TIME Parenting

Watch Jennifer Garner Talk About Sex… Education

Jennifer Garner, who stars in the new movie about the perils of the internet Men, Women & Children, has nothing particular against porn. She just doesn’t want her three kids to see it online before she’s had a chance to talk to them about sex. “I really hope my kids don’t run across stuff online that could appear violent to them,” she said in an interview with TIME.

Garner, who admits she takes a pretty disciplined approach to bringing up Violet, 9, Seraphina, 5 and Sam, 2, says she’s done a lot of thinking about how to teach her kids, especially her daughters about sex: she’s attended talks, she’s read books and she’s talked to experts, but says she’s still no quite sure what’s the right approach. Her own mother and father, whom she calls “the best parents in the world,” have still never talked to her about it. “I’m waiting for The Talk, mom, dad,” she jokes in the interview, which TIME subscribers can read here.

Of her kids, Garner says, “I want them to see sex as something joyful, as a gift, as a celebration of love and of their bodies. And I’ve never thought about that before, but it makes me feel really cool and hippie-ish to even think of it that way.”

Elsewhere in the interview Garner says she’s not nearly as connected online as her husband, Ben Affleck, and although she doesn’t want her kids to enter the digital world just yet, he may have other ideas. “It’s definitely a team sport, parenting,” she says.

While Garner says she quickly closes pages that have any mention of her or her family on them, she does sometimes take online courses. She was an active participant in a course run by New York Times writer Nick Kristof when his and his wife Sheryl WuDunn’s book Half the Sky came out. Anonymously, of course.

Because on the Internet, nobody knows you’re a movie star.

TIME College Sports

The Long and Winding Road to Paying College Players

The man who helped win free agency for NFL and NBA players is seeking the same for college athletes

Over the past few months, the movement to pay college players has gained unprecedented momentum. In August, a federal judge ruled that college football and basketball players can earn a share of licensing revenues from the use of their name, image, and likeness. (The NCAA has since appealed the ruling.) An athlete can access these funds, which will be placed in a trust, when he or she has graduated or left the school. Schools can cap the pay, but the minimum cap is $5,000 per year.

This verdict in the so-called “O’Bannon” case – a former UCLA hoops star filed a lawsuit in 2009 after realizing he wasn’t being compensated for his likeness being used in a college basketball video game – came a few days after the NCAA voted to let schools in the Big 5 power conferences – the ACC, Big 10, Big 12, Pac 12 and SEC – have autonomy to write their own rules. These schools are prepared to give all their athletes a stipend that covers the full cost of attendance, which amounts to anywhere from $2,000 to $5,000 above the value of their athletic scholarships.

In March, a regional director for the National Labor Relations Board said that football players from Northwestern University could form a union, since these students act as employees of the school. Northwestern appealed the decision; the NLRB’s national office has yet to rule on the appeal. One just-released paper, to be published in the Hofstra Labor and Employment Law Journal, argues that the players should win.

(MORE: TIME Cover Story — It’s Time To Pay College Athletes)

However, an even bigger threat to the amateur model looms ahead: the lawyer who helped win free agency for NFL and NBA players is seeking the same open market for college athletes. Jeffrey Kessler, a partner at the Winston & Strawn law firm, filed an anti-trust lawsuit in March that could fundamentally alter college sports. The O’Bannon suit was limited to intellectual property rights: could athletes profit from their names, images, and likeness?

“We’re aiming to enjoin the restrictions placed on Division 1 basketball and major college football players from being compensated for their services, given the huge amount of revenue generated from these sports,” says Kessler, one of the top sports labor attorneys in the country. “What will be decided is whether it’s legal to have a rule that schools cannot compensate athletes at all.”

Kessler’s case won’t go to trial until fall of 2015, at the earliest. If he prevails, the courts may force the NCAA to adopt a true pay-for-play system, which the organization has long dreaded. The mechanics of paying players — do you just pay the football and men’s basketball players, and no one else? Should there be any limits? — are daunting. But the O’Bannon ruling sets some strong precedent for Kessler. The judge in that case, Claudia Wilken, may not have torpedoed the college sports model with her ruling. But she seems to invite someone else to do so.

Her opinion condemns the NCAA, and knocks down some of the most common justifications for limiting compensation for athletes to the value of the scholarship. “The evidence … demonstrates that student-athletes are harmed by the price-fixing agreement among FBS football and Division 1 basketball schools,” Wilken writes.

“It is also not clear why paying student-athletes would be any more problematic for campus relations than paying other students who provide services to the university, such as members of the student government or school newspaper,” Wilken writes in another section.

(MORE: College Athletes Need To Unionize, Now)

There’s nothing amateur about college sports. Conferences own their own television networks. Schools switched conferences to capture more revenues. Coaches salaries have skyrocketed: Newsday just reported that the average compensation for coaches in the Football Bowl Subdivision – the top tier of college football schools – is $1.75 million per year. That number has spiked nearly 75% over the past seven years. Athletes deserve their fair share.

Kessler picked the right time to mount a challenge. “There’s a growing recognition from the courts, the public, the fans, and even the schools that the current system is fundamentally unfair,” says Kessler. “We think change is coming.”

 

TIME Civil Rights

Hear Cornel West Recount His First Political Memory

The activist and commentator talks about Dr. Martin Luther King's vision of justice

In new book Black Prophetic Fire, renowned speaker, activist and social commentator Dr. Cornel West discusses the black prophetic tradition.

Working with editor Christa Buschendorf, West discusses six key figures: Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Ella Baker, Malcolm X, Ida B. Wells and Martin Luther King Jr., the latter of whom makes up his first political memory.

In an interview with TIME, West recalled getting to see the Civil Rights icon speak, when West was just 10-years-old. But even though he was so young at the time, West remembers knowing that “this brother was for real when he talked about love. And he knew justice is what love looks like in public.”

West went on to discuss some of King’s later writing, in which he heavily criticized the Vietnam War. “He’s always maladjusted to injustice,” West said.

TIME politics

Cornel West: Obama Administration Is a ‘Drone Presidency’

"I think he's settled for the middle ground rather than the higher ground"

Famed public intellectual Cornel West, whose new book Black Prophetic Fire is a re-examination of key black political figures through a different lens, was initially a big supporter of Barack Obama and appeared with him during his first presidential campaign. But in 2012, West says he didn’t even vote. “I couldn’t vote for a war criminal,” he said, calling Obama’s administration a “drone presidency.”

In an interview with Time for 10 Questions, which can be read here, the always outspoken West said the President lacks courage. “I think he lacks backbone,” he says. “I think he’s settled for the middle ground rather than the higher ground.”

One example of that, he explains, is the way Obama addresses young black men, which West characterizes as “paternalistic,” and very unlike the subservient way he deals with Wall Street. “When you say your major program for black young boys is going to be one of charity and philanthropy but no public policy, no justice, then criticism must be put forward just to be true to the black prophetic tradition,” he said.

The Obama legacy, West says, is contrast to the black leaders in the book, such as Malcolm X, whom West says, “specialized in ‘de-n___izing’ black people”–that is, he clarifies, encouraged them not to “be intimidated, afraid, and so scared of speaking [their] mind and allowing [their] soul to be manifest that [they] defer to the powers that be, especially the white supremacist powers.”

West, who’s no stranger to controversy, is currently a professor at Union Theological Seminary. He’s hoping to draw as many young people as he can to a rally in Ferguson, Missouri, on Oct. 13, to protest the killing of Michael Brown by police there. “It’s a beautiful thing to see the young people in Ferguson and all across the nation, organizing there.”

TIME

Watch Belgian Superstar Stromae Decode His Biggest Music Videos

The European mega-star describes the vision behind his eccentric music videos

What does it take to become one of Europe’s most sought-after artists? Perhaps a mega-single that topped the charts in more than 20 countries. And if that’s not enough, two number one albums, countless awards, a successful clothing line, viral YouTube videos, and a sold out U.S. tour might do the trick.

But Belgian singer and composer Stromae’s international success lies not just in his ability to write clever lyrics and produce catchy beats – his allure also rests on the utter strength of his music videos.

Stromae’s video offerings are laced with metaphors and treated with deep – and sometimes even uncomfortable – imagery. Take, for example, last year’s “Papaoutai,” a song about sons growing up to be just like their fathers. Stromae plays a father whose son wants to interact and do things that fathers and sons do. But Stromae’s character doesn’t move; he’s static, literally like a mannequin. Pretty soon, his son learns to be just like him. “Even if you hate [your father], you will be exactly like him,” Stromae explained to TIME. “But even so, that’s a beautiful thing.” “Papaoutai” now has close to 200 million views on YouTube.

Watch above as Stromae explains the metaphors and imagery in three of his most successful music videos, “Papaoutai,” “Tous Les Memes,” and “Formidable.”

TIME isis

The U.S. Doesn’t Declare War Anymore

Our leaders are increasingly cautious about using the 'w' word

When Franklin D. Roosevelt declared war on Japan after the 1941 Pearl Harbor attacks, it signified the last time the U.S. officially declared war.

Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq: technically, those were not wars. Those conflicts, and other in between, are considered “Extended Military Engagements.” President Obama too has been selective about the way he uses the word “war” in the build-up to today’s situation with the Islamic State in Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS).

Call it whatever you want: “targeted action,” “a systematic campaign,” or a “sustained counter-terrorism strategy” – but don’t call it war.

TIME Crime

Dick Gregory Compares Ferguson to the Civil Rights Movement

St. Louis native and Civil Rights activist Dick Gregory describes the pain coming from the Ferguson community.

Correction appended: Aug. 12, 2014, 12:05 a.m. E.T.

Activist and comedian Dick Gregory was shot in the leg during Los Angeles’ Watts Riots in 1965. Almost 50 years later, he says the anger and frustration felt by the Watts rioters then are the same sentiments felt by the community in Ferguson, Mo., now.

The only thing different this time, Gregory says, is the ability to show the images across the world instantaneously.

“All over America, they’re saying this situation is happening ‘in St. Louis,'” Gregory says. “But people that don’t live in America say, ‘Did you see what’s going on in America?'”

Additional reporting:

Jon Lowenstein
Nicholas Weissman
Jeremy Levine

Correction: The original version of this story misidentified the state Ferguson is in.

TIME Crime

‘If You’re Scared, Go Home': Countdown to Curfew on the Streets of Ferguson

A TIME camera crew stayed with demonstrators and protestors deciding whether to flee or fight, as Ferguson braced for the clock to strike midnight

Governor Jay Nixon set the curfew to begin at midnight. After that, all people out on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri—whether looting, peacefully protesting, or otherwise—would be breaking the law.

TIME stayed on the streets of the St Louis suburb Saturday night, filming locals as they debated whether to go home—as the police urged them to—or to stay and resist the will of the authorities. Throughout the day, legal advocates passed out instructions in case of mass arrest, and community leaders tried to urge protesters to obey the curfew.

But to some present, remaining on the streets after the moratorium fell took on a greater symbolic meaning than simply protesting the death of Mike Brown, the black teenager shot by police a week earlier. It was about not being told what to do; about resisting the might of the state.

Starting at 8:30 p.m. self-appointed ‘peacekeepers’ who wanted to avoid confrontation stopped trying to convince others to follow the curfew, and began filtering out. The vast majority of demonstrators did the same, leaving the streets to small bands of protestors determined not to give in to the demands of law enforcement officials.

At midnight the police began to ready themselves. At 12:30 the confrontation began.

TIME Crime

Echoes of History Resound in Ferguson, Mo. Unrest

Frustration in a St Louis suburb after the shooting of a black teen has led to violence. But the roots of the anger are embedded in the past

The death of black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. has once again raised questions about the use of excessive force by law enforcement.

But on a broader scale, it’s brought back to America’s attention the often fraught relationship between law enforcement and the communities they police – especially when those communities are largely impoverished, and mostly African-American.

A look at the history of race-related unrest in the U.S. — from the 1919 race riots in Chicago to Los Angeles’ infamous Rodney King riots in 1992 — shows that what is playing out on the streets of Ferguson is just the latest chapter in a long and troubled story.

TIME weather

California Is the State of Emergencies

Mudslides, drought, fires and flooding have made the most populous state in the Union a difficult place to live this year

Seven months ago, California’s historic drought prompted governor Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency.

As the farmland-rich Central Valley remained parched, wildfires ravaged Northern and Southern California. Elsewhere in the state, mudslides washed away homes. Then there was a water main break that wasted up to 20 million gallons of water and flooded the UCLA campus.

There’s simply no way around it: California — the most populous state in the Union — is going through some tough times.

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