TIME

LeBron James’ Homecoming Loss With Cavaliers Is Significant Albeit Briefly

LeBron James #23 of the Cleveland Cavaliers stands on the court during a game against the New York Knicks on Oct. 30, 2014 in Cleveland, Ohio.
LeBron James #23 of the Cleveland Cavaliers stands on the court during a game against the New York Knicks on Oct. 30, 2014 in Cleveland, Ohio. David Liam Kyle—NBAE/Getty Images

CLEVELAND — After all the breathless commercials and East 4th St. beer bashes, after all the white confetti tosses and red glow-stick shows, came a reminder to rollicking Quicken Loans Arena on Thursday night. Despite his size and strength, athleticism and intelligence, nothing goes precisely as planned for LeBron James. Even in the past four-and-a-half years, a glorious span that saw him reach four Finals and capture two championships, there was the decision, the bump, 9-8, Dallas, the clutch gene, good job good effort, the cramps, Game 6, the cramps again and San Antonio. Then he returned to Northeast Ohio this summer, and judging by the TV spots, he was home free.

James commands more attention than anyone in sports not simply because he is the world’s best basketball player. It’s also because the storylines around him never stay the same. One day, he can’t win the big one and the next he can’t lose. One day, he can’t hit the last shot and the next he can’t miss. The narratives — a modern catchphrase that seemed to be coined with him in mind — constantly shift under his Nikes. All summer, James was cast as the spotless homecoming king who could do no wrong, a role he filled with aplomb. But, realistically, it would only last until the first bad loss.

Over the past half-century, Cleveland has become intimately accustomed to disappointment, but not even the locals could fathom a newly formed super team dropping a home game on Opening Night to a Knicks squad starting Quincy Acy and Shane Larkin. The Cavaliers spent three months working themselves into a lather for this day; the Knicks hobbled in after a 24-point home loss to the Bulls the night before. James tossed the powder in the air. The crowd sang along with Usher to the national anthem. A 25,000-square foot banner was unfurled at Ontario and Huron. East 4th was as jammed as Bourbon St. The whole scene felt like a set-up for the homecoming king to post a triple-double and the Cavs to roll by 30.

“It was fun,” James said, “while it lasted.”

SI’s predictions for LeBron James’ first season back in Cleveland

In sports, unlike advertising, there is no script, and the Knicks ruined a great party with a shocking 95-90 win. James did not play a good game or even an average one. He made 5 of 15 shots, committed eight turnovers, and only found easy baskets when he was cherry picking Kevin Love outlets. He threw a pass into the seats when Kyrie Irving cut inside. He fouled Carmelo Anthony taking a three. He scrapped with Jason Smith of all people. Selecting a James highlight is hard, besides the lay-up he sank over Anthony, while being dragging down by the jersey.

“Emotions are going to run,” James said. “The crowd was excited, we were excited, everyone was excited. I tried to focus.” He acknowledged no nerves, but in the tunnel before warm-ups, he hopped up and down like a frenzied prizefighter. He let out an impromptu roar in the pre-game layup line. He tilted his head to the rafters before introductions. If he wasn’t overwhelmed, he was at least moved.

“Play the game, not the occasion,” cautioned David Blatt, Cleveland’s rookie coach. But, at morning shoot-around, James called the game “probably one of the biggest sporting events that’s up there ever.” He built it into something even more significant than it was. James attributed his struggles to the Cavaliers search for chemistry, a reasonable explanation, considering how quickly this roster was slapped together. In the first half, the Cavs moved the ball well, though at times they over-passed. In the second half, the offense stalled, as stars went one-on-one. The Cavs should score as easily as any team in the NBA, but occasionally they recalled the 2010-11 Heat, albeit without the frenetic defense.

“I think we spiked at a certain point,” Blatt said. “We’ve been excited about this game for a long time. We used that emotion in a positive way and then … we kind of dropped off the map.”

MCCALLUM: Meet the Cavaliers new well-traveled coach David Blatt

Blatt acknowledged that Cleveland must do a better job putting James in motion, which could mean more pick-and-rolls, particularly potent when run with Love. The Cavaliers don’t have time to regroup. They now embark on a challenging four-game road trip, with a date Friday in Chicago, followed by a test Tuesday in Portland. Perhaps they will find a bit of normalcy on the road, without Justin Bieber roaming the corridor outside their locker room, singing quietly to himself.

“It’s crazy,” said Cavs forward Tristan Thompson. “And it’s just beginning.”

If Cleveland takes a few weeks to find its groove, James will surely point back to those 2010-11 Heat, who proved a 9-8 start does not portend doom. Standing at his corner locker late Thursday night, he appeared unexpectedly upbeat, reviewing bad passes and missed shots with a self-deprecating smile. “I didn’t press,” he said. “I didn’t do much.”

The coronation did not go at all as planned, and in a way, that was appropriate. James traditionally does his best work in the crosshairs, when he is being doubted, not exalted. That’s part of the reason he appealed to this region in the first place. “Hard times are what we do,” said Cleveland mayor Frank Jackson, watching the game from a suite. “Challenges are part of life. It’s how you deal with it. He deals with it every time. That’s why he’s the best.”

The homecoming game will forever be part of the James oeuvre, another event that produced another storyline, significant until in a few hours the next one comes along.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME

Heavy Security as Israel Reopens Jerusalem Site

(JERUSALEM) — Israel has reopened a contested Jerusalem holy site and deployed hundreds of security personnel amid rising tensions in the city.

Muslim worshippers on Friday made their way through a welter of Israeli checkpoints to the site, known to Jews as the Temple Mount, and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary.

Police said that Muslim men over the age of 50 and women of all ages could attend the weekly prayers.

Israel closed the site after security forces shot and killed a Palestinian man suspected of attempting to assassinate a hard-line Jewish activist who advocates giving Jews greater access to the site.

Israeli-American rabbi Yehuda Glick was shot three times late Wednesday but his condition is now said to be improving.

Palestinians had condemned the closure as a “declaration of war.”

TIME fun

Feel Good Friday: 11 Fun Photos to Start Your Weekend

From the joy of the World Series to a grinning Pope Francis, here's a collection of photos to get your weekend started with a smile

TIME Careers & Workplace

1 Trick to Remember Even the Most Boring Information

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Katie Black Photography—Getty Images/Flickr RF

If you're not curious, you should be

Facing the unpleasant task of having to commit some dull facts or figures to memory? Now you don’t have to be that person fumbling for their notes or clicking frantically through slides during an important presentation. To kick your ability to recall information into overdrive, try piquing your curiosity, a new study suggests.

People are better at learning and remembering information they’re genuinely interested in, but researchers have discovered that a state of curiosity has a kind of halo effect on other, incidental or unrelated information we’re exposed to at the same time.

An NPR article points out this principle is useful for teachers who want to engage students by framing a lesson as a story or riddle, but as it turns out, the idea also might benefit grown-ups in the workforce.

“I think there are some useful ideas that can come out of our study with regard to adult learning,” says Charan Ranganath, a psychology professor at the University of California, Davis and one of the study’s authors, although he does caution that this is speculative.

Ranganath and his co-authors presented experiment subjects with both interesting and incidental information, and watched how these people processed it using MRIs. They found that a state of curiosity stimulates the brain’s pleasure centers.

What’s so special about curiosity that it has such a powerful effect? Ranganath suggests it’s an evolutionary response. “We are starting to think that the feeling of curiosity reflects a natural drive to reduce uncertainty in your understanding of the world,” he says. “So when you know something about a topic, but then find there is a gaping hole in your knowledge, you will feel the itch to get to the bottom of it,” he says.

Ranganath and his colleagues theorize this might be why we’re more receptive to remembering ancillary details unrelated to the object of our curiosity. “Our work suggests that the motivational state of high curiosity can help you more effectively retain what you learn,” he says.

If you’re faced with a memory task that doesn’t grab your attention, Ranganath suggests tricking your brain into engaging with the information by pinpointing a gap in your knowledge about a topic that interests you, then investigating it, before tackling the chore at hand. “If you have to learn something, it is important to stimulate your curiosity,” he says.

TIME Careers & Workplace

5 Justifiable Ways to Be Completely Ruthless

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Want to get to the top? You can't be nice all the time

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This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article below was originally published at Inc.com.

It’s often said that even the most respected leaders are considered by many to be ruthless, even brutal at times. Of course, often when leaders are perceived as merciless, that hard perception belongs to those who did not deserve any mercy.

Great leaders have to be tough and decisive. Often their decisions will displease many, but they can’t effectively lead if every decision is the result of democracy or consensus. This is the difficult path for the leader. It’s easy to stay popular when you appease everyone, but rarely will that drive a large organization to success. They must make the best decision taking all the needs and wants into account. Ultimately, they have to lead the way or step aside.

Here are five ways a leader must be uncompromising and perhaps ruthless in order to benefit a loyal following. See if you have the strength to be tough when needed.

1. Drive the vision.

Despite the arguments from proponents of flat management, most companies can’t move forward without strong vision and a leader ready to move the organization forward despite the risks and stress. Great leaders know when to push or pull the team down the road in order to break the inertia.

2. Protect the team.

Not everyone is a great fit on every team. Well-meaning people can be disruptive and difficult given the wrong set of circumstances. A great leader understands when dysfunction is beyond repair and must make the cut so the team can survive despite individual consequences.

3. Weather the storm

Business can be unpredictable. Just when you think things are calm, something like the financial crisis of 2008 comes along and destroys every bit of safety you built over decades. Great leaders know that this is the time to make decisions that may hurt the few in order to save the many. They must maintain strength at the expense of collateral damage so that all don’t perish.

4. Maintain morale.

Great leadership requires strength, structure, stability and decisiveness. When a team is surrounded by chaos, inaction and indecision productivity drops along with morale. Strong leaders know that running a tight ship allows for the team to be more carefree and opens the door for enjoyment and, ultimately, the kind of innovation that breeds genuine excitement making small personal sacrifices of freedom worth the price.

5. Preserve the culture.

Not every team can survive a wide variety of personality traits. Companies that scale tightly define their culture and use it as a tool to weed out those who may cause growth to slow. Great leaders continuously define and refine the culture to reward those who can conform and excel while ruthlessly eliminating those who won’t be a fit for the long haul. On the bright side, those people will be free to find an environment where they can thrive and be happy rather than living in frustration and mediocrity.

TIME technology

7 Ways Satya Nadella’s Microsoft Is Completely Transformed

Microsoft Corp Chief Executive Officer Satya NadellaSpeaks At Company Event
Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

It’s not even nine months into the Satya Nadella era of Microsoft and the new CEO is making his mark. Notably, his Microsoft is smaller after completing this week most of the 18,000 job cuts he announced in July. Whether Nadella’s plans for Microsoft succeed, it’s clear the company is dramatically different from the Microsoft that ruled the technology industry in the 80s and 90s. The Microsoft that Nadella leads has strayed so far from its original incarnation that it seems in some ways to have become nearly its opposite. Here are seven examples of how today’s Microsoft is different from the juggernaut Bill Gates built.

1. Microsoft has a kinder, gentler CEO. Bill Gates frequently hurled verbal abuse at employees and was coldblooded about deploying predatory practices against competitors. Steve Ballmer had a reputation for hurling chairs and inspiring the rank and file in manic, sweat-soaked diatribes. Both heightened Microsoft’s image as a hard-charging software giant.

Nadella is cut from a different cloth entirely. Yes, his mansplaining about salaries revealed an ability to insert his foot in his mouth, but most accounts of his temperament describe a low-key and humble personality at odds with those of his predecessors. He communicates not in fist-pumping speeches but lengthy memos on strategy.

2. The tables have turned in the Microsoft-Apple rivalry. For decades, Apple had but a sliver of the market share for personal computers. In 2014, Apple is not onlyshipping more personal computers – counting the ones that fit in our pockets – it’s making much more money from them. Apple made $156 billion in revenue from iPhones, iPads and Macs in the last year. And Microsoft? Between Windows and Office software, Nokia phones and Surface tablets, it saw about $23 billion in revenue.

3. Microsoft isn’t a monopoly, but it competes with some. Gates never got the stranglehold he wanted on the Web, thanks to antitrust lawsuits and the Internet’s decentralized structure. And today, Microsoft is just one more company fighting for turf in a variety of markets: enterprise software, game consoles, search and, yes, personal computers.

And anyway, monopolies in the Internet era aren’t quite what they used to be. Yes, Amazon is bullying publishers but it’s pushing prices down, not up. Yes, Google dominates in search but it costs consumers nothing to find a perfectly good alternative like Bing. Neither of those companies is exactly stifling innovation but rather investing heavily in new technologies.

4. Microsoft isn’t really a Windows-driven company. And not just because PC sales have been declining for years. It’s more because Microsoft under Ballmer expanded into gaming and enterprise software markets. Under Nadella, these are becoming an even bigger part of the business. Enterprise offerings like server and storage software, cloud computing and consulting services made up 53% of revenue last quarter. Xbox made up 7%. Windows and Office were only 18%.

5. Microsoft has stopped worrying and learned to love open. Or at least it’s trying. Where Ballmer called the Linux open-source operating system a “malignant cancer,” Nadella proclaims, “Microsoft loves Linux.” All along, Nadella has said Microsoft needs to develop its own platform while playing well with others. Thefitness tracker Microsoft announced Thursday works with Windows as well as Android and iOS phones. Its Office programs work on those platforms too, even though that approach is leaving Microsoft vulnerable to upstarts.

6. It’s not exactly a growth company anymore. In the mid-90s, Microsoft’s revenue was growing by nearly 40% a year. It’s risen an average of 8.5% a year over the past two years, although that pace could increase this year under Nadella. Wall Street demands from Microsoft the kinds of hefty payouts older, slow-growth companies offer: Last year, Microsoft spent $4.9 billion on buybacks and $9.3 billion on dividends. Taken together, that’s more than Microsoft spend on R&D.

7. But it’s slowly gaining cachet among young geeks. A generation of software engineers grew up in the 80s and 90s loathing Microsoft – calling it evil, the Borg, or worse. But for those who came to know Microsoft not through Windows but the Xbox console and Halo franchise, the feelings range from indifferent to positive.

The $2.5 billion purchase of Mojang may or may not make Microsoft a cool brand. But it will wash away the hostility that the Microsoft brand inspired only a dozen years ago. Most kids who love Minecraft seem to think of Microsoft as a big corporation that won’t hurt and might even help Minecraft develop. That generational shift in sentiment may be the most dramatic evidence of how Microsoft has changed.

TIME Video Games

The 5 Best PC Games Right Now

An essential video game checklist for new PC owners

Wading into the PC games scene if you’re a new PC gamer is like coming across one of those museum-sized history wall maps where every time period’s displayed at once. Because the PC’s been more or less a continuous platform, you have a daunting number of choices. This isn’t a “best PC games of all time” list, therefore, so much as a best ones at the moment.

  • Divinity: Original Sin

    Divinity: Original Sin‘s story about a mystery energy source and murder and you eventually getting really, really powerful is just the glaze on a nostalgic banquet of classic gaming bullet points: stat-riddled character forging, a massive multi-environmental fantasy world, open-ended storytelling, tactically intricate combat in rounds, a laundry list of spells and skills and enemies and loot, cooperative multiplayer and a do-it-yourself toolkit, all rolled into an old-school-meets-new-tech isometric roleplaying package.

    Buy this game if… You have positive history with isometric party-based roleplaying games, you loved the decades-ago Ultima games, or you’ve always wanted to see what an older-school isometric RPG might look like skinned with contemporary design ideas.

    Steer clear if… You’re no fan of roleplaying games, or anything with lots of fiddly stats and systems and arcane terminology.

    What critics said: “The most creative turn-based combat seen in an RPG, combined with a dash of humor, has resulted in a fine stew of gaming” (Quarter to Three); “A potent, frustrating, demanding, amusing, tedious, exhilarating world unto itself” (RPG Fan); “Complex yet approachable, nostalgic yet modern, cliché-ridden yet strange and singular in so many ways” (Polygon).

    ESRB Rating: Mature

  • Guild Wars 2

    Guild Wars 2 isn’t something that grabs you off the block, like, say, the series premiere of Breaking Bad. It takes awhile to get rolling. But once it does, it’s hands down the best online multiplayer romp on the planet, obsessed with keeping you entertained in a way that’s constantly diverting: have snowball fights, hunt for worm eggs in ice caverns, play a barrel-tossing game, gather scraps to build snowmen, protect towns from sweeping bear horde assaults and knock out enemy portals that spawn creatures like The Avengers‘ Chitauri. It’s simply the pinball machine of MMOs.

    Buy this game if… You’re up for trying an MMO, you want an MMO you can actually dip into and out of, you don’t want to pay a monthly fee but also want freemium content that’s basically invisible, or you love games that relentlessly upend and exceed your expectations.

    Steer clear if… Sprawling fantasy funhouses aren’t your thing.

    What critics said: “…one of those rare games that knocks your life off-kilter like a meteoroid banging into a satellite” (TIME); “…what happens when a group of talented, smart, dedicated, imaginative, bold, consumer-friendly creators get together and spend years solving problems and making something wonderful” (Quarter to Three); “…rewards skill and variety rather than mindless grinding” (Polygon).

    ESRB Rating: Teen

  • Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft

    Part of the allure of Blizzard rolling its bejeweled carriage through the hoof-tramped mud of a played-out genre (collectible card games) is the Blizzard name. But that names signifies scrupulous playtesting and elaborate design values, all of which converge here to make Hearthstone the quickest, slickest, goofiest, most lavish online CCG around.

    Buy this game if… You’ve always been curious about CCGs and want the fastest, friendliest introduction to the genre.

    Steer clear if… You’re not a competitive card gamer.

    What critics said: “…overflowing with character and imagination, feeds off and fuels a vibrant community of players” (Eurogamer); “It has, through painstaking effort, upgraded the card duel into a thoroughly modern form” (Edge); “…successfully pulled me into a genre that I didn’t care about in the least” (Polygon).

    ESRB Rating: Teen

  • Legend of Grimrock II

    Legend of Grimrock II harks back to PC gaming days when who cared that some crazy dude even more crazily turned an entire island into a flaming, monster-riddled, spike-suffused death trap–just go with it. This is a game about the game, not plot plausibility, though it tells a decent enough rip. It’s a grid-based dungeon crawler nonpareil, and just about the best one yet made.

    Buy this game if… You miss Wizardry, Dungeon Master and Eye of the Beholder, you want to play a modern exemplar of the whole “grid-based dungeon spelunking” thing.

    Steer clear if… Fixed first-person perspective freaks you out.

    What critics said: “…another glorious glimpse of the past, a window to a genre dead and buried and brought back to life with care and respect” (GameSpot); “…Almost Human may be looking to the past for inspiration, but it’s created one of the best pure role-playing games of the year” (Eurogamer); “…a puzzle box within which are a hundred more such boxes within which are yet more” (RPG Fan).

    ESRB Rating: Unrated

  • Shovel Knight

    The best NES game you never played sporting glorious high-definition pixel-block levels and incredible chiptunes and superlative platform-bounding gameplay? Shovel Knight is something like a crowdfunded miracle, the new archetype in gaming (or any other creative medium) for what letting developers who know exactly what they’re doing actually do it, unencumbered.

    Buy this game if… You miss the 8-bit NES aesthetic, you want to play the apotheosis of the best side-scrolling, platforming games popularized by Nintendo’s breakthrough 1980s system.

    Steer clear if… You don’t have (or care to own) a gamepad for your PC.

    What critics said: “The graphics, gameplay, and soundtrack are all pitch-perfect for an NES game… all you’re missing is the original cartridge” (USgamer); “…a game that is as bright, rich, and lovely as nostalgia would have us believe our favorite NES games always were” (Kill Screen); “…a game that handles like a brick that handles like a Maserati” (Wired).

    ESRB Rating: Everyone

TIME Terrorism

U.S. Military Ups Vigilance as Fears Mount of Fresh ISIS-Inspired Attacks

William Mayville
Army Lt. Gen. William Mayville, Jr., speaks about the operations to target the Khorasan Group in Syria on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, during a news conference at the Pentagon. Cliff Owen—AP

Defense officials are fearful that their personnel may be targeted after receiving public threats from terrorists operating in the Middle East

The U.S. military is stepping up measures to protect against potential Islamic State and Greater Syria (ISIS) directed or inspired attacks following an uptick in threats coming from the Jihadist group.

Late last week, the Pentagon reportedly described service members and law enforcement officers as “legitimate targets” in an internally circulated memo sent out to its employees, according to the Military Times. The message came days after a lone gunman went on a shooting rampage at the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa, killing one soldier.

“We disseminated this advisory, not because of a specific threat, but as a reminder for Pentagon employees to be vigilant at home, at work, during travel and in their communities, by using individual protective measures,” Christopher Layman, a spokesman for the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, told the Military Times.

Likewise, the Marine Corps sent out an announcement calling on troops to report “even the most minor suspicious activity” and to be prudent when posting messages on social media.

Officials at MacDill Air Force Base overseeing the 6th Air Mobility Wing in Tampa, Fla., also reportedly instructed troops to keep a low profile and avoid public affiliation with the military.

According to a dossier compiled for the U.N. Security Council, an estimated 15,000 individuals have travelled to Syria and Iraq to fight alongside ISIS and other militant organizations. The large number of fighters receiving training with such groups has raised fresh fears among law enforcement and military officials in the U.S. and abroad of attacks in their own countries should they return home.

[Military Times]

TIME Food & Drink

Starbucks Announces Plans for Coffee Delivery Service

Paper cups of different sizes are seen on display at Starbuck's first Colombian store at 93 park in Bogota
Paper cups of different sizes are seen on display at Starbuck's first Colombian store at 93 park in Bogota July 16, 2014. John Vizcaino—Reuters

The service will launch in select markets during the second half of 2015

If you’re one of those people that can’t start their day without a cup of Starbucks coffee, you may soon have to go no further than your front door.

During the company’s Thursday earnings conference call, CEO Howard Schultz outlined plans to begin a food and beverage delivery service late next year, according to NBC.

The deliveries will be available to the chain’s loyalty program customers in a few specific markets at first, and will be integrated into a new Starbucks mobile app set to debut in Portland, Ore., next month before expanding to the rest of the country. The app will also allow users to order and pay with their phones.

“Imagine the ability to create a standing order of Starbucks delivered hot to your desk daily,” Schultz said, calling the initiative their version of “e-commerce on steroids.”

TIME India

Unwed Indian Moms Applying for Child’s Passport Are Asked if They Were Raped

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Visage—Getty Images

They also need to file an affidavit detailing how the child was conceived, a lawyer for the Indian government said

Unwed mothers in India applying for a passport for their child will have to reveal how the child was conceived and specify whether they were raped, a lawyer representing the Indian government told the Bombay High Court on Thursday.

The revelation came during a petition hearing by a 21-year-old woman who was denied a passport that had her stepfather’s name on it, the Times of India reported. The regional passport officer refused to accept the name of her mother instead, saying she needed a court order appointing the stepfather as her legal guardian.

According to the Times, one of the two judges hearing the case asked as an aside: “We were wondering what happens in the case of an unwed mother?”

Advocate Purnima Bhatia, representing the government, responded by saying mothers without husbands must file an affidavit that mentions how the child was conceived, whether the mother was raped, and why she does not wish to reveal the father’s name.

According to Mumbai-based women’s-rights lawyer Flavia Agnes, only the third of those conditions would be in any way justifiable. “These are ridiculous rules the government is making,” Agnes tells TIME. “Why should she say whether she was raped or whether she had consensual sex?”

According to the Times, Bhatia told the bench that the rules were detailed in the passport manual, which could not be shown to the court as it was a classified document. The judges reportedly responded by saying that the manual came under internal instructions and so could not be classified, and also did not have the force of the law.

Agnes says she has clashed with passport authorities in the past, over issues like divorced women prevented from continuing to use their former spouse’s name or married women not being allowed to continue using their maiden names. She plans to take this issue up as well, whether it escalates or not.

Sunitha Krishnan, founder of women-and-children’s-advocacy organization Prajwala, says the Foreign Ministry’s response is “deeply disturbing” and speaks to a larger malaise in Indian society.

“It’s so painful that a woman has to keep justifying and defending her position,” she says, citing her long battle to get children of prostitutes admitted into schools that insisted on a father’s name.

“When an unwed mother is asked dehumanizing questions like have you been raped, I don’t know which era we’re living in,” adds Krishnan. “I don’t think a man would ever be asked such questions.”

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