TIME Television

See What the Saved By the Bell Actors Have Been Up To

Bayside High has some pretty talented alumni

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Before the Unauthorized Saved by the Bell Story premiers on Lifetime and ruins your memories of Bayside High School, let’s take some time to remember the cast.

The six biggest co-stars became household names at a young age in the late 80s and early 90s, but that isn’t always a recipe for later success. From staring in crime dramas to hosting The X-Factor, the Saved by the Bell kids managed to get pretty good jobs out of school . . . except Screech.

Here’s what the Saved by the Bell crew has been up to since they left Bayside.

 

TIME Television

Review: The Roosevelts: An Intimate History

President Theodore Roosevelt with his family, 1903Photo credit: Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace NHS
President Theodore Roosevelt with his family, 1903 Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace NHS/PBS

The PBS saga premieres Sept. 14 and airs every night for seven days

Documentarian Ken Burns issues another sprawling American ­story — 14 hours over seven episodes — this time exploring the legacies of the Roosevelts. Past histories of the family have almost always focused on Presidents (and distant cousins) Theodore and Franklin Delano, treating Eleanor (who was Teddy’s niece) and her activism as a sidelight. But Burns elevates the First Lady’s skillful promotion of social reform, putting it on equal footing as he takes on more than a century of politics and global change, from Teddy’s birth in 1858 to Eleanor’s death in 1962.

TIME celebrity

Bruce Springsteen Is Writing a Children’s Book

US singer Bruce Springsteen and The E St
US singer Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band perform, on May 17, 2012 at Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona. LLUIS GENE—AFP/Getty Images

It's about a bank-robbing baby, based on his song 'Outlaw Pete'

Well, friends, it looks like the Boss is officially getting into the publishing game. He’s working on a book called Outlaw Pete, inspired by his 2009 song of the same name, the New York Times reports.

Simon & Schuster, which is publishing the book, is touting it as a “a picture book for adults” that can also be read to children. (We’re pretty sure this actually means it’s a children’s book that can also be enjoyed by adults, but okay.)

“It’s a book for anybody who loves a good Western,” Simon & Schuster president Jonathan Karp told the Times Thursday.

“Outlaw Pete,” from Springsteen’s 2009 album Working on a Dream, is an eight-minute track outlining the story of a bank-robbing baby. The book will pair Springsteen’s words with the illustrations of cartoonist Frank Caruso. It hits shelves November 4. Our hearts are already hungry for it.

TIME Books

See an Exclusive ‘Self-Portrait’ From the Creator of XKCD

XKCD Creator Randall Munroe
Munroe has fun with the formulas for angular momentum of a spinning object (top) and centripetal force (bottom). Randall Munroe for TIME

The webcomic's science series, What If?, is now a book

For the past two years, xkcd creator Randall Munroe has been answering fantastical science questions for his popular webcomic’s sister site, What If?. In the new issue of TIME, Munroe talks about turning the project into a book (What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions, hitting shelves Sept. 2) and how he conducts his investigations into topics like jetpacks and dinosaur nutrition.

“I try to be entertaining in the way I share them, but my real motivation with each question is that I want to know the answer,” Munroe says. “Once a question gets into my head, it will keep bugging me until I figure out the answer, whether I’m writing an article about it or not.”

Though Munroe says he uses stick-figures for xkcd and What If? because he’s “not very good at drawing,” we asked him to draw a self-portrait anyway — at least, as much of a self-portrait as you can get using only stick-figures. In the exclusive illustration above, also on newsstands now, Munroe has fun with the formulas for angular momentum of a spinning object (top) and centripetal force (bottom).

TIME Theater

Broadway Fall Preview: Revivals, Stars and Sting

Tavi Gevinson This Is Our Youth Michael Cera Broadway Cast NYC
Culkin, Gevinson and Cera will try to hold the stage Peter Hapak for TIME

High-wattage actors populate the high-profile shows opening this fall on Broadway

Big stars from movies and TV are hardly a novelty on Broadway anymore. But this fall may be some kind of high-water mark. Famous names will be plastered all over Broadway marquees — mostly in revivals, or in tony ensemble pieces rather than classic star turns. It’s only prudent. Few Hollywood stars want to risk facing the critics in an untried new play (as Katie Holmes did two seasons ago in the ill-fated Dead Accounts), or take on a demanding classic role where they’re likely to be judged against a long line of legendary predecessors (witness the tepid reviews for Scarlett Johansson’s recent turn as Maggie in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof).

This Is Our Youth, Kenneth Lonergan’s critically praised off-Broadway comedy from the 1990s, seems like an ideal vehicle for the trio of stars headlining its Broadway debut (opening on Sept. 11). Michael Cera, known for his sweetly disaffected teens in movies like Superbad and Juno, plays a Manhattan rich kid who steals $15,000 from his father; Kieran Culkin (Igby Goes Down) is his manic, drug-dealing friend; and Tavi Gevenson (the 18-year-old fashion blogger who has just launched an acting career) rounds out the intriguing cast as Cera’s girlfriend.

Two more young stars making Broadway debuts, Ewan McGregor and Maggie Gyllenhaal, are the chief raison d’etre for a revival of The Real Thing, Tom Stoppard’s 1982 marital drama returning to Broadway for the third time (Oct. 30). Glenn Close (who co-starred in the original Broadway production of The Real Thing) and John Lithgow head the cast of A Delicate Balance, Edward Albee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1967 drama (Nov. 20), last seen on Broadway in 1996. Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane, stage pals from The Producers and The Odd Couple, will reunite — along with F. Murray Abraham, Stockard Channing, Megan Mullally and Harry Potter’s Rupert Grint — in the Broadway debut of Terrence McNally’s backstage theater comedy It’s Only a Play (Oct. 9). Bradley Cooper takes on the title role in a revival of Bernard Pomerance’s hit drama The Elephant Man. And James Earl Jones gets top billing in a new version of the Kaufman-Hart warhorse You Can’t Take It With You (Sept. 28).

Also returning to Broadway this fall is perhaps the ultimate star vehicle of them all: A. R. Gurney’s Love Letters, a showcase for two actors reading a series of letters that chronicle the ups and downs of a 50-year love affair. Mia Farrow and Brian Dennehy will play the roles for the first month, followed by tag-team series of duos, including such age-appropriate stars as Carol Burnett, Candice Bergen, Alan Alda, Angelica Huston and Martin Sheen.

The only star of the sole new musical set to open this fall is the man behind the scenes: Sting. For his first Broadway musical, The Last Ship, (Oct. 26), the rock star has drawn on his own childhood experiences, setting the musical in an English seafaring town where the last shipyard is about to close down. After somewhat mixed reviews for a pre-Broadway run in Chicago (and a spotty record for rock stars trying to transition to Broadway), its prospects are uncertain. But for musical fans, it’s the only game in town this fall, aside from a couple of well-hyped revivals: On the Town, the Bernstein-Comden-Green perennial (Oct. 16), and Side Show, the 1996 musical about the Hilton sisters, Siamese twins who became a hit in vaudeville in the 1920s, which is returning a new production reconceived by director Bill Condon (Nov. 17).

Amid all the stars and revivals, is there any room left on Broadway for serious new plays? Yes, actually — three promising ones this fall.

The most anticipated is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Simon Stephens’ adaptation of the novel by Mark Haddon about a 15-year-old autistic genius who investigates the killing of a neighbor’s dog. The London production won critical raves and a record-tying seven Olivier awards, including one for Best Play and another for director Marianne Elliott, who is bringing her British production over here largely intact.

Another new British import is The River, the latest work from Jez Butterworth (Jerusalem), set in a remote cabin where a fisherman has an enigmatic encounter with two women. Originally staged at the Royal Court Theatre, the Broadway version will have the same director (Ian Rickson), plus an extra dose of star power: Hugh Jackman, one of Broadway’s most reliable boxoffice draws, plays the fisherman.

The lone new American play of the fall season is Disgraced, Ayad Akthar’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about a Muslim-American lawyer facing a clash between his religion and his work relationships. After successful productions off Broadway and in regional theaters, its arrival is proof that Broadway can still make room for serious works by homegrown playwrights about contemporary issues. Even without stars.

TIME Television

The Liberation of Lizzy Caplan

Michael Sheen as Dr. William Masters and Lizzy Caplan as Virginia Johnson in Masters of Sex
Michael Sheen as Dr. William Masters and Lizzy Caplan as Virginia Johnson in Masters of Sex Frank W Ockenfels—Showtime

How after dozens of false starts, the star of Masters of Sex finally got on top

A bone scraper and a sausage piper surround Lizzy Caplan, and yet she is nowhere near the set of her show, Masters of Sex. She is wearing jeans and open-toe sandals. This may have been a mistake, since she is walking into a refrigerator filled with dead pigs on hooks. It’s a tight fit into the meat locker of Lindy & Grundys, a posh Los Angeles butcher shop, and one of her human shoulders brushes against a pork shoulder. Caplan lets out a small yelp.

“This is horrifying,” she says with a grin. “I don’t eat a lot of pig because the outside is the same color as the meat. You need that disconnect you get with beef.”

Caplan is here for a sausage-making class, and, a little later, she is introduced to the Dickeron, a swordlike knife-sharpening contraption. Her hair, in a Fifties bob for her Emmy-nominated role of sexologist Virginia Johnson, starts, well, bobbing up and down.

“Pretty soon, I’m going to be making my own sausage,” says Caplan. She pauses, popping the giant greenish-gray eyes that have dominated multiple TV shows and movies that no one watched. “Once I get my own dick machine.”

Caplan picked the sausage-making class for our meeting, and I joke that I felt a tad uncomfortable writing about a female kneading pork. “I’m making it difficult for you because you’re going to have to figure out clever ways not to make innuendos about sausages,” says Caplan. But wouldn’t jokes be OK because she chose the place? Caplan gives me a withering stare. “I guess you could, but I’m expecting more from you.”

It was hard to tell if she was kidding or not. This is a vibe Caplan gives off to the uninitiated. “Part of her shtick is to come across as cold and standoffish at first, but it’s not at all what she’s like,” says Seth Rogen, who has known her since they were teenagers on Freaks and Geeks and who recently directed Caplan in the upcoming spy caper The Interview. “Lizzy’s very sweet once you get to know her. She has always played the smart, funny girl who cuts through the bullshit. That’s much harder than what I do, playing dumb.”

MORE: ‘Masters of Sex’ Q&A with Star Michael Sheen

In a way, the sausage-making conundrum is an apt metaphor for Caplan’s career. (No, really.) At 32, Caplan is best known for playing the anti-manic pixie dream girl (see Zooey Deschanel and Kirsten Dunst) in a bushel of little-seen but hilarious enterprises – get ye online and watch the caterers on Vicodin in Party Down or 2012’s girls-gone-wilding Bachelorette – where she’s the snarky girl with a heart made of some metallic concoction that is not gold. It was a great life, but Caplan felt hemmed in as “that girl” and wondered if that was all Hollywood had for her.

And that’s where sex came in. Caplan is winding up the second season of Showtime’s Masters of Sex, where she plays the research partner/lab partner/sex partner of Dr. William Masters as they delve into the study of sexual behavior during the 1950s. Eventually, their studies would land them fame, but the first years were harrowing, particularly for Johnson. There’s more than a little of Caplan in Johnson, not so much the sex part as wanting to be taken seriously in an industry more than happy to overlook her. The doubts of casting directors became her own doubts.

They remained even after she got the part. Caplan, co-star Michael Sheen and show creator Michelle Ashford met in L.A. with Showtime execs after the pilot was picked up in 2012. Sheen, a classically trained Welsh actor who has seemingly been playing Tony Blair his entire career, regaled the room with tales of portraying Jesus in a 72-hour re-enactment of the Passion play. Caplan listened closely and felt a roomful of eyes turn to her.

“Well, I once starred in a movie with Dane Cook,” she said.

Everyone in the room laughed. But when Caplan got back to her car, she thought, “I’m sitting across from Jesus, and everybody’s eating out of the palm of his hand.”

Then she started to cry.

At the shop, Caplan fires questions at Amelia the butcher, not unlike the way some of her characters might – “Have you ever gotten a pig and then cut it open and a baby fell out?” – and the conversation quickly takes a turn to the sexual proclivities of the American male as it relates to meat. Amelia recounts how strangers online send her messages about what they would like to do to her among the pork.

“Weird,” shouts Caplan above the sounds of pig-grinding. Ice is added to ease the transition from pig meat to sausage. “This was in the news recently, because somebody just got arrested for it. It’s like animal porn, but then they kill the animal. Like, pop a chicken’s head off while you’re jerking and shit.”

Amelia is horrified. “Oh, no. I am so turned off by this,” she says.

Caplan looks thoughtful for a second. “But doesn’t it sort of warm your heart that there’s something for everybody?”

Amelia doesn’t know what to say, so she just cleans up the pork snow-cone ice left over from our sausage-making. A little while later, Caplan exits the butcher shop with a bag of sausages that she’ll prepare for her dad tomorrow on Father’s Day. She takes a seat in a booth at a nearby restaurant, and while it’s not quite a wall, a reticence drops over her, making it clear she’s much more comfortable talking about choking chickens than her personal life.

MORE: In Pics: America’s Hottest Sex Symbols

She was raised not far from here, in the Miracle Mile in Los Angeles. Caplan is the youngest of three kids whose father is a lawyer. She had the childhood of a typical Jewish L.A. kid, a bat mitzvah, a domineering piano teacher, a trip to Israel, and a liberal home where questions about sex could be asked. But then her mom fell ill and died when Caplan was 13. Through the grieving, Caplan first started thinking of becoming an actress.

“Strangely, from that age on I thought the only reason why I could even attempt to be an actress was because this horrible thing happened to me,” she says in a quiet voice. “Like something dark and terrible had to happen in order to earn your stripes as a human being and be able to be an actress. I don’t know where I got that from.”

Caplan went to an L.A. arts high school, and then started going on auditions. Her first role was on Freaks and Geeks, co-starring Rogen, who recalls her as “funny, Jewish and smart, pretty much the whole package for me.” She was supposed to appear in one episode, but her charm won over showrunners Paul Feig and Judd Apatow. “There was something unique about her performance,” Apatow recalls. “So we brought her back again. Then, when it was time to shoot the finale, we were so impressed by her work that we thought, ‘What if Jason Segel’s character started dating Lizzie?’ She was amazing as his rebound romance.”

The Freaks and Geeks experience set the tone for much of Caplan’s career as she ambled into her twenties: winning quiet acclaim playing the role of “who’s that girl?” in shows and movies that disappeared. Caplan estimates she shot at least seven pilots. There were moments of brilliance, but lots of no’s – her role in Mean Girls was followed by a year without work. She scored a part inTrue Blood in 2008, but that came with its own trauma. On her second day, she was required to do the first nude scene of her career.

“I remember all the many hours of pep talks required of my friends, like, ‘Tell me that my body doesn’t look weird,'” says Caplan. “I walked into my dressing room, and where your clothes are hanging on a rack was just one pair of underwear.”

Caplan did what most people would do in that situation: She swigged some vodka, got drunk and started asking crew members how they liked her ass. Caplan recounts the story with some reluctance, perhaps regretting that and some of the other stories she let out of the bag about when she was young and brash – including a tale about passing out on her birthday naked and splayed on her bed, compelling her gay roommate to move out – and it’s clear she wants to be seen in a more serious light now that she’s on Masters of Sex.

“Aiming for the stars becomes a bit soul-crushing after you’re told ‘no’ for the thousandth time,” she says. “I didn’t want to be continually rejected. I was right at the doorway of believing I couldn’t do anything else when this came around. It was right in the nick of time.”

Since Masters of Sex started, Caplan hasn’t let her character wander away. She persuaded Thomas Maier, author of the book version of Masters of Sex, to let her listen to some of his interview tapes with Virginia Johnson. She became fascinated with the contradictions of Johnson, who insisted she never loved William Masters even though they ended up married for two decades. “There hasn’t been one day that has gone by in those three years that I have not been thinking about this job,” says Caplan. “I don’t remember a time before Virginia Johnson.”

Caplan harbored fantasies of spending the night with Johnson at her assisted-living center in St. Louis, but it didn’t happen. Johnson died last year and was ambivalent about the show. But Caplan, who dated Matthew Perry for years and describes herself as “recently seriously single,” sees something of herself in Johnson.

MORE: ‘Mean Girls’ 10 Years Later: Where Are They Now?

“She wanted to be a mother, but she didn’t want to be a wife necessarily,” says Caplan. “I still have this idealized version where maybe I’ll get to be both simultaneously. That’s the goal right now. But she tailor-made her own life, picking and choosing from each category what she wanted. That was difficult for a woman in the 1950s. That’s how I want to live my life. It’s an act of bravery for women now who choose not to get married, who can have babies on their own and pursue their careers first.”

But it’s not just the feminist part of Johnson that connects with Caplan. Johnson was often derided in the book and on the show for getting by on sass and not substance. It’s not too far from the way Caplan was viewed in Hollywood before Masters of Sex. “I think Lizzy looked at Virginia and said, ‘There are so many things I can identify with,'” says show creator Ashford. “She’s lived much of this herself.”

The great irony is that the sex scenes in Masters of Sex are the easy part of the show for Caplan. After the vodka on the True Blood set, she’s reached a comfort level with her naked self. Before a recent taping of a scene where Caplan and Sheen copulate, Caplan reclined, put her legs up and yelled, “Ah, home again.”

The psychological strain of Virginia Johnson has been more difficult. Caplan seems exhausted by the experience in a way one is not exhausted by playing the love interest in Hot Tub Time Machine. A few weeks ago, she found herself sitting in her dressing room saying to herself, “I don’t wanna do this, I don’t wanna do this, I’d rather be doing anything but this.”

“It was a momentary ‘what the fuck, why am I here?’ kind of an existential crisis,” she says. “But it passed real quick. This is only my second Season Two. I’m so lucky.” Caplan flashes a quick smile. She then gathers up her bag of meat and heads for her BMW. There will be no crying tonight.

MORE: In Pics: 8 TV Shows You Should Be Watching Right Now

TIME Music

America’s Most Buzzed-About Music Festival Is…

Kanye West at South by Southwest 2014
Kanye West performs onstage at South by Southwest on March 12 in Austin, Texas. Rick Kern—Getty Images for Samsung

A new study says that one festival is more discussed than Coachella, Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo or Governor's Ball

A study sponsored by Eventbrite and Mashwork has determined that South by Southwest — held each March in Austin, TX — is America’s most buzzed-about music festival, beating out perennial favorites like Coachella in Indio, Calif., Lollapalooza in Chicago and Governors Ball in New York City. Ranking just behind SXSW in the top five were Las Vegas’ iHeartRadio, Chattahoochee Hills, GA’s TomorrowWorld, Lollapalooza and Coachella.

Despite South by Southwest’s strong showing, Texas didn’t rank amongst the top three states in terms of most chatter — that distinction went to New York, Nevada and California. The study also confirmed what may have already been obvious: music festivals are heavily youth-dominated, with 75% of the conversation generated by those between the ages of 17 and 34.

Eventbrite

A few other interesting tidbits from the report:

  • 54% of the conversation takes place before the event itself, easily besting the 17% that occurs during the festival and the 29% after it.
  • For Bonnaroo in Manchester, Tenn. and Hangout in Gulf Shores, Ala., it was all about the music — at both festivals, excitement about the full lineup or particular artist accounted for 65% and 63%, respectively, compared with a 47% average for the top 25 festivals overall.
  • People at Coachella spent way more time talking about style than at the average event — fashion discussion made up for 27% of the conversation there, compared with just 10% nationwide.
  • Though the ages of music festival fans closely mirrored the average age of Twitter users, a much wider spread is apparent from music fans’ taste in brands, where Starbucks, McDonalds and, of all places, Walmart proved favorites. Whole Foods, Best Buy and IHOP also scored highly.

Check out the full report here.

TIME Music

Beyoncé’s Dad Claims Infamous Elevator Fight Was a PR Stunt

"Charles James: Beyond Fashion" Costume Institute Gala - Candids
Beyonce and Jay-Z attend the "Charles James: Beyond Fashion" Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 5, 2014 in New York City. Neilson Barnard--Getty Images

After elevator footage leaked showing Jay-Z and Solange fighting while Beyonce stood by, it was all anyone could talk about. Now Mathew Knowles is saying that was the whole point

The celebrity scandal of the year might not have been much of a scandal at all.

Beyoncé and Solange Knowles’ father, Mathew Knowles, told a Houston radio talk show earlier this week that Elevator-Gate may have all been an elaborate show.

After video footage of Solange attacking her brother-in-law Jay Z in a elevator at the Standard Hotel was leaked earlier this year, everyone feared the worst. The clip, which was reportedly filmed after Solange, Jay and Beyoncé had left the Met Gala after-party, stoked speculation that Jay had cheated on Bey and that their marriage was on the rocks. The rumors are still circulating, months later, even amidst the couple’s joint On The Run tour that began in late June.

But that could have been the point, according to Bey’s dad and former manager. “[They needed something to] ignite that tour,” Knowles said. “It’s called a ‘Jedi mind trick.’ The Jedi mind trick fools you a lot of the time.”

Why would his daughters and son-in-law pull such a stunt? “All I know is: everyone is talking about it. Ticket sales went up, Solange’s album sales went up 200%,” Knowles said.

Of course, it should be noted that Beyoncé and her father don’t appear to be particularly close these days. She fired him as her manager in 2011, not long after her mother, Tina Knowles, filed divorce papers citing Mathew’s extramarital affair. It’s certainly likely that he is just as clueless about the motivating factor of the clash as anyone else.

As for the three main parties — that is Bey, Jay and Solange — they’ve remained relatively mum on the subject. Shortly after the footage leaked, the trio issued a statement calling the fight an “unfortunate incident” and a “private matter.”

[Billboard]

TIME movies

6 Movies Set on Labor Day That You Can Watch This Weekend

It's not quite as illustrious a group as those set on July 4th, but they'll certainly get the job done if you're looking to get in the end-of-summer spirit

Labor Day

Synopsis: It’s a rather apt way to start the list. The 2013 romance-drama starring Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin follows the plot of your typical, average Labor Day weekend: caring for your teenage son while beginning an affair with a ruggedly handsome escaped convict. We’ve all been there.

Where to watch: Rentable from Amazon Instant Video, Google Play, others.

Dirty Dancing

Synopsis: 1987. Dancing. Sexual awakenings. Patrick Swayze. Abortion. Lenny Briscoe from Law & Order. An investigation into the matter of whether Baby can actually be put into a corner. It all culminates on Labor Day weekend — in case you’re wondering how your summer might end.

Where to watch: Streaming on Netflix until Labor Day (Sept. 1) itself.

A Good Old-Fashioned Orgy

Synopsis: The 2011 ensemble comedy featuring a bunch of 30-something actors that you’d likely recognize (Jason Sudeikis, Lake Bell, Nick Kroll, Will Forte, etc.) is more or less about what the title indicates. If they were 20-somethings, it would have been on July 4th weekend rather than Labor Day.

Where to watch: A trip to your good, old-fashioned video rental store will be required (or you can buy a copy, including this one selling for $299)

Picnic

Synopsis: The 1955 film tells the story of what can happen in just 24 hours when one former college football star-turned-army man-turned-failed-actor (William Holden) visits a small Kansas town on Labor Day. It was nominated for six Academy Awards, and won for Best Film Editing and Best Art Direction-Set Direction.

Where to watch: See above (minus the $299 option).

Peyton Place

Synopsis: Unlike some of the others, 1956’s Peyton Place wasn’t set entirely on Labor Day, but it makes up for that by having Lana Turner and earning nine Academy Awards (not to mention inspiring a popular TV series that began in 1964).

Where to watch: Rentable from Google Play and others.

A Place in the Sun

Synopsis: The first of the Hollywood classics to be set on Labor Day, A Place in the Sun (1951) was an early twist on the classic love triangle tale. Starring Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift, it was nominated for nine Oscars and won six, including for Best Screenplay and Best Director.

Where to watch: Streaming for free via Amazon Prime Instant Video.

 

TIME Crime

The Homeless Man Miley Cyrus Brought to the VMAs Turned Himself in to Police

My Friend's Place representative Jesse accepts Video of the Year (on behalf of Miley Cyrus) for 'Wrecking Ball' onstage during the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards at The Forum on Aug. 24, 2014 in Inglewood, Calif.
My Friend's Place representative Jesse accepts Video of the Year (on behalf of Miley Cyrus) for 'Wrecking Ball' onstage during the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards at The Forum on Aug. 24, 2014 in Inglewood, Calif. Kevin Winter—Getty Images

Jesse Helt gained unwanted police attention after the wanted youth accepted Miley Cyrus' award for music video of the year

The homeless youth Miley Cyrus brought with her to MTV’s Video Music Awards last weekend turned himself in to Oregon police late Thursday night. Jesse Helt, 22, had an outstanding warrant for his arrest for violating his probation.

Cyrus had Helt accept her music video of the year award for “Wrecking Ball” in order to raise awareness for homeless youth. However, Helt’s appearance on the VMAs resulted raised flags among police in Oregon, where Helt is actually from.

Helt arrived in jail with 10% of his $25,000 bail, Sheriff Bob Wolfe told the Statesman Journal. In a Monday interview, Helt’s mother said that Cyrus had given Helt enough cash to visit home.

[Statesman Journal]

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