fitness

Athletes Should Not Play With Head Injuries, Say Doctors

Christoph Kramer of Germany receives a medical treatment during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Final match between Germany and Argentina on July 13, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro.
Christoph Kramer of Germany receives a medical treatment during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Final match between Germany and Argentina on July 13, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro. Shaun Botterill—FIFA/Getty Images

Germany’s decision to let midfield Christof Kramer keep playing in the World Cup final yesterday after being slammed in the head was understandable—if this were 1962, anyway. Back then, a little concussion wasn’t seen as much of a big deal.

That’s not true anymore, and given the fact that everyone from kids’ coaches to the NFL (if grudgingly) recognize that even mild head injuries can have serious consequences, that decision looks close to insane—especially given that Kramer “looked as if he was on another planet and had to be helped off the field,” as TIME’s Bill Saporito observed.

Of course, it’s possible that the German team didn’t realize that this sort of thing can cause permanent brain damage. Or maybe they think that what applies to American football is irrelevant to real football. Except that studies have shown that soccer players are equally at risk.

Clearly, they didn’t read the editorial in The Lancet Neurology published the day before the game reminding coaches and team officials that “cerebral concussion is the most common form of sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the long-term effects of repeated concussions may include dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and other neurological disorders.” The decision to let players continue in a game, wrote these learned medical experts, should be made solely by doctors.

It turns out that FIFA doesn’t have any clear rules about what to do in case a player suffers an apparent concussion. But the fact that Kramer stayed in the game, no matter how important a World Cup final match might be, was at best highly questionable. “I can’t remember very much but it doesn’t matter now,” the dazed player reportedly said after the game was over.

If the medical professionals are right about how serious concussions can be, Kramer and his teammates might well have a different take on things a few years down the road.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

Stressful Days Can Slow Your Metabolism, Study Says

Denny's waitress Tahmina Najemyar delivers free Grand Slam breakfasts to customers on February 3, 2009 in Emeryville, California.
Denny's waitress Tahmina Najemyar delivers free Grand Slam breakfasts to customers on February 3, 2009 in Emeryville, California. Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

Why you shouldn't reward yourself with a donut after a long day

You might think that on a high-intensity stressful day would cause you to burn more calories, but research shows you’d likely be wrong.

Women who ate a high-fat meal after they were stressed burned calories more slowly, according to a new study.

Our bodies metabolize slower under stress, but the types of food we crave when we are stressed or depressed tend to be very high in fat and sugar. New research published in the journal Biological Psychiatry suggests how that combination of factors could result in significant weight gain.

Researchers from Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center interviewed 58 women about stressors they experienced the day before, such as arguments with spouses or trouble with kids, before giving them a meal of eggs, turkey sausage, biscuits and gravy containing 930 calories and 60 grams of fat.

The women then wore masks which were able to measure their metabolism by calculating inhaled and exhaled airflow of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The researchers also measured the women’s blood sugar, triglycerides (cholesterol), insulin and the stress hormone cortisol.

The researchers found that women who reported being stressed out during the prior 24 hours burned 104 fewer calories than the women who were not stressed. That effect could add up to 11 extra pounds gained over a year of stress-eating, they concluded.

The women who were stressed had higher levels of insulin, which contributes to how the body stores fat, and can slow down the process of metabolizing calories into energy. If fat is not burned, it’s stored on the body. Previous research shows a similar effect in men.

It’s important to note that while stress can lead to overeating, that is not what this research showed. The women in the study were fed high-fat meals as part of the design of the study; they did not choose those foods on their own. Regardless, this adds to a large body of research suggesting the importance of reducing stress and adhering to a healthy diet.

 

TIME medicine

Study: Phones, Tablets May Irritate People With Nickel Allergies

Ken Miyauchi, vice president and chief operating officer of Softbank Corp., left, holds an Apple Inc. iPad Mini during a ceremony as the device goes on sale at the Softbank store in the Ginza district of Tokyo on November 30, 2012.
Ken Miyauchi, vice president and chief operating officer of Softbank Corp., left, holds an Apple Inc. iPad Mini during a ceremony as the device goes on sale at the Softbank store in the Ginza district of Tokyo on November 30, 2012. Bloomberg/Getty Images

One boy had skin rashes from his iPad

A nickel allergy is one of the most common types of skin allergies, causing many people to experience irritation from jewelry, for example. New research shows that nickel allergies are becoming more common among kids, with one case being triggered by exposure to an iPad tablet.

In a recent case study published in the journal Pediatrics, an 11-year-old boy with a history of skin rashes had a particularly persistent breakout that lasted over six months. The doctors ultimately determined the trigger was nickel in his family’s iPad. An iPad cover was added, the boy changed his diet, and the rashes improved.

Apple did not respond to requests for comment.

The report’s authors say dermatologists should be mindful that some electronic devices may cause irritation for people with nickel allergies. As the Associated Press reports, only about 25% of children tested for skin allergies are allergic to nickel. Individuals who have no problems when it comes to the metal — the majority of people — shouldn’t worry about the nickel in their gadgets.

 

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