TIME movies

Christian Bale ‘Jealous’ That Ben Affleck Gets to Play Batman Now

EE British Academy Film Awards 2014 - Red Carpet Arrivals
Christian Bale attends the EE British Academy Film Awards 2014 at The Royal Opera House on Feb. 16, 2014 in London, England Karwai Tang—WireImage/Getty Images

"I just stopped and stared into nothing for half an hour," Bale said

You’d think that after three movies with the comic-book character that Christian Bale would be ready to let go of playing Batman. Bale thought that too, but he recently admitted he was feeling “jealous” that Ben Affleck was cast as the caped crusader for the upcoming Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

“The fact that I’m jealous of someone else playing Batman … I think I should have gotten over it by now,” he told Empire magazine.

Bale says he hasn’t spoken with Affleck about the role, but he has emailed him with advice.

“I’ve got to admit initially, even though I felt that it was the right time to stop, there was always a bit of me going, ‘Oh go on… Let’s do another,'” Bale said elsewhere in the interview. “So when I heard there was someone else doing it, there was a moment where I just stopped and stared into nothing for half an hour.”

[Huffington Post]

TIME Music

Watch the ‘Hunger Games’ and One Direction Mash-Up You Didn’t Know You Needed

A "Mockingjay"-inspired twist on One Direction's "Steal My Girl"

People like The Hunger Games. People like One Direction. But will these two great tastes taste great together?

Find out for yourself by listening to “Kill My Girl,” a Mockingjay-inspired twist on One Direction’s “Steal My Girl.” It’s the third in a series of Hunger Gamessong parodies by Twenty First Records, which previously put a little Panem into Rihanna’s “We Found Love” and Miley Cyrus’s “Wrecking Ball.”

And it’s not even just parody, either. With sample lyrics like “I love Katniss / But Peeta’s with her / I snuck in a kiss / Our district did burn,” it’s also a handy recap for those of us who haven’t seen Mockingjay yet and need a refresher on how the last movie wrapped things up. Handy!

This article originally appeared on PEOPLE.com

TIME celebrities

Bono, Shia LaBeouf Lead GQ’s ‘Least Influential’ 2014 List

Bambi Awards 2014 - Show
Bono of U2 perform on stage during the Bambi Awards 2014 show on November 13, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. Gisela Schober—Getty Images

GQ releases 2014's list of “30 Least Influential People"

As the year comes to a close, it’s time for the inevitable look back on some of the most important people, events, and releases of the year. But what about those people, events, and releases that were a complete waste of our time?

In honor of that sentiment, GQ has released 2014′s list of “30 Least Influential People,” recognizing those “who took up vast clouds of oxygen, gave us back nothing of use, and probably helped accelerate the death of our planet.”

GQ‘s Drew Magary notes that the list is not a ranking of the 30 least influential, but rather a random assortment of those who didn’t do all that much to better the earth in the last 11 months. Among them are Bono and U2—or the “Tom Friedman of rock and the rest of his band”—who earned a spot for Songs of Innocence and its forced release into every iTunes user’s library.

Also on the list are President Barack Obama for his response to major catastrophes in the last year, Robin Thicke for cheating on his wife and then writing an entire album to try to win her back, CNN for spending the majority of the year searching for a single plane, and Shia LaBeouf for… well, for being Shia LaBeouf.

Check out GQ for the entire list and bask in the ineptitude that’s been on display throughout 2014.

This article originally appeared on Entertainment Weekly

TIME Theater

An Unseen Arthur Miller Play Will Debut in 2015

Miller wrote it as a movie, but the country's political climate kept it from happening

A previously unseen play from the late Pulitzer-winning playwright Arthur Miller will debut next year.

Miller, who passed away in 2005, wrote The Hook originally as a movie, but it never came to fruition after Hollywood executives pushed Miller to make communists the villains, the BBC reports. One of Miller’s best-known plays, The Crucible, allegorically criticizes the red scare during the years of Senator Joseph McCarthy’s House Un-American Activitees Committee, framed during the 17th century Salem witch trials.

The Hook is set in 1950s New York and follows a dockworker who encounters corruption.

“Miller was a man of extraordinary integrity,” director James Dacre said. “He was absolutely determined to depict the work as it was rather as other people demanded he describe it.”

It will premiere at the Royal & Derngate theater in Northampton, England, in June of 2015. Then, it will move to the Everyman Theater in Liverpool in July.

[BBC]

TIME celebrities

6 Things John Green and Taylor Swift Could Have Discussed on the Phone

What are the bestselling author and pop star talking about?

YA literature and pop superstardom collided Monday when John Green and pop (née country) sensation Taylor Swift synced up over the phone. Green took to Twitter, from the set of the film adaptation of his book Paper Towns, to let his 3 million followers know about the exchange.

It’s no secret that the two are fans of each other’s work. When Swift’s album 1989 was released, Green blogged about listening to it when he should have been paying attention in meetings. Swift responded that he was her favorite author. And so began the social media love fest. But what could the two be discussing? Here are some theories:

He’s asking her to contribute to the Paper Towns soundtrack. The film starring Nat Wolff and Cara Delevingne will hit theaters in June of 2015. Acts like British crooner Ed Sheeran and rising pop star Charli XCX contributed to The Fault in Our Stars soundtrack this year, but perhaps Green is hoping to bring some even bigger guns on board this time — like a certain TIME magazine cover star.

They could be interviewing each other. Magazines sometimes put celebrities together to see what happens. That’s basically the whole premise of Interview magazine. The New York Times also just sat down with authors Gillian Flynn and Cheryl Strayed to talk about their books’ film adaptations. Maybe Swift and Green hopped on a call to share their insights on teenagers? With his book sales and her record sales, they certainly know how to tap into America’s youth.

They’re discussing movie roles. Swift likes a challenge, so after dominating the music industry, maybe she’s setting her sights on Hollywood. Paramount has signed actress and filmmaker Sarah Polley to adapt Green’s Looking for Alaska, but no one has been cast as the blonde, beautiful and enigmatic Alaska yet. Or perhaps Green was so impressed with Swift’s brief appearance in The Giver that he’s asking her to make a different cameo in the film.

Taylor wants another friend. The star is famous for making new besties and entertaining them in style. Tavi Gevinson, Emma Stone, Lena Dunham, Selena Gomez, Karlie Koss and even Kendrick Lamar are in Swift’s social circle. So given their mutual admiration, why not add Green to the list? Maybe she invited him over to make pie.

They’re talking about Serial. The Serial podcast is the most popular podcast in the history of podcasts, so why couldn’t the author and the pop singer be among its 1.5 million fans? Maybe Swift can’t stop thinking about the call from Nisha. Maybe, like reporter Sarah Koenig, Green is dwelling on the selective use of phone call records in the murder case. Most important of all, what’s a Best Buy? What makes its Buy the Best?

He’s trying to get her back on Spotify. Perhaps Green has discovered that, since 1989 came out he can’t get work done listening to anything else. Green can likely afford Swift’s music, but maybe he’s concerned about the next generation of novelists who are unable to experience the joys of crafting great fiction while “Wildest Dreams” plays softly in the background. “But Taylor, Beyoncé just put her last album on Spotify, why can’t you do the same? Think of the children!” Green pleads. “Oh John,” Swift laughs. “Would you like it if people could read your books for free?”

Read next: Taylor Swift Defends Albums as ‘Art’ at the American Music Awards

TIME Television

True Detective Confirms 3 More Cast Members

HBO's "True Detective" Season 1 / Director: Cary Fukunaga
'True Detective' JIm Bridges—HBO

Including Rachel McAdams

HBO is announcing some more cast members for True Detective season two.

The network has finally officially confirmed that Rachel McAdams (Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows) and Kelly Reilly (Black Box) have joined as female leads, along with Taylor Kitsch (Lone Survivor) in a major role.

Here are the official descriptions:

Rachel McAdams as Ani Bezzerides, a Ventura County Sheriff’s detective whose uncompromising ethics put her at odds with others and the system she serves.

Taylor Kitsch as Paul Woodrugh, a war veteran and motorcycle officer for the California Highway Patrol, running from a difficult past and the sudden glare of a scandal that never happened.

Kelly Reilly as Jordan, Frank Semyon’s wife, a former D-list actress who is a full partner in his enterprises and ambitions.

Previously confirmed cast:

Colin Farrell as Ray Velcoro, a compromised detective whose allegiances are torn between his masters in a corrupt police department and the mobster who owns him.

Vince Vaughn as Frank Semyon, a criminal and entrepreneur in danger of losing his empire when his move into legitimate enterprise is upended by the murder of a business partner.

This article originally appeared on Entertainment Weekly

TIME celebrities

Everything You Need to Know About the Bill Cosby Scandal

Bill Cosby during an interview about the upcoming exhibit, Conversations: African and African-American Artworks in Dialogue, at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington. ON NOV. 6, 2014.
Bill Cosby during an interview about the upcoming exhibit, "Conversations: African and African-American Artworks in Dialogue," at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 6, 2014 Evan Vucci—AP

A cheat sheet to all the sexual abuse allegations

It’s hard to keep track of the sexual abuse allegations swirling around Bill Cosby, with fresh ones popping up seemingly every day and an unusual mix of decades-old accusations and brand new claims all getting a very public hearing in the news media.

All in all, 16 women have publicly accused Cosby of sexual abuse, 12 of whom have accused him of drugging them to facilitate the abuse. Some of those women may be among 13 anonymous “Jane Doe” accusers who agreed to testify against Cosby in a 2005 lawsuit that was settled out of court. Taken together, the accusations span the length of Cosby’s long career in the public eye as a beloved actor and comedian, from the mid-1960s to the mid-2000’s. They were given new light last month by a comedian’s standup routine that caught fire on social media, and new accusers coming forward has led to a drip-drip effect of even more coming forward.

Cosby and his legal team have at various times issued wide-ranging, categorical denials or refused to discuss individual cases, with Cosby saying last week that “a guy doesn’t have to answer to innuendos.”

MORE: A timeline of the Bill Cosby sexual assault allegations

So how is anybody supposed to make heads or tails of all this? Here’s a reader’s guide to understanding the story.

Why are we hearing about all this now?

Much of the current outrage can be traced to a standup bit in October by comedian Hannibal Buress, in which he mocked Cosby’s “respectability” schtick by saying, “well, yea, you’re a rapist.” The clip quickly went viral, and led one of Cosby’s longterm accusers, artist Barbara Bowman, to give an interview to the Daily Mail about her alleged abuse.

An apparent public relations effort by Cosby’s team to come out in front of the brewing scandal backfired badly when a request for “Cosby memes” became an avalanche of rape jokes on social media. Shortly after that, Bowman published an op-ed piece in the Washington Post entitled, “Bill Cosby Raped Me. Why Did It Take 30 Years for People to Believe My Story?”

“Only after a man, Hannibal Buress, called Bill Cosby a rapist in a comedy act last month did the public outcry begin in earnest,” Bowman wrote. “While I am grateful for the new attention to Cosby’s crimes, I must ask my own questions: Why wasn’t I believed? Why didn’t I get the same reaction of shock and revulsion when I originally reported it? Why was I, a victim of sexual assault, further wronged by victim blaming when I came forward? The women victimized by Bill Cosby have been talking about his crimes for more than a decade. Why didn’t our stories go viral?”

From there, the story spun out of Cosby’s control.

What has Cosby said about all this?

Cosby and his legal team have either issued blanket denials or refused to discuss the issue at all.

“The new, never-before-heard claims from women who have come forward in the past two weeks with unsubstantiated, fantastical stories about things they say occurred 30, 40, or even 50 years ago have escalated far past the point of absurdity,” Cosby lawyer Martin Singer said in a statement last week. “These brand new claims about alleged decades-old events are becoming increasingly ridiculous, and it is completely illogical that so many people would have said nothing, done nothing, and made no reports to law enforcement or asserted civil claims if they thought they had been assaulted over a span of so many years.

Cosby, for his part, told a Florida newspaper that “a guy doesn’t have to answer to innuendos.” And he wouldn’t even discuss the matter in a later-released excerpt of an interview with the Associated Press.

So if so many of the accusations are old, what’s this really about?

In many ways the story has evolved beyond what Cosby did or didn’t do, morphing into an all-out debate about why some accusers are only now coming forward, why others weren’t taken seriously before, how Cosby might have been able to keep doing this for so long, and what it might mean for his legacy.

Are the accusers’ stories consistent?

Yes. The alleged victims tend to be young, starstruck women, many report being drugged, and almost all say they didn’t come forward for fear that they would not be believed.

Where can I go if I want to learn more?

Here’s an excellent timeline of everything we know (and don’t know) so far about the allegations against Cosby. You can also check out Slate‘s complete list of all his accusers, and this in-depth Washington Post investigation that includes video testimony from some of the alleged victims. The New York Daily News reports on a former NBC employee who now says he delivered money to women for Cosby and stood outside his dressing room while Cosby was with them. (One of the women said Monday that the money was just “generosity.) And a 2006 story in Philadelphia magazine was one of the earliest and most in-depth looks at the history of allegations against Cosby.

So what happens next?

Many hard questions are being asked about Cosby’s legacy in entertainment and his place in African-American history. John McWhorter wrote for TIME that the rise of black public figures like Herman Cain and Barack Obama has allowed American society to “judge black icons like everybody else,” without fear that criticism will descend into racial stereotyping.

TIME TV critic James Poniewozik questions whether audiences can separate Cosby from his iconic Cliff Huxtable character. Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote in The Atlantic that one of his only regrets in his writing career is failing to address the rape allegations against Cosby when he wrote a big piece about him for a national magazine, calling his attitude “reckless.” And Lindy West, writing for GQ, says, simply, that “Bill Cosby is done. It’s over. … Cosby needs to throw in the towel and go live out the rest of his life in cushy ignominy.”

— Additional reporting by David Stout

Read next: So What Do We Do About The Cosby Show?

TIME Video Games

The 10 Craziest Things I’ve Done in Far Cry 4 So Far

Ubisoft

Ubisoft's Nepal-inspired Himalayan sandbox doubles as an adrenaline-junkie thriller

Far Cry 4 throws a spanner into the narrative that Ubisoft lost its mojo this year, by which I mean the Assassin’s Creed Unity debacle, though “debacle” probably overstates the issue.

A quick word about Unity: It’s not a bad game, it’s just not the series-upending shift we were led to expect. Plus, it shipped with bugs, a glitchy navigation system and a tendency to stutter in game-impacting ways when fighting amongst the game’s ballyhooed masses. No wonder Ubisoft delayed the game’s release from October. In hindsight, they should have pushed it off to December, or even early 2015.

Not so Far Cry 4, which shipped relatively trouble-free and flush with incremental improvements in accord with the studio’s modest prerelease claims. If you come to Ajay Ghale’s Himalayan romp expecting narrative profundity, or a more subversive take on the Westerner-in-exotic-climes trope, you should probably look elsewhere. But if you just want Far Cry 3‘s elaborate playscape with a better sense of activity equilibrium and all the play systems not so much further sanded as subtly sandpapery (offering gratifying pushbacks, particularly in combat scenarios), this is it.

It’s also the most Point Break of the games in the series, bristling with utterly preposterous high octane thrills. Here’s a list of the ones I’ve managed to pull off so far:

Hijack a vehicle…from another vehicle

You can execute this bit of vehicular derring-do one of two ways: driving alongside another vehicle, looking toward the driver and clicking the takedown button, or doing the same from your lofty perch in the “Buzzer,” the game’s able gyrocopter.

There’s even an achievement for the vehicle-to-vehicle version of this stunt, but you’ll need to pull it off riding shotgun, meaning you’ll want to recruit a skilled co-op pal and driver to help you do the deed.

Take an outpost by lobbing grenades from the gyrocopter

It’s a measure of how important verticality is to Far Cry 4 that each time the game deposits you in some new story-space, it gives the elevation alongside the place name–and the gyrocopter’s your ticket to exploiting it.

Why wouldn’t you take Far Cry 4‘s versatile sky-ride with you everywhere, circumventing combat snarls and geographic chokepoints?

It’s a workable theory if you’re trawling for loot chests, masks and all the game’s other collectible miscellany (below its stall point, anyway). But in practice, Ubisoft has built in offsets that complicate aerial ubiquity, namely this one: the gyrocopter moves like a floating boulder, meaning you’re easy prey for snipers as well as the game’s insanely distance-accurate combat regulars.

But if you’re intrepid and handy with the game’s M-79 grenade launcher, you can knock out the game’s smaller outposts quickly, helped along by the miracle of kickback-free physics.

Square off with a herd of honey badgers

The toughest animals in Far Cry 4 by a Kyrati mile if you’re hunting by way of bow and arrow aren’t its deathly-fleet tigers or you-flattening bears, they’re a little creature the world barely knew before this video went viral. Good luck taking just one out with a bit of recurved carbon fiber and fletching, much less a pack if you happen to invoke the unfortunate wrath of a squadron.

Irony, thy name is mellivora capensis.

Take a radio tower by wingsuit

This one’s tricker than it sounds: you’ll need (a) a sense of optimal height and distance, and (b) timing to deploy your parachute, and (c) further spot-on aiming to steer your parachuting body onto the sloped rim of the tower’s topmost areas, and (d) to do all of that with a tower that’s situated low enough so you don’t stall out the gyrocopter climbing to a high enough altitude to make a, b and c possible.

No, you can’t simply land the gyrocopter on the tower top and step out. I’ve tried at least a dozen times, and maybe I’m just inept, but the game always ejects me (and the gyrocopter) several meters off the side of the tower.

Note: Be careful you don’t steer into the zip-line as you’re parachuting in, or you’ll hook that by accident and find yourself angling all the way back to the ground in a blink.

Take a fortress while riding an elephant

You’ll need the “elephant rider” skill to saddle a pachyderm, but once you have it, you’re all but invincible in small scrums where you can overpower enemies by charging and bashing them. (vehicles, too.) There’s even a related elephant-riding achievement, and you can hasten progress toward it by directing your four-legged be-trunked tank at one of the game’s guard-choked fortresses.

Yes, the guns-a-blazin’ route invites the guards to sound the alarm and call in reinforcements, but so long as you’re adept at knocking helicopters from the sky with the grenade launcher, those extras become opportunity targets.

Pro tip: It’s best to stealth-eliminate any snipers on the ramparts first, else you’ll find yourself ended moments after alerting the guards to your presence.

Get chased all the way up a radio tower by a killer tiger

I kid not, this happened to me. After lobbing bait near the base of a tower and rushing past a lured tiger–then attacking my enemies–to scale the first ladder, I discovered tigers in Far Cry 4 are as deft at jumping impossible distances as the domestic cats I’ve owned when it comes to clambering up kitchen larders.

In other words: heights in Far Cry 4 offer fleeting respite from giant man-eating cats.

Climb Eklo Beindu Summit and watch the sunrise

Eklo Beindu Summit would be the mass of vertiginous cliffs and precipitous overhangs situated in Far Cry 4‘s south-central area, and they represent the most impressive instances of combat-free, grapple-based sightseeing I’ve encountered so far. If you want to get lost in the game’s climbing puzzles for upwards of hours, angling ever-higher as you scan for grapple points and optimal swing arcs over chasms, Eklo Beindu offers several worthy collectibles, and better still, some of the game’s finest views.

Kill an enemy from 60 or more meters away with an arrow or bolt

Another achievement-related feat, this one’s best performed by an outpost that’s situated near foothills or a cliff, so you can take advantage of height to get close enough to spy your target while maintaining sufficient distance.

The game doesn’t model wind, so you’ll always fire straight, you’ll just need to take into account gravity and aim slightly over your target instead of dead on.

Fly thousands of meters in the wingsuit

Fly 5,000, in fact, and there’s an achievement in the bargain. The quickest way to do this: take the gyrocopter as high as it’ll go near Khilana Bazaar (the first outpost you’ll liberate in Kyrat’s southwestern area), leap out, fly as far as you can, then pull up the map, quick-travel back to the outpost’s safe house (re-parking a gyrocopter that sits just up the road), and repeat.

Catch sight of a giant bird carrying a pig into the sky

Not a piglet, I’m talking about a full-grown fattened swine here. Birds in Far Cry 4 are second only to the honey badger when ranking wildlife by unexpected creepiness. Think the gooney birds in J.B. Stamper’s Tales for the Midnight Hour.

TIME Television

Game of Thrones Should Have More Male Nudity, Natalie Dormer Says

“I think 'Thrones' has been better than your average show with the equality, but they could definitely ramp it up!'

English actress Natalie Dormer is best known for playing beguiling femme fatales as astute as they are alluring—currently as Margaery Tyrell on Game of Thrones, formerly as Irene Adler on Elementary and Anne Boleyn on The Tudors, as well as “The Blonde” who seduces Brad Pitt in The Counselor. “I love those women that I play that have sexual power,” Dormer told The Daily Beast in an interview published today. “But I’m trying to step away from it for me, and for my artistic growth. It’s also more who I am. I’m not that woman.”

And step away from it she did: For her latest role as The Hunger Games: Mockingjay–Part 1, out in theaters Friday, Dormer shifted gears to play Cressida, a filmmaker creating anti-Capitol, pro-Katniss propaganda for the rebel faction—a character baring more resemblance to Skrillex than a sexpot. She chatted with The Daily Beast about playing Cressida, as well as the status of feminism in Hollywood, and, most crucially, the troubling inequity between male and female nudity on Game of Thrones.

“During the first season Alfie [Allen, who plays Theon Greyjoy] Richard [Madden, who plays Robb Stark], and several of the men got naked—although not all the way,” Dormer recalled when asked about the nudity ratios on the HBO series. “I suppose it’s just the rules of broadcast television, isn’t it? I think Thrones has been better than your average show with the equality, but they could definitely ramp it up! Absolutely.”

She also voiced her appreciation for the refreshingly un-patriarchal universe of The Hunger Games and Interstellar. “What I love about Mockingjay–Part 1 is that President Coin or Cressida could have easily been played by a man,” Dormer said, “and if you look at Interstellar, the Anne Hathaway or Jessica Chastain roles would have been men years ago. I’m glad that cinema is catching up to what television has known for a while: that three-dimensional, complex women get an audience engaged as much as the men.”

This article originally appeared on Entertainment Weekly

TIME Music

Idris Elba Wants to Release an Album Inspired by Luther

"I'd like to dissect the idea of someone who has to deal with so much darkness"

Idris Elba loves playing the titular role on the BBC crime show Luther so much that he’s planning to record an album about it.

The actor said he’s working on songs inspired by police detective John Luther and the demons he battles, RadioTimes reports. The album’s working title is Murder Loves John.

“I’d like to dissect the idea of someone who has to deal with so much darkness,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Front Row. “That could create some really good songs … and definitely an interesting mood, musically.”

It’s not the first time Elba has released music. He just released Idris Elba Presents mi Mandela, a collection of songs inspired by his role as Nelson Mandela in 2013’s Long Walk to Freedom.

[RadioTimes]

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