TIME movies

Amy Pascal Will Step Down From Sony Pictures Top Job

Amy Pascal
Jordan Strauss—AP Amy Pascal, Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chairperson, arrives at Variety's 5th Annual Power of Women event at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills on Oct. 4, 2013

Less than three months after Sony hack revealed embarrassing emails

Sony announced Thursday morning that Amy Pascal will step down from the top job in its movies division.

The company announced Pascal will transition from her role as co-chairman of Sony Pictures Entertainment and chairman of the company’s motion picture group to instead “launch a major new production venture at the studio” beginning in May 2015, Deadline reports. She will also be a producer on the new Ghostbusters film and future Amazing Spider-Man movies, according to the Hollywood Reporter (THR).

“I have spent almost my entire professional life at Sony Pictures and I am energized to be starting this new chapter based at the company I call home,” Pascal said in a statement.

Pascal has been with Sony since 1988. One of her biggest boons for the company was leading the Spider-Man franchise, which at nearly $4 billion is the highest-grossing superhero franchise in Hollywood, and under her leadership, Sony Pictures had 95 movies that hit No. 1 at the domestic box office, more than any other studio, reports THR.

It’s unclear who will succeed her, but Pascal’s departure from the role was likely hastened by embarrassing revelations from the Sony hack in December, a massive cybersecurity breach in the company that leaked thousands of documents online. Among the documents exposed by the attack were emails between Pascal and Scott Rudin making racial jokes about Barack Obama.

In a Vanity Fair article on the Sony hack published online Wednesday, writer Mark Seal reported that Pascal “does not act as if she’s going anyplace anytime soon. She is excited to be developing Ghostbusters 3, an all-female version of the 1984 hit comedy, which she feels will become the studio’s first female franchise.”

Read more: Who Is Amy Pascal? Meet the Exec Tangled Up in Sony’s Leaked Emails

TIME Advertising

Death to Adorable Puppies—At Least in Bud Ads

Puppy in a pound
Dan Brandenburg—Getty Images Puppy in a pound

Bud wasn't wrong to move back to marketing beer as beer, no matter what craft purists say

It’s no surprise two beer companies would find themselves in a pissing match. Which is exactly the state of play between MillerCoors and A-B InBev, maker of Budweiser. MillerCoors, as well as the craft beer community, are foaming at the mouth over an advertisement that Bud ran during the Super Bowl.

No, not that one. I mean the advert in which Bud proudly proclaimed its American, mass-market roots, perhaps trying to steal a march from Chrysler’s brilliant “Imported from Detroit” spot of a couple of years ago.

“Budweiser Proudly a Macro Beer,” the ad proclaimed, while the visuals highlighted Bud’s industrial brewing capacity. “It’s not brewed to be fussed over,” it went on. You could feel that slap all the way from Seattle to Williamsburg. According to AdAge, MillerCoors released and tweeted an ad of its own headlined “We believe all beers should be fussed over.” The supposed crybaby craft beer types, being creative of course, responded with wicked parodies of the Bud ad. Good for them, although if you put a glass of Bud in the middle of a dozen craft-brewed lagers, there’s a very good chance the craft aficionados wouldn’t know the difference.

It’s about time that Bud sold beer. Both MillerCoors and Bud have been dropping market share for more than a decade to the microbrew onslaught. That’s why they’ve purchased a couple of craft companies themselves—MillerCoors has Blue Moon Brewing, for instance and A-B In Bev bought Blue Point. MillerCoors is upset because the company still sees itself as part of a beer community that includes the craft brands and doesn’t want to irritate drinkers who are potential customers. Once upon a time, Coors was a cool brand, at least until it went national. The company must still think it is.

In its Super Bowl spot, Bud was trying to reassert its brand’s relevance as a true and acceptable choice for beer drinkers. This is what advertising is supposed to do, isn’t it? Buy us, not them. An ad that’s says “Drink our beer, it’s good enough—and we make a lot of it” makes more sense to me than one of Bud’s other ads. Yeah, that one, the one with the stupid lost puppy that everyone went gaga over.

Bud’s lost puppy ad is unbelievably good if you are selling puppies—and every pet shop owner in America should go out a buy a case of Bud as a thank you—but it’s completely meaningless if you are selling beer.

And Bud and MillerCoors have been having a hard time doing that. Consider the BudLight tagline, The Perfect Beer for Whatever Happens. Whatever does that mean? It means that the product isn’t good enough to sell on its merits so you’ve got to come up with something else to sell. With light beer, it’s always been about partying and sex or humor, because let’s face it there’s really not much taste to sell.

A bottle of Bud is still great on a hot summer day but I personally prefer craft beers—cask conditioned traditional ales, to be exact—to our mass market brews. Once upon a time Budweiser was a craft beer, too. Every beer in America was. Bud just happened to beat up the competition up over time, including Pabst Blue Ribbon, a trendy former mass brew that somehow gets a pass.

Why did Bud become No. 1? In part, because it was a better brew; and in part because it was marketed and distributed better than everyone else. This is a company that helped create the modern advertising industry. So I’m raising a glass to Bud for getting back to basics, to blocking and tackling. Let the craft crowd mock and whine all they want. Bud needs to pour it on now, or risk become completely irrelevant in a decade.

TIME Smartphones

The Surprising Reason Apple Still Relies on Samsung

Inside A Samsung Electronics Co. Digital Store Ahead Of Fourth-Quarter Results
SeongJoon Cho—Bloomberg via Getty Images A visitor walks past the Samsung Electronics Co. logo displayed at the Semiconductor Rider experience at the company's d'light showroom in Seoul, South Korea, on Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.

Try as it might, Apple just can't quit Samsung

Apple will reportedly turn back to Samsung to supply component parts for its next generation of iPhones, reversing previous attempts to reduce its commercial contracts with the rival smartphone maker.

Unnamed sources familiar with the deal told Re/code that Samsung will manufacture the lion’s share of components for Apple’s next generation “A9″ chip. Apple turned to another chipmaker for most of the A8 chips used in the iPhone 6, but industry insiders expect Samsung’s share of Apple’s chips to rise after the South Korean company managed to makes its offerings more compact.

Apple and Samsung have declined to commented on the deal, though Samsung’s president of the semiconductor business predicted a windfall for the company once it begins begins supplying next generation chips to Apple, ZDNet reported last October.

Read more at Re/code.

TIME Social Networking

Twitter Is Pulling Out All the Stops to Wow People Ahead of Earnings

The social network's CEO is doing everything he can to chill everyone out

Twitter is a haven for conversationalists, but it’s been a disappointment to Wall Street. The company lost $175 million in the third quarter of 2014, despite more than doubling its revenue. Some investors have called for the ouster of CEO Dick Costello, blaming him for a lax company culture and tepid user growth. Twitter will announce its full-year earnings on Thursday afternoon (EST), and analysts are forecasting another quarter of losses. If earnings and user growth continue to disappoint, Twitter may come under real pressure.

Hence a flurry of announcements and advancements to Twitter, which may be intended to provide some good news before the bad. In the weeks preceding earnings, the social media company seems to have given its boosters plenty of ammunition to choose from should it need their defending. (Spaghetti, meet Wall.)

In the weeks ahead of Thursday’s earnings announcement, Costello introduced a bevy of shiny new features. Everything power users might have thought was missing from Twitter—group direct messaging, real-time video uploads, a missed tweet function—is being added. But one of the most significant new announcements—and the one most likely to please investors—is Twitter’s plan to sell ads outside of its own platform. The initiative will allow Twitter to profit outside of its core base of users through deals with the likes of news-reading app Flipboard and Internet portal Yahoo Japan. Another savvy deal reported this week will allow Google to access Twitter’s stream of data, allowing tweets to be featured more prominently in Google results and driving traffic to Twitter.

Some new features that have been added or that are still on their way include a feature that allows users to see a selection of tweets that they may have missed “while you were away,” as the heading says. Another feature shows new users an “instant timeline” to get them acclimated to the website more quickly. And in an effort to catch up with more developed messaging apps like WhatsApp and Facebook, Twitter has rolled out group direct messaging.

There’s no doubt that Twitter still holds a broad appeal. But whether all this will convince investors to invest and Internet users to sign up with the service remains to be seen. “I’m in wait-and-see mode because I want to see whether or not and how quickly these product enhancements have an impact,” Anthony DiClemente, an analyst at Nomura, summed it up the Wall Street Journal.

TIME Media

Apple Reportedly Working on New, Cheaper Streaming Service

Apple Launch iTunes Music Store In London
Ian Waldie—Getty Images Steve Jobs, Chief Executive Officer of Apple computers, stands by a projection of the iTunes website as he launches iTunes Music Store in the territories of Great Britain, Germany and France, on June 15, 2004 in London.

Beats Music may be integrated into new service tied to iTunes brand

Apple may be close to finally getting some real mileage out of its $3 billion purchase of Beats. The tech giant is reportedly planning to launch a rebranded music service that offers many of Beats Music’s features but undercuts competitors in price, according to 9to5Mac.

The new service would be part of the default Music app on mobile devices and iTunes on desktops, according to the report. It would make use of Beats-specific features, such as playlists curated by experts and context-sensitive radio stations. Users would be able to stream tracks as well as download them to add to their iTunes library.

Ultimately, none of that sounds too revolutionary compared to what you can do with Spotify or Rdio, but Apple is also reportedly looking to launch the service at a price of $7.99 per month. That would be $2 cheaper than other similar options on the market, which could help spur sales.

Interestingly, 9to5Mac also claims that the new service would be available on Android devices as well as iOS ones. While iTunes has long been popular on desktops, Apple has kept the service off of non-iOS mobile devices to this point. Launching on Android could offer an opportunity for an expanded audience not only for the new streaming service but also for the legacy iTunes Store.

Though Apple has historically been a dominant force in digital music, it’s hardly a given that a new Apple music service will trounce its competitors. iTunes Radio, launched in 2013, aimed to take on Pandora in the realm of the Internet radio, but Pandora has continued to gain users despite Apple’s offering.

MONEY Gas

Gas Prices Spike More Than 20¢ Per Gallon Overnight

The price of gas is displayed in downtown Midland on February 4, 2015 in Midland, Texas.
Spencer Platt—Getty Images

The national average for a gallon of regular is up 10¢ over the past three days, and in some parts of the country, prices jumped more than 20¢ overnight.

What was a slow rebound in gas prices at stations around the U.S. has picked up the pace significantly over the past few days. Last week, the national average bottomed out at $2.03 per gallon, before inching up to $2.05 on Monday, according to AAA. It then spiked up to $2.11 on Wednesday and $2.15 today.

Drivers in certain parts of the country have seen gas prices increase in alarmingly quick fashion, far outpacing the rise in the national average. In central Ohio, for instance, the average price for a gallon of regular was $2.26 on Wednesday, up from $2.04 the day before. As of Thursday, AAA reports that the statewide per-gallon average in Ohio is up to $2.27.

The gas-price tracking service GasBuddy reported that 26 metropolitan areas in the U.S. saw spikes of 15¢ or more per gallon from Tuesday to Wednesday of this week. Michigan has been hit especially hard: Eight out of the nation’s top 15 highest price increases in occurred in the state, including the three largest spikes. Up until last week, Michigan had enjoyed five straight weeks of sub-$2 gas; at last check, the statewide average was $2.28.

Meanwhile, drivers in states where the average has been under $2 for weeks should reacclimate themselves with having to pay more at the pump: The averages in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming have all inched up back to within two or three pennies of the $2 threshold.

Even if prices continue to creep higher in the short term, however, drivers won’t necessarily be subjected to ever-higher prices at the pump in the months ahead. On Wednesday, the Wall Street Journal noted, U.S. oil stockpiles rose unexpectedly to 6.3 million barrels—which is the highest it’s been at this time of year in at least eight decades. When there’s a surplus of oil, wholesale prices drop, and that generally translates to a subsequent drop in retail prices at gas stations.

No one knows for sure where gas prices are heading, but even after the recent spike, drivers in many parts of the country are still paying less than $2 per gallon—an absolute bargain compared to 2011, 2012, and 2013, when the year-long national averages were $3.49 or higher. And most signs indicate that prices won’t be heading back to those kinds of levels anytime soon.

TIME marketing

9 Tips to Make Money on Facebook

Facebook-logo
Robert Galbraith—Reuters

These marketers have increased their clients' profits by as much as 800 percent

Inc. logo

This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article below was originally published at Inc.com.

With a 13-year track record of helping network marketing organizations and small businesses achieve unprecedented growth, Jim Lupkin decided it was time to share his strategies with the world. He turned to best-selling author, Brian Carter. Carter, trusted by brands like NBC, Microsoft, and PrideStaff, has guided businesses to 800 percent profits and higher with Facebook marketing.

After reading Lupkin’s case study on a network marketing company that grew over seventy-million in sales with his approach, Carter knew it was time for the pair to co-author a book. The authors are quick to mention, however, that Network Marketing For Facebook is not valuable to only the network marketing industry. “We were not surprised to hear that sales professionals and entrepreneurs love the book too,” says Carter. “These techniques will work for your business if your personal brand is part of the sales process.”

Why Facebook you may ask? “Wouldn’t it make sense to join the community with the most people?” says Lupkin. “Facebook has more than one billion users and is five times more popular than the next most popular social network.”

Here’s just a taste of what you’ll find inside the cover of Network Marketing For Facebook.

1. Create an appealing Facebook profile.

When someone knows, likes and trusts you, they’re more willing to hear about your business. Your profile gives you this opportunity when you use your profile picture; cover image, and “about” section properly.

Choose a professional profile picture. Use your cover image to give people a snapshot of your personality. A complete “about” section makes you more credible and rounds out your personality.

2. Post publicly on Facebook.

Your goal is to let your friends know what you do for a living and how you can help them. For example, if you’re a realtor:

Hey everybody! As you may know, I love helping people find their dream home. If you know anyone that needs assistance, please message me.

If you’re an insurance rep:

Hey there! As you may know, I love helping families be protected from unforeseen tragedies. If you know anyone that needs life insurance, please message me.

3. Use Facebook Messenger.

It is like email, but better. If you’ve previously conversed with a prospect and you’re getting ready to talk to them again, you can quickly review all your previous talks in one place.

If you haven’t spoken to a friend in a while, make sure to re-establish the relationship first. You don’t want them to feel like you are only reaching out for business. You can say, “Hey! We haven’t spoken in a while. How have you been?” Only chat about your products if they ask what you do.

4. Send messages based on past conversations and what you know about a friend.

A realtor example:

Hey Tom! I know you love houses with a view, and I seem to remember you were looking for a house. Well, check out this amazing lake view property! Do you want to come see it with me?

An insurance rep:

Hey Alicia! I know we’re both family people, and it’s been awesome to see yours grow up on Facebook. I was super glad to find out about this new life insurance option our company just created. It provides for families like no other policy I’ve seen. Do you want to hear more about it?

5. Keep the conversation going.

It’s exciting to have someone respond to your messages! Thank them for the response, give them additional information: pictures, videos and details of your offering, and then let them know what is the next step.

If you don’t hear back, send them a message once a week asking if they wanted to take the next step. Be patient. Not everyone checks Facebook daily.

6. Stay in touch.

It’s only a matter of time until friends want your product. Stay in touch on Facebook by posting quality content and interacting with your friends’ posts. Posting quality content is a balance between business and personal: Too much of either can result inf ailure. Be personal 80% of the time. People do business with those they have the best relationship with; so post about what’s on your mind. Post about business the other 20%.

The more you interact with your friend’s posts, the more your business posts appear in their newsfeed. Your friends will also see you as a true friend, not someone just trying to sell them products. When you comment on a friend’s post, write from the heart. Treat it the same as when you talk face to face.

7. Grow your friends to grow your income.

With over a billion users, Facebook offers an unlimited amount of people to talk to if you take the time to build relationships. Facebook’s Graph Search solves the new prospect obstacle by opening up their entire database to you. All you need to do is take the time to reach out and build relationships.

8. Create a group for support and inspiring sales teams.

Whether you’re a manager motivating a team, or have a group of industry peers who want to support each other, Facebook Groups are the answer. You can move mountains when you belong to a group of passionate people working toward the same goals, supporting each other every day.

Once you start your group, post at least a few times a week. It could be a question, words of motivation, pictures, or videos. Always like and comment on what others are posting as well. Groups are like live events happening 24 hours a day. When run correctly, it will become the cornerstone of your success.

9. Remember, Facebook is part of the strategy, not the whole strategy.

Facebook connects you to new people and helps you develop relationships. However, you still need to talk with people face to face, over the phone, and at events. They also need to experience a “taste” of your offering.

TIME Careers & Workplace

12 Unconventional Tips for Becoming Successful

businessman-mohawk-sunglasses
Getty Images

Because success requires timely out-of-box moves

startupcollective

Question: What is your most unorthodox tip for becoming successful in business?

Sell Joy

“Stop focusing on selling your product or service; instead, focus on the joy your company creates, and let that drive your growth. Scale the joy. Systematize how you deliver the joy. Sell the joy.” — Corey Blake, Round Table Companies

Become an Expert in Something

“If you’re an expert in one aspect of your business, you’ll be able to share your expertise and drive new business because of it. Contribute to publications that reach your target audience, and they’ll come to you for more expertise and assistance.” — Kelsey Meyer, Influence & Co.

Deliver Happiness

“I am a huge fan of the Zappos “delivering happiness” movement. I think that the paradigm for how companies and customers interact is changing in a big way. When I see examples of terrible customer service, it makes me shake my head. Delighting your customers is the fastest way to grow a hugely successful business.” — Patrick Conley, Automation Heroes

Don’t Be Afraid to Fire Customers

“You cannot please everyone, so find the customers who fit your company, and don’t waste your time on customers who don’t.” — Suzanne Smith, Social Impact Architects

Remember Business Is Personal

“Business is personal. This is contrary to every cliché you will hear about leading an organization. But at the end of the day, all you have as a business person in the 21st century is your relationships — not factories, widgets or pipelines.” — Panos Panay, Berklee College of Music

Don’t Work All the Time

“When I was young, I used to pull all-nighters a few times a week and would average only a few hours of sleep a night. Looking back, my life was totally unbalanced. I was far less productive and extremely unhealthy in general. Now, I have dinner with my kids, work out every day, do yoga, maintain a reasonable balance and get way more done than when I “worked” more hours.” — Danny Boice, Speek

Do Things That Don’t Scale

“These are the words of the great Paul Graham, and we have implemented this to great effect at DJZ. At the beginning of a company’s existence, you often have to undergo time-consuming tasks to recruit customers that wouldn’t make sense on a huge scale (e.g., personal thank-you letters to customers or gathering new signups in person). These initial unscalable gestures are what ignite the flywheel.” — Michael Simpson, DJZ

Run a Half Marathon Every Year

“When you’re the founder of a startup, your company is on your mind all the time. In fact, you can run into some major personal issues by not being able to properly “shut off” from business mode. I’ve found that signing up for a major athletic event like a half marathon is a great way to de-stress. It forces you to train every day and focus on something besides your business.” — Eric Bahn, Hustle Con Media

Break Rules

“Sure, rules are great. They create momentary stability and processes we can all adhere to, but breaking them for the right reasons can lead to breakthroughs, unique experiences and stories that build businesses and brands in unimaginable ways.” — Henry Glucroft, Henry’s / Airdrop

Don’t Try to Do It All

“Get out of your own way. It’s easy to get caught up trying to do everything in a business when really you should be focusing on removing yourself as a bottleneck. Entrepreneurs should spend their time building systems and plans for their business and watching things happen. Being CEO doesn’t mean you have to be doing all the work.” — Matt Wilson, Under30Experiences

Say ‘Yes’ More

“Success is rarely, if ever, a straight line. And sometimes, the things that are slightly off track or seem a bit outside the lines are the things that may yield the biggest results. So I recommend you say “yes” to interesting things, people and experiences. Those are usually where the action lies.” — Eric Koester, DCI

Buy a Watch

“My most unorthodox tip for becoming wildly successful in business is buying a watch (any kind!) and actually wearing it (every day!). Being punctual in business is key. No one likes to be held up or waiting on an associate who is running behind. Be early to every meeting, finish meetings on time, and never get caught saying, “I’m sorry, I lost track of the time!”” — Kim Kaupe, ZinePak

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

This article was originally published on StartupCollective.

TIME real estate

These Are the Best States to Grow Old In

senior-couple-holding-hands
Getty Images

The list considered income, health, labor, and environmental indicators to rank Utah at the top

This post is in partnership with 24/7 Wall Street. The article below was originally published on 247WallSt.com.

The U.S. elderly population is growing rapidly. The number of Americans 65 and older grew from 35 million in 2000 to 41.4 million in 2011 and to an estimated 44.7 million in 2013. This trend is expected to continue as members of the baby boomer generation reach retirement age.

While it can be difficult to grow old in some U.S. states, life for seniors is often far worse in many other countries. Still, the United States will face increasingly large challenges. In the coming years, state officials, families, and individuals will need to pay more attention to the needs of the elderly — to improve medical care, access to services, infrastructure, or other amenities increasingly necessary late in life.

HelpAge International evaluates each year the social and economic well-being of elderly country residents in its Global AgeWatch Index. Last year, the United States was among the better places to grow old in the world, at eighth place. However, domestically, each state offers a very different quality of life for its older residents. Based on an independent analysis by 24/7 Wall St., which incorporated a range of income, health, labor, and environmental indicators, Utah is the best state in which to grow old, while Mississippi is the worst.

To be considered among the best states to grow old, senior citizens in the states had to have relatively strong income security, as measured by several indicators. While the national median income among families with a head of household 65 and older was $37,847 in 2013, comparable incomes in eight of the best states to grow old, for example, exceeded $40,000 in 2013. A typical elderly household in Hawaii led the nation in 2013 with a median income of $55,650.

Retirees often have fixed income, as they begin to tap into their savings and collect social security. Kate Bunting, CEO of AgeWatch USA, explained that, “It is really important for older people to have reliable access to a guaranteed income.” More than 90% of Americans 65 and older in the vast majority of all states received social security income in 2013. The average monthly social security benefit of $1,294, however, was likely not enough for many seniors.

As a result, many older Americans relied on non-social security income, such as withdrawals from 401Ks and savings as a supplement. In 2013, 47.9% of Americans 65 and older had such supplemental retirement incomes. More than 50% of older residents in four of the best states to grow old had such incomes. At stake, according to Bunting, is the elderly’s “ability to eat nutritious foods, which impacts their health, and their ability to access other critical services.”

With lower, and often fixed, incomes, elderly Americans are vulnerable financially. In addition, age often brings a host of health problems, causing greater reliance on medical and accessibility services. To determine how the states fare when it comes to health care, we examined health services and outcomes. In the best states, life expectancy was relatively high. In eight of the 10 states, it was at least 80 years.

A good education, which can lead to employment opportunities and higher incomes, is also an indication of well-being. While less than one-quarter of Americans 65 and older had at least a bachelor’s degree as of 2013, at least 28% of seniors in seven of the best states had attained such a level of education. More than 34% of Colorado’s elderly population were college-educated as of 2013, the highest rate nationwide.

As older people tend to be more vulnerable to criminals, the best states to grow old also needed to be relatively safe. In all of the 10 states, the violent crime in 2013 was less than 300 incidents per 100,000 people, all among the lower rates reviewed.

In addition, policies often shape the quality of life for a state’s elderly population. Smart Growth America rated state-level infrastructure policies and their effectiveness in serving all residents, including the elderly. While many states had not passed any such policies, a majority of the best states to grow old had done so in recent years. Bunting suggested that as the aging population grows, it will become increasingly “important that you have the right kinds of policies in place that help support a quality old age.” Adapting to these demographic patterns through age-friendly policy, Bunting continued, is “important and worthwhile to do, no matter what age you are.”

These are the best states to grow old.

10. Massachusetts
> Median household income (65+): $40,020 (15th highest)
> Pct. with a disability (65+): 34.1% (10th lowest)
> Pct. with a bachelor’s degree or higher (65+): 29.2% (7th highest)
> Violent crime rate: 404.0 per 100,000 residents (16th highest)

Based on income, health, labor, and environmental indicators, Massachusetts is the 10th best state to grow old. In particular, Massachusetts’ elderly population has the benefit of an exceptionally strong health care system. In a state where the vast majority of residents were insured in 2013, less than 0.5% of elderly residents aged 65 and over were not, among the lowest rate in the country. Older Massachusetts residents are also relatively well educated. Nearly 30% had at least a bachelor’s degree as of 2013, one of the higher rates. Also, as in a majority of the best states to grow old, Massachusetts’ policies are rated favorably for considering the needs of seniors and other groups that require more services. In particular, state officials introduced a directive that would require all public transportation land use plans to include features necessary to offer greater access for people of all capabilities.

9. Washington
> Median household income (65+): $42,287 (12th highest)
> Pct. with a disability (65+): 37.4% (17th highest)
> Pct. with a bachelor’s degree or higher (65+): 29.8% (5th highest)
> Violent crime rate: 277.9 per 100,000 residents (21st lowest)

Less than 48% of America’s population 65 and older had some form of retirement income, excluding social security benefits. In Washington, nearly 53% of elderly residents had retirement incomes to supplement their social security benefits, one of the highest proportions among all states. In addition to relatively strong income security, seniors living in Washington rated their accessibility to services an 8.9 out of 10, better than how seniors rated their access in all other states. Older Washington residents were also well-educated compared to their peers in other states. Nearly 30% of people 65 and older in Washington had at least a bachelor’s degree as of 2013, one of the highest rates in the country.

8. Connecticut
> Median household income (65+): $44,240 (7th highest)
> Pct. with a disability (65+): 32.1% (2nd lowest)
> Pct. with a bachelor’s degree or higher (65+): 28.3% (11th highest)
> Violent crime rate: 254.5 per 100,000 residents (15th lowest)

Connecticut residents were expected to live nearly 81 years in 2011, the third highest life expectancy in the country. Just 32.1% of older Connecticut residents had a disability as of 2013, nearly the lowest rate. Physical health among older residents likely contributed to longer lives. According to a recent OECD study, Connecticut residents rated their general health a 7.8 out of 10. Also, the median household income among Connecticut elderly residents was more than $44,000, well above the national median of $37,847 in that age group. While the relationship between income and health is hotly debated by experts, high incomes likely allow older residents greater access to services.

For the rest of the list, please go to 24/7WallStreet.com.

TIME Media

Why the Apple TV Rumors Are More Believable This Time

Apple Unveils Video Games For I-Tunes And Two New I-Pod Models
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds announces a device tentatively called iTV as he delivers a keynote address during an Apple media event September 12, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

HBO, CBS and others have cracked pay-TV’s walled garden

Another year, another rumor that Apple is planning to enter the pay-TV business.

This time the report comes from Re/code, which says that the company is in early talks with network owners about launching a new TV service that would be delivered via the Internet. Apple would continue to sell channels in bundles, as they’ve always been sold on regular TV, but it might offer a smaller bundle than the traditional cable TV package.

Media outlets have been speculating about a potential Apple pay-TV service since before the iPad was even around. The most recent iteration of the rumor said that Apple was going to partner with Time Warner Cable on a TV-streaming box. Now Apple is apparently planning to work directly with network owners instead.

There is at least one reason to give more credence to this long-running rumor now than in years past. Before, the idea of media companies allowing live streams of their programming to be watched online (outside of “TV Everywhere” apps that make you prove you’re a cable subscriber) was basically unthinkable. But in the last six months, HBO, CBS and Nickelodeon have announced plans for streaming networks outside the traditional cable bundle, and Sony and Dish Network are offering variants on the traditional bundle distributed via the Web. Now that others have cracked pay-TV’s walled garden, maybe Apple will feel it’s time to smash the wall completely.

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