TIME NFL

Don’t Expect to See the Reinstated Ray Rice Play Anytime Soon

Ray Rice
In this Aug. 7, 2014, file photo, Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice smiles on the sideline during the second half of a preseason NFL on football game against the San Francisco 49ers in Baltimore. Nick Wass—ASSOCIATED PRESS

A former judge overturns Roger Goodell's indefinite suspension of Rice following his domestic violence incident. But will any team sign him?

Ray Rice is back—if anyone will have him.

Former federal judge Barbara Jones overturned the NFL’s indefinite suspension of Ray Rice Friday, calling the NFL’s decision to kick Rice out of the league, after a video emerged of him attacking his future wife in an Atlantic City elevator, an “abuse of discretion.”

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell originally suspended Rice for two games, but added to the penalty after the disturbing elevator video was made public; Jones is basically saying that the NFL should have gotten it right the first time. She noted that the NFL never asked Rice for the elevator video — which was in Rice’s possession — in its initial investigation. This mystifying decision will dog Goodell for a long, long time.

Goodell has said that the contents of the video clashed with Rice’s description of the event during their conversation. “What we saw was new evidence [the elevator tape] that was not consistent with what was described when we met with Ray and his representatives,” Goodell told USA Today in September.

Jones disagreed, saying that she “was not persuaded that Rice lied to, or misled, the NFL at his June interview.”

Her decision, just like former commissioner Paul Tagliabue’s reversal of Goodell’s Bountygate suspensions two years ago, is a stern rebuke of Goodell’s leadership. In response to Goodell’s recent suspension of Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, who pleaded no contest to one count of misdemeanor reckless assault in a child abuse case, players union chief DeMaurice Smith said when it comes to doling out player discipline, the NFL has “simply been making it up as they go along.” Jones’ ruling lends great credence to Smith’s position.

As for Rice, reinstatement does not mean teams will be lining up to sign him, at least not this season. He’s got a bunch of factors working against him. First, the video is still relatively fresh in the public’s mind: teams risk offending fans and sponsors if they bring him on board. Second, it’s so late in the season that the chances of Rice learning a team’s offense, and having a positive impact on the field, are fairly remote. So why risk the off-field backlash? And third, Rice was already showing signs of decline before the domestic violence incident. He averaged just 3.1 yards per carry in 2013, his sixth season, which was 22.5% off his prior career low.

After an off-season in which Rice can make a positive contribution to domestic violence education and eradication, while giving teams a full audition of his skills, a return seems more realistic. Second chances are given in sports. For now, however, Rice will almost certainly remain on the sidelines.

TIME Retail

Black Friday Gets a Little Less Frenzied

Only scattered reports of shopper scuffles and arrests

NEW YORK (AP) — Black Friday seemed a little less crazy this year.

There were squabbles here and there, and elbows got thrown, but the Friday morning crowds appeared smaller than usual and less frenzied, in part because many Americans took advantage of stores’ earlier opening hours to do their shopping on Thanksgiving Day.

That might be hard to stomach for people worried about commercial encroachment on Thanksgiving. But it is good news for bargain-hunters who hate crowds.

Whether it’s good news for retailers remains to be seen. Sales estimates for the start of the holiday shopping season will start trickling out later in the weekend.

Stores such as Wal-Mart and Target reported brisk Thanksgiving crowds. The colossal Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, said it drew 100,000 people between 5 p.m. Thursday and 1 a.m. Friday, nearly what it draws over a typical full day.

On Friday, plenty of shoppers were out, but it wasn’t elbow-to-elbow, said Moody’s analyst Michael Zucchero, at a mall in northern Connecticut.

“Traffic seems a little light,” he said. “Stores being open last night takes away some of the early birds.”

Brooklyn residents Paul and Mary Phillips shopped at Target, Old Navy and Marshalls on Friday at the Atlantic Terminal Mall in New York City. They picked DVD box sets for $5, marked down from $45, and speakers for $19, down from $50. They didn’t even have to wait in line.

“Because stores were open on Thursday, they’re not as crowded now,” Paul Phillips said.

There were scattered reports of shopper scuffles and arrests. In addition, protests were planned nationwide over minimum-wage laws and the grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri.

Protesters interrupted holiday shopping at major stores around St. Louis to vent their anger over the decision not to indict the police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown.

At least 200 protesters gathered at the Galleria Mall in Richmond Heights, about 10 miles south of Ferguson. Several stores lowered their security doors or locked outside entrances as protests sprawled onto the floor while chanting, “Stop shopping and join the movement.”

In Chicago, about 200 people demonstrated near the city’s popular Magnificent Mile shopping district, calling on people to boycott Black Friday shopping to show their solidarity with protesters in Ferguson.

Other disruptions: Best Buy’s website went down on Friday morning for about an hour. Spokesman Jeff Shelman said “a concentrated spike in mobile traffic” prompted the company to temporarily shut down the site. Online monitoring firm Dynatrace said Cabela’s, Foot Locker and J.C. Penney also had website problems.

Online shopping, especially on phones and tablets, may be siphoning off some shoppers from the malls.

IBM, which tracks online sales, said they rose 8 percent compared with Black Friday last year as of 3 p.m. E.T., with much-increased shopping on mobile devices.

In the stores, Toys R Us and Target executives said shoppers seem to be buying more than just the doorbusters and are filling their carts with items not on sale. That’s a sign that lower gas prices and an improving job picture are making shoppers more confident about opening their wallets.

At clothing stores, discounts were steep, with Old Navy offering up to half off everything. Best Buy offered $100 off some iPads. And Target slashed prices on TVs and video game consoles.

At the Westfield Fox Valley mall in Aurora, Illinois, the mood was calm. Some groggy shoppers were still in pajama pants, coffee in hand.

Kimberly States, shopping with her 11-year-old daughter, said it was markedly quieter around 6:30 a.m. Fridaythan the night before.

“It was a zoo last night around 10 p.m.,” States said. “Now it seems like more of the old folks.”

Last year, sales on Black Friday slumped 13.2 percent to $9.74 billion, according to ShopperTrak, which tracks data at more than 70,000 stores globally. Bill Martin, co-founder of ShopperTrak, said it is unclear how stores will fare this year.

Retailers have turned to Thanksgiving openings to stay competitive and avoid losing sales that have shifted earlier into the holiday, said Ramesh Swarmy, a retail partner at the Deloitte consulting firm.

The holiday weekend still sets the tone for the shopping season, whose sales this year are expected to rise 4.1 percent to $611.9 billion. That would be the biggest increase since 2011. Black Friday has been the biggest shopping day of the year since 2005.

Brian Cornell, who became Target’s CEO in August and was at a Target store in New York’s East Harlem neighborhood on Thursday, said shopping traditions have changed.

“It’s been more of a week event,” he said.

As a result, some Black Friday shoppers were disappointed by what was left on shelves.

Kathy Wise of Scottsdale, Arizona, started shopping at 5 a.m. with her mother-in-law, hitting Wal-Mart, Target, Toys R Us and Sports Authority.

“It’s not as busy today,” Kathy Wise said as the two combed through a shelf of Monster High dolls. They couldn’t find the one Kathy’s daughter wanted, and said it seemed as if some of the best deals and items were already gone.

“It’s kind of a bummer,” Wise said.

TIME Television

Watch Tina Fey and Amy Poehler Joke About Golden Globes Outfits

"That sounds gorgeant"

To the delight of many, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler will reunite to host the Golden Globes for the third year in a row this January. This newly released preview gives a good glimpse of what’s in store.

In the clip, Fey, whose character on 30 Rock was known to sing about food, joked about wearing a cheese romper, while Poehler says she’ll wear an “ER bandage dress with stilts.”

Unfortunately, the upcoming awards ceremony may be the last time fans of the Saturday Night Live catch the pair’s antics together at the Globes. The longtime friends have already said that 2015 will be their final time as hosts.

TIME Crime

Austin Police: More Than 100 Rounds Fired

A gunman identified by law enforcement sources as Larry Steve McQuilliams targeted buildings in downtown Austin including the Mexican consulate before being shot and killed by police on Nov. 28, 2014.
A gunman identified by law enforcement sources as Larry Steve McQuilliams targeted buildings in downtown Austin including the Mexican consulate before being shot and killed by police on Nov. 28, 2014. Laura Skelding—AP

(AUSTIN, Texas) — A gunman attempted to set the Mexican Consulate ablaze and fired more than 100 rounds at downtown buildings early Friday before he died, Austin authorities said.

Investigators were trying to determine the man’s motives after he began shooting at the consulate, Austin police headquarters, the U.S. courthouse and other locations.

Some of the buildings are near the popular Sixth Street entertainment district, where bars close at 2 a.m., about the same time the shootings began Friday. Police Chief Art Acevedo noted that thousands of people are typically on the street at that time.

“Many, many rounds were fired in downtown Austin,” Acevedo said. “With all the people on the streets, we’re very fortunate. I give thanks that no one but the suspect is injured or deceased.”

Mexico’s Foreign Relations Department issued a statement expressing “profound concern and condemnation” of the attack, but also said “there is no evidence the shots were exclusively directed at our facility.”

Acevedo said a sergeant who was holding the reins of two police horses after his patrol shot the gunman just outside the main entrance to police headquarters. But Acevedo said it’s not clear if police fatally shot the suspect or if he took his own life.

Police said the shooter was a man about 50 years old and with a criminal record. His identity was not immediately released and Acevedo said investigators had not yet established a motive.

The shooter’s targets were located throughout downtown Austin and officers received multiple reports of gunfire. The entire incident lasted about 10 minutes from the first call, Acevedo said.

Officers approached the man after he had been shot, but noticed cylinders in his vehicle, which was nearby, and discovered he was wearing a vest they thought may be rigged to explode. Officers retreated and a bomb squad was called. It was later determined the items were not explosive.

“Anytime you have cylinders like this with someone attacking government buildings, you have to think of explosive devices,” Acevedo said in describing the officers’ caution.

The suspect’s white van was still on the street outside police headquarters several hours after the shooting with all of its doors, the trunk and hood open while investigators looked it over.

The fire at the consulate was extinguished before any significant damage was done to the building. The federal courthouse’s guard house was shot several times, as was police headquarters, which Acevedo said was “extensively damaged.”

The governor’s mansion is a few blocks away from the police station; it’s not known whether Gov. Rick Perry was there at the time. Perry’s staff did not immediately return telephone and email messages seeking comment.

A police tactical team later went to an Austin apartment complex where the gunman lived as precaution. The FBI also was participating in the investigation.

Adam Peyton awoke Friday to the sight of SWAT vehicles and police officers on motorcycles in his southwest Austin neighborhood near the city’s well-known Zilker Park. Authorities evacuated some of Peyton’s neighbors close to the apartment where the gunman is believed to have lived.

Peyton described the area as “really laid back” and close-knit, where residents know each other and are often out walking their dogs.

“As soon as they show his face, we’ll instantly know,” he said.

TIME celebrities

Mickey Rourke Out-Boxes 29-Year-Old in Return to Ring

Mickey Rourke
US actor Mickey Rourke kisses his glove after beating his opponent Elliot Seymour of the United States, during their professional boxing match at the Luzhniki Stadium, in Moscow on Nov. 28, 2014. Denis Tyrin—AP

The actor says the sport 'sort of saved me from myself'

Actor Mickey Rourke, 62, defeated a 29-year-old opponent in an exhibition boxing match in Moscow Friday.

The Wrestler star hadn’t participated in a boxing match in more than 20 years, the BBC reports, when injuries resulted in corrective surgeries to his face that significantly altered his appearance. While Rourke didn’t explain his decision to return to the ring, he has said that boxing “sort of saved me from myself.”

“I’m very happy to be back to the boxing ring. Thank God for letting me do this,” he said before the fight.

Rourke’s opponent, Elliot Seymour, is a former California Golden Gloves champion.

[BBC]

TIME Mexico

How Mexico’s President Plans to Fix Police Corruption

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has unveiled a sweeping plan to overhaul the way the nation conducts local law enforcement, in the face of public anger over police corruption.

The reform, which requires the approval of the country’s legislators, would centralize much of the nation’s police units and provide for more uniform training.

Much of the Mexican law enforcement apparatus has long been considered corrupt, but protests have been reignited in recent months after the disappearance of 43 students, allegedly kidnapped my local police officials.

TIME Football

Ray Rice Suspension Overturned

Ray Rice
Ray Rice arrives for an appeal hearing of his indefinite suspension from the NFL on Nov. 5, 2014, in New York. Seth Wenig—AP

The NFL will "accept the ruling as binding"

Ray Rice has been reinstated into the NFL and could potentially play again, after winning an appeal Friday against his indefinite suspension from the league.

The former Baltimore Ravens running back was suspended in September after video emerged of him punching his wife unconscious in an elevator and then dragging her limp body out of the closing doors. The appeal to the suspension was heard by U.S. District Judge Barbara S. Jones. A NFL spokesman told ESPN that the league would “accept the ruling as binding.”

While the ruling means Rice is eligible to play in the NFL again, he will first have to find a team that will take him. The Ravens terminated his contract in September as the controversy surrounding the elevator incident grew.

[ESPN]

TIME United Nations

U.N. Panel Sharply Criticizes Police Brutality in U.S.

Ferguson
Atlanta Police in riot gear form a line on Williams Streets as protesters make their way down it in Atlanta, Ga. on Nov. 25, 2014, John Amis—AP

Michael Brown's parents testified before the committee

A United Nations panel criticized the United States for police brutality, military interrogations and excessive use of force by law enforcement in a report released Friday.

“There are numerous areas in which certain things should be changed for the United States to comply fully with the convention,” said Alessio Bruni, a member of the United Nations Committee Against Torture, referring to U.N. agreements on torture.

The panel released their report just days after violence erupted in Ferguson, Mo., following the announcement of a grand jury’s decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for shooting and killing unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

While the latest U.N. report did not mention Ferguson explicitly, Brown’s parents testified before the committee in Geneva earlier this month. And the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights who oversees the committee on torture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, raised concerns over “institutionalized discrimination in the U.S.” and added that he was unsure about whether the Ferguson grand jury’s decision complies with international human rights law.

“It is clear that, at least among some sectors of the population, there is a deep and festering lack of confidence in the fairness of the justice and law enforcement systems,” the commissioner said in a statement.

TIME health

How Dr. Alzheimer Discovered a Disease in a Mental Asylum

Alois Alzheimer
Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) Apic / Getty Images

The unusual case seemed to stick out and the psychiatrist sensed that there was something special about Auguste. Dr. Alois Alzheimer decided that he should see Auguste for himself

History News Network

This post is in partnership with the History News Network, the website that puts the news into historical perspective. The article below was originally published at HNN.

Carl didn’t know what was happening to his wife. The German railway clerk from Morfelder Landstasse and his wife Auguste had been happily married for twenty-eight years. They had one daughter, Thekla, and their marriage had always been harmonious; that is, until one Spring day in 1901 when Auguste suddenly exhibited signs of jealousy.

Auguste accused Carl of going for a walk with a female neighbor, and since then, she had been increasingly mistrustful. Carl thought that this sudden jealousy was unfounded. Over the next several months, Auguste’s memory began to fade. The once orderly and industrious homemaker was making uncharacteristic mistakes in preparing home meals — a task that she had probably performed countless times. She wandered aimlessly around the apartment, leaving housework unfinished. She became convinced that a cart driver who frequented their house was trying to harm her and that people were talking about her. Without explanation, she began to hide various objects around the house. The couple’s neighbors sometimes discovered Auguste ringing their doorbells for no reason.

Prior to this change, Auguste had never been seriously ill. She was an otherwise healthy 51-year old woman who did not drink alcohol nor suffered from any mental illness. By November of 1901, Carl was at wit’s end. He had no choice but to take his wife to the local mental asylum. The physician’s admittance note described her as suffering from a weak memory, persecution mania, sleeplessness, and restlessness that rendered her unable to perform physical or mental work.

The following day, the senior physician at the Asylum for the Insane and Epileptic in Frankfurt am Main came across Auguste’s clinical notes. The unusual case seemed to stick out and the psychiatrist sensed that there was something special about Auguste. It was the case that he was waiting for. Dr. Alois Alzheimer decided that he should see Auguste for himself.

Over the next several months, Dr. Alzheimer interviewed and examined Auguste, whose condition continued to deteriorate. He asked her to name common objects, perform simple arithmetic, tell him where she lived, what year it was, the color of snow, the sky, grass, and so on. Alzheimer maintained a detailed record and even arranged for Auguste to be photographed. One photo reveals a woman with a deeply furrowed forehead and heavy bags under her eyes. She was wearing a white hospital gown and her face had a tired, blank expression, with perhaps a hint of fear. Her hands were draped over her raised knees, with the long fingers securely interlocked.

What struck Dr. Alzheimer was Auguste’s relatively young age. He had seen cases of mental deterioration in much older patients and had theorized that age-related thickening of the brain’s blood vessels led to brain atrophy. It was unusual, however, to see the condition in a person who was only fifty-one years old. Dr. Alzheimer had only encountered one other case similar to Auguste’s. The autopsy findings on that patient revealed shrinkage in specific brain cells but no significant blood vessel thickening.

Dr. Alzheimer continued his daily visits and long conversations with Auguste. There was no cure, of course, and the limited treatments included the use of sedatives and warm baths. At times, Auguste had to be placed in isolation after she groped faces and struck other patients in the clinic. She wandered aimlessly, sometimes screamed for hours, and became increasingly hostile. By February of 1902, her condition had advanced to the point that long conversations and physical examinations became impossible.

On April 8, 1906, after nearly five years of progressive mental and physical decline, Auguste died. The official cause of death was blood poisoning due to bedsores. Dr. Alzheimer suspected that behind her mental illness was a strange disease, and that perhaps examining her brain would offer some clues. When he examined the brain sections under the microscope, his suspicion was confirmed. Dr. Alzheimer described changes in the neurofibrils — the protein filaments found in brain cells. He also saw peculiar deposits that he referred to a “millet seed-sized lesions.” These pathologic findings — now known as neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits – characterize the brains of Alzheimer’s Disease patients.

Dr. Alzheimer’s discovery was not immediately well received. In fact, the first time he presented Auguste’s case and autopsy findings during a German Psychiatry conference in 1906, the reception from the audience was rather cold. This was the time when psychoanalysis and the Freudian views on the relationship between childhood trauma and mental illness were, in today’s parlance, the “trending” topics in psychiatry. Correlating mental or neurologic disorders with histopathologic findings was not yet firmly established nor accepted. Ninety years later, in 1998, researchers re-examined Auguste’s original brain sections and confirmed the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques.

Emil Kraepelin, one of the most prominent psychiatrists in the early 1900s, first mentioned the term ‘Alzheimer’s Disease’ in the 1910 edition of his textbook on psychiatry. The disease was of course still poorly understood, but one of the most famous medical eponyms was born.

Today, there are an estimated five million Americans diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. The number is expected to rise as the population ages. There is no cure, and the burden on the afflicted as well as caregivers remains tremendous. The economic burden is also substantial, with healthcare costs for dementia in general estimated to be over $200 billion dollars in 2010. Researchers are on a quest to find effective treatment in areas that include stem cell and gene therapy.

Rod Tanchanco is a physician specializing in Internal Medicine. He writes about events and people in the history of medicine. His personal blog is at talesinmedicine.com.

References

Maurer K. Alzheimer : the life of a physician and the career of a disease. New York: Columbia University Press; 2003.

Graeber MB, Kösel S, Grasbon-Frodl E, Möller HJ, Mehraein P. Histopathology and APOE genotype of the first Alzheimer disease patient, Auguste D. Neurogenetics. 1998;1(3):223–8

TIME France

France Considers Backing Palestinian Statehood

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius during a debate on the recognition of the Palestinian at the French Parliament in Paris on Nov. 28, 2014.
French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius during a debate on the recognition of the Palestinian at the French Parliament in Paris on Nov. 28, 2014. Michel Euler—AP

France would join Sweden, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Spain

France may recognize Palestinian statehood if international attempts to broker a negotiated agreement between Israelis and Palestinians fall through.

If France’s parliament passes the non-binding motion on Tuesday, the nation would join Sweden, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Spain in pushing for a two-state solution to the long-lasting Israeli-Palestinian conflict by recognizing a Palestinian state, Reuters reported Friday.

“If this final effort to reach a negotiated solution fails, then France will have to do what it takes by recognizing without delay the Palestinian state,” said Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius before parliament. “We are ready.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu condemned the move as a “grave mistake.”

[Reuters]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser