TIME advertisements

The Mad Men Finale Wasn’t a Paid Ad for Coke

"No money exchanged hands"

If you haven’t been hiding under a rock for the past day or so, you know that the AMC series Mad Men ended with the iconic “I’d like to buy the world a Coke” ad Sunday night. And it turns out Coke neither paid nor received any money for the inclusion in the show.

A Coke spokesman told People that “no money exchanged hands” as part of the show. While Coke did know that its brand would play into the finale, officials say they were not aware exactly how the show would end.

Read more at People.

TIME Yotaphone

This Crazy New Phone isn’t Like Anything You’ve Ever Seen

Courtesy of Yotaphone

This new phone has an LCD screen and an electronic paper screen

A mobile phone with two screens is now available through an IndieGoGo campaign, and it sure is something else.

The Yotaphone 2, as its known, has one LCD screen similar to that of an iPhone or an Android. On the back, though, the device has a second screen more similar to a Nook or Kindle e-reader. Yotaphone claims this is the first-ever dual screen smartphone.

Pre-ordering the phone through Indiegogo will set you back $550. For the first 48 hours of the campaign, it is discounted to $525. The phone is eventually expected to retail for $600.

Shipments are expected to be start in August.

More than $75,000 has already been raised by the campaign through the first six hours after being posted Tuesday.

The phone will also have native apps, just like other smartphones. A portable wireless charger is also available from the IndieGoGo page.

TIME Brands

These Are the 10 Most Purchased Brands in the World Right Now

Coca-Cola Buys North American Bottling Operations Of Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. For $12.3 Billion
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images Coca-Cola can and bottle images appear on the side of a trailer outside the Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. bottling facility in Niles, Illinois, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 25, 2010.

Some sweet news for soda

Coca-Cola held onto its crown as the most-purchased brand in the world last year in spite of a push for healthier fare.

Coke came out on top of the latest annual Brand Footprint study from U.K. market research firm Kantar Group, which analyzed and ranked 11,000 global brands, Business Insider reports. Kantar awarded the Coca-Cola Company brand a score of 5.7 million “consumer reach points” (CRP) — a metric that tracks the number of households buying a product and the frequency of those purchases.

Coca-Cola easily beat out its closest competitors: Colgate came in second with 3.9 million CRP, while Nestlé-owned Maggi scored 2.8 million.

Dove, which is owned by Unilever, was the fastest-growing brand in the top 10, moving up three spots to No. 9 on Kantar’s ranking. Dove, which actually sparked a bit of a backlash with its recent “Choose Beautiful” ad campaign, sells personal care products that include soaps, moisturizers and deodorants.

The rest of the top 10 brands included another Unilever property, soap brand Lifebuoy, at No. 4. That was followed by instant-coffee brand Nescafé, PepsiCo brands Pepsi and Lay’s, and dried foods brand Knorr, respectively. Procter & Gambles’ Tide detergent brand rounded out the ranking.

TIME Autos

Airbag Supplier Takata to Declare Defects in 33.8 Million Vehicles

The announcement could prompt the single largest recall in U.S. history

Japanese airbag manufacturer Takata Corp. will reportedly declare another 33.8 million vehicles with its equipment to be defective, roughly doubling the number of vehicles subject to recall notices over the company’s airbags.

Takata is expected to announce the defects on Tuesday, according to several U.S. officials who disclosed the details to Detroit Motor News. Automakers will then review the findings to determine if the affected vehicles must be recalled for repairs. If the vehicles are recalled, it would mark one of the largest consumer recalls in American history.

The defective airbags have already prompted automakers to recall 17 million vehicles in the U.S. after a potentially lethal fault was discovered in Takata’s airbag inflator in 2013. At least six deaths and 100 injuries have been linked to a fault that causes the airbags to suddenly explode, sending metal scraps flying into the cabin.

Regulators with the National Highway Safety Administration have launched an extended investigation into Takata Corp., pressuring the company to expand its defect notices to consumers.

TIME Companies

Why Iowa Is Mad at IBM

$50 million in incentives didn't stop hundreds of recent layoffs

IBM has drawn the ire of Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley over reports the company is firing hundreds of employees in the state.

Grassley wrote a letter to IBM CEO Ginni Rometty recently seeking answers, and Bloomberg reported Tuesday that the company cut about 700 jobs in Dubuque, Iowa, where it opened a global delivery center in 2009. The Dubuque location once employed as many as 1,300 people, but had reportedly shrunk to more than 800 employees even before this year’s layoffs.

The layoffs follow roughly $50 million that city and the state of Iowa spent on incentives to lure the company. IBM didn’t comment on specific employment figures. “IBM is constantly investing in skills to meet the demands of our clients, especially in areas such as Cloud, Analytics, Mobile, Social and Security,” spokesman Adam Pratt told Bloomberg.

IBM has also drawn the ire of local officials in Columbia, Missouri, where the company also reportedly engaged in recent layoffs. Last month, Missouri suspended tax credits IBM had been receiving as part of a previous promise to create up to 800 jobs at its service center in Columbia. The state suspended the incentives after employment at the center fell below a 500-job threshold.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

MONEY Best Places

These Are the 25 Best Cities for Finding a Job

Chamber of Commerce, Raleigh, NC
Visions of America—UIG via Getty Images Chamber of Commerce, Raleigh, NC

A new report shows the best places to find a new gig.

A new Glassdoor study ranked America’s 50 biggest cities and come up with the best 25 for workers.

The formula weights each city’s housing affordability, how employees rate their job satisfaction on Glassdoor’s site, and how easy it is to get a job (the ratio of openings to population).

Thanks in great part to its location in the university-heavy “Research Triangle,” Raleigh, N.C., is the top-rated metropolitan area for jobs. Like Austin and Seattle, which also rank in the top five, the city has benefitted from a tech boom in recent years, as companies and workers have left higher-cost areas like San Francisco and New York.

Scroll down for the top 25 cities—or check out the full ranking at Glassdoor, which has Riverside, Calif., and Las Vegas landing at the bottom of the list.

  1. Raleigh, NC – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.1
  • Number of Job Openings: 24,146
  • Population: 1,242,974
  • Median Base Salary: $50,950
  • Median Home Value: $198,400
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.3
  1. Kansas City, MO – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 28,786
  • Population: 2,071,133
  • Median Base Salary: $46,000
  • Median Home Value: $138,500
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Oklahoma City, OK – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 16,759
  • Population: 1,336,767
  • Median Base Salary: $38,100
  • Median Home Value: $129,400
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.3
  1. Austin, TX – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 33,198
  • Population: 1,943,299
  • Median Base Salary: $50,000
  • Median Home Value: $226,400
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.3
  1. Seattle, WA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 69,423
  • Population: 3,671,478
  • Median Base Salary: $70,000
  • Median Home Value: $344,700
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.3
  1. Salt Lake City, UT – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.8
  • Number of Job Openings: 17,970
  • Population: 1,153,340
  • Median Base Salary: $44,000
  • Median Home Value: $224,000
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.4
  1. San Jose, CA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.7
  • Number of Job Openings: 51,439
  • Population: 1,952,872
  • Median Base Salary: $99,000
  • Median Home Value: $863,800
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.5
  1. Louisville, KY – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.7
  • Number of Job Openings: 16,295
  • Population: 1,269,702
  • Median Base Salary: $40,000
  • Median Home Value: $131,100
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. San Antonio, TX – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.7
  • Number of Job Openings: 29,980
  • Population: 2,328,652
  • Median Base Salary: $40,000
  • Median Home Value: $147,600
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.3
  1. Washington, D.C. – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.7
  • Number of Job Openings: 116,770
  • Population: 6,033,737
  • Median Base Salary: $61,000
  • Median Home Value: $361,200
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.4
  1. St. Louis, MO – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.7
  • Number of Job Openings: 31,365
  • Population: 2,806,207
  • Median Base Salary: $45,000
  • Median Home Value: $133,200
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.3
  1. San Francisco, CA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.7
  • Number of Job Openings: 94,933
  • Population: 4,594,060
  • Median Base Salary: $70,000
  • Median Home Value: $728,000
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.5
  1. Columbus, OH – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 25,242
  • Population: 1,994,536
  • Median Base Salary: $43,000
  • Median Home Value: $146,700
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 102,311
  • Population: 6,954,330
  • Median Base Salary: $50,000
  • Median Home Value: $157,900
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Boston, MA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 86,565
  • Population: 4,732,161
  • Median Base Salary: $56,000
  • Median Home Value: $367,600
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.4
  1. Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 48,231
  • Population: 3,495,176
  • Median Base Salary: $52,000
  • Median Home Value: $210,300
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Atlanta, GA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 69,642
  • Population: 5,614,323
  • Median Base Salary: $49,180
  • Median Home Value: $155,200
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Memphis, TN – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 14,776
  • Population: 1,343,230
  • Median Base Salary: $42,000
  • Median Home Value: $107,000
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Indianapolis, IN – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 23,863
  • Population: 1,971,274
  • Median Base Salary: $44,000
  • Median Home Value: $130,100
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Chicago, IL – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 124,633
  • Population: 9,554,598
  • Median Base Salary: $50,000
  • Median Home Value: $186,900
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Houston, TX – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 74,442
  • Population: 6,490,180
  • Median Base Salary: $52,000
  • Median Home Value: $157,900
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Baltimore, MD – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 45,558
  • Population: 2,785,874
  • Median Base Salary: $46,000
  • Median Home Value: $244,100
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Richmond, VA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 17,933
  • Population: 1,260,029
  • Median Base Salary: $45,000
  • Median Home Value: $186,300
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2
  1. Pittsburgh, PA – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.1
  • Number of Job Openings: 29,456
  • Population: 2,355,968
  • Median Base Salary: $43,000
  • Median Home Value: $124,500
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.1
  1. Nashville, TN – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.1
  • Number of Job Openings: 27,850
  • Population: 1,792,649
  • Median Base Salary: $41,600
  • Median Home Value: $176,700
  • Job Satisfaction Rating: 3.2

 

TIME commodities

Why Bacon Is Suddenly Everywhere

200418761-001
Paul Taylor—Getty Images Strips of bacon

Nowadays, there are bacon mints. Even toiletries feature bacon.

How did we get here? One reason is cultural. Another is economical. Bacon costs the least it has in five years and is valued at nearly half of what it was a year ago, Bloomberg reports. That dip has helped bring the price of bacon down by 25% since last year, per United States Department of Agriculture data, to $4.12 per pound this week.

One can see the falling price of pork and the meat’s correlative rise in popularity in the following two charts, both based on USDA data. The first shows the declining cost, and the second charts an expected surge in consumption:

Businesses are also making a killing on the numbers. “Even though retail prices are down, consumers paid more than seven times the wholesale price for bacon last month,” Bloomberg reports. Not a bad incentive for cooks to clamber for swine.

It helps further bacon’s dominance that adding it to foodstuffs has taken on the presence of an Internet meme. Between the meat-rich Paleo Diet fad and a cult-like fascination with the meat, its hard to escape the strips’ crunchy, sizzling charm.

TIME Fast Food

KFC Is Bringing Colonel Sanders Back

In the form of Darrell Hammond

Following the news earlier this month that the Hamburglar is being brought back by McDonald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken announced Tuesday that another beloved fast food mascot is coming back to TV: Colonel Sanders.

Commercials featuring the white-suited, Southern-accented chicken honcho, played in this iteration by Saturday Night Live alum Darrell Hammond, will start airing on May 25. The iconic mascot, based on the real founder of KFC, is being trotted out again as part of the brand’s 75th anniversary. It’s the first time in decades that the Sanders character, played by an actual actor, has been front and center in advertisements.

The move comes amid years of struggles for KFC in the United States. Chick-Fil-A passed it in sales last year.

KFC is owned and operated by Yum! Brands.

See one of the new ads featuring Hammond above.

Bringing back the Colonel isn’t the only change KFC is making. It’s also changing packaging and the look of its restaurants, and introducing new menu items including baked beans and lemonade.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

MONEY 401(k)

How the Supreme Court Just Improved Your Retirement

The Supreme Court just ruled on an obscure aspect of ERISA. It could be great news for your retirement nest egg.

The Supreme Court just handed millions of retirement savers a helping hand.

You many not know much about ERISA, the body of rules that governs retirement accounts. But chances are you have a 401(k). That means Monday’s Supreme Court decision could indirectly lower investment fees you’re paying. And that’s great news.

On Monday the Supreme Court made it easier for 401(k) investors to sue employers over needlessly costly 401(k) investments. The actual point of contention in the case, known as Tibble vs. Edison, was pretty obscure. It involved how the statute of limitations should be applied to a breach of fiduciary duty.

But because ERISA law is so complicated, companies almost always choose to fight such suits on technical grounds. This time around, the typically business friendly U.S. Supreme Court decided in favor of investors, unanimously overruling the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. As a result, employers will be forced to think a little harder about whether similar arguments are likely to prevail in the future.

But the fact is, employers have grown increasingly proactive about regulating plan fees. The reason: Tibble vs. Edison is just a high-profile example of a series of lawsuits launched in the past decade over employers’ failure to police exorbitant retirement plan fees. And many large employers have already reacted to the threat by urging investment firms to lower fees for their employees. As a result, 401(k) plan fees have come down, and investors have had greater access to low-cost options like index funds.

With the Supreme Court weighing in on investors’ side, you can expect that trend to continue.

 

TIME apps

Don’t Worry, Spotify Isn’t Killing Free Streaming

SWEDEN-MUSIC-COMPANY-SPOTIFY
Jonathan Nackstrand—AFP/Getty Images This photo illustration shows a woman as she uses the iPhone application of Swedish music streaming service Spotify on March 7, 2013 in Stockholm, Sweden.

A spokesperson flatly denies that Spotify's freemium model is floundering

Spotify is refuting recent reports that it would pull the plug on its free streaming music service, leaving listeners no alternative but to pay up.

“It’s totally false,” a Spotify spokesperson told Music Business Worldwide. The dismissal came in response to unnamed sources, quoted by Digital Music News, who claimed that music labels were pressuring Spotify to cap its free streaming service at three months.

The report comes amid grumbling from industry insiders that Spotify’s freemium model may not generate enough revenue to support music labels, a complaint famously echoed by singer Taylor Swift and hotly contested by Spotify’s CEO. Apple is also said to be pressuring labels to stop supporting Spotify’s free streaming tier ahead of the rumored launch of its own new streaming service.

“The model is working,” Spotify’s spokesperson insisted.

 

 

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