TIME NFL

Police Say NFL Player Head-Butted Wife

Jonathan Dwyer's booking photo following his arrest for domestic abuse at the Maricopa County Sheriffs Office on Sept. 17, 2014. Maricopa County Sheriffs Office

New details after Jonathan Dwyer was arrested on assault charges

Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer head-butted his wife when she attempted to fight back against his sexual advance, according to a police report published Thursday.

The details, following Dwyer’s arrest on assault charges Wednesday, emerged in a police report published by The Arizona Republic, which said Dwyer violently confronted his wife on two separate occasions. Dwyer denied to police physically assaulting his wife.

He was charged with two counts of assault, among other charges.

The Cardinals deactivated the backup running back after his arrest, which came as the NFL is grappling with criticism over its handling of a series of domestic abuse cases, most notably that of Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, who was suspended indefinitely by the league after video if him punching his then-fiancee unconscious emerged.

Police say Dwyer and his wife were in an argument on July 21 when he tried to kiss her and remove her clothes. She repeatedly told him to stop and, when he continued, bit his lip. Dwyer then head-butted her in the face, fracturing her nose, police said.

When police showed up, called by a witness who could hear the fighting, Dwyer appeared to have left and his wife denied the incident, saying they had been fighting over the phone. Police say she then left with the couple’s son, but returned after receiving a text from Dwyer showing a knife and saying he did not want to live.

Dwyer’s wife later said she did not initially tell police about the incident because Dwyer had threatened to kill himself. According the report, Dwyer later admitted to hiding in the bathroom when the police arrived and sending the picture with the suicide threat.

In a separate incident on July 22, the couple was again in an argument when police say Dwyer punched her in the face and then threw a shoe, which hit their 17-month son in the stomach without injuring him. After she said she would call the police, he threw her cell phone from the second floor.

See the police report below.

TIME States

California Declares a State of Emergency as Wildfires Spread

"It's been an explosive couple of days"

California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency late Wednesday in two northern counties as wildfires spread with explosive speed.

A fire in El Dorado County east of Sacramento more than doubled in size Wednesday night, from 44 square miles to 111 square miles, the Los Angeles Times reports, and was just 5% contained by Thursday morning. A separate fire in the northern Siskiyou County that started late Monday has damaged more than 150 structures, including a churches, and was about 65% contained.

“It’s been an explosive couple of days,” CalFire spokesman Daniel Berlant told the Associated Press. Thousands of firefighters are helping to tackle the blazes, which threaten some 4,000 homes.

Federal aid has been apportioned to cover the cost of fighting the fire that began Monday, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency granted a request Wednesday for additional aid to combat the fire in El Dorado.

[Los Angeles Times]

TIME Television

Watch Jon Stewart Blast the NFL Over Handling of Domestic Abuse Cases

"It's the kind of firm decision-making we've come to expect from people who don't know what the f**k they're doing."

The Daily Show’s Jon Stewart blasted the NFL Wednesday evening for its handling of a series of alleged domestic abuse cases.

The league—which is also grappling with the severe health risks posed to players—is facing at least four separate players’ domestic abuse cases and has come under widespread fire for its inconsistent response to them.

“It’s the kind of firm decision-making we’ve come to expect from people who don’t know what the f*** they’re doing,” he says of the league.

Stewart also relished in the statement from NFL’s official beer sponsor, Anheuser-Busch, chastising the league’s handling of the domestic violence cases.

“How crazy is this? A company that sells alcohol is the moral touchstone of the NFL.”

TIME Television

Darrell Hammond Is Headed Back to SNL As the Voice of the Show

Celebrities Visit SiriusXM Studios - January 23, 2013
Actor Darrell Hammond visits the SiriusXM studios on January 23, 2013 in New York City. Ilya S. Savenok—Getty Images

Live from New York, it's Darrell Hammond

Darrell Hammond, the longest-serving cast member in Saturday Night Live history, is returning to be the voice of the show.

Hammond will take over as the show’s announcer after Don Pardo, the host for all 39 seasons of SNL, died in August at age 96. The show’s 40th season begins Sept. 27.

SNL’s Weekend Update segment confirmed the move—first reported by the New York Times and USA Today—in a tweet:

Hammond, the master of impressions, was a cast member from 1995 until 2009. As host, he won’t be expected to replicate Pardo’s announcer voice, Executive Producer Lorne Michaels told the Times.

“He had the greatest run and he’s a completely beloved figure. So I thought: Don’t turn this into something else. That period ended,” he said. “I think it will be good to have Darrell doing his own separate thing.”

TIME Security

Apple: We Can’t Give Your iPhone Data to the Government

Apple Unveils iPhone 6
Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the new iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California. Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

"We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers."

After dozens of celebrities had their most intimate photos stored on Apple’s iCloud service stolen by hackers and released online, the company used Wednesday’s iOS 8 update launch to defend its concern for privacy and introduce new security measures.

In an open letter posted on Apple’s website, CEO Tim Cook stressed the company’s efforts to keep consumers’ information private and sought to distinguish Apple from how its competitors use personal data.

“A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product,” Cook wrote, referring to how major websites, such as Google and Facebook, use personal information and personal activity online to tailor advertisements to their users. “But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy.”

The statement is particularly pertinent after the Sept. 8 announcement of a smartwatch and new apps on the upcoming iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus that represent Apple’s most significant foray into health tracking and mobile payments.

“Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products. We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers.”

Apple does have a service that tailors ads based on some of what Apple knows about users, but Cook wrote that the service doesn’t pull data from products like Apple’s health apps or the Mail app.

Cook also addressed allegations that the U.S. government has collaborated with major Internet firms to gather data on users, saying Apple has not allowed access to its servers and has “never worked with any government agency from any country” to allow exclusive access to personal information retained by Apple.

Apple also said that iOS 8, the newest iPhone operating system, would automatically encrypt data stored on iPhones and protected by your passcode, making it impossible for even Apple to share that information with the government or law enforcement. That encryption rule, however, doesn’t apply to data stored on Apple’s iCloud storage service.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” said Apple. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”

 

TIME politics

The History Behind the Other ‘United Nations’

united nations - Jan. 19, 1942
From the Jan. 19, 1942, issue of TIME TIME

In 1942, the group known as the United Nations was convened to accomplish one goal: defeat the Axis powers

The United Nations was created in 1942 — but not the United Nations as we know it, the group whose representatives are this week converging in New York City for the 69th General Assembly.

When the phrase first “slipped into the world’s vocabulary,” as TIME wrote, the world was in the midst of war, and the concept of wide-scale international collaboration was fraught. World War II had already exposed the failure of the League of Nations, the international organization set up after the previous world war. Still, in January of 1942, 26 nations, including the U.S., the U.K., Russia and China, signed a pact uniting them in one goal: to defeat the Axis powers. The name, which had been proposed by the Roosevelt administration, became the official title for the Allied powers.

“For the people of the Axis countries that fact could not be other than sobering: 26 nations—count them—26, all determined that Hitler and his tyranny shall be destroyed,” TIME wrote at the time.

Even then there was skepticism that the United Nations could be effective. Some called for a cooperative body to oversee the war effort, while others continued to call for a union of peoples and not just an intergovernmental pact.

But the United Nations prevailed, and when, after the war, world leaders descended on San Francisco for the conference to hash out the details of an intergovernmental organization to jointly confront the world’s problems, they called it the United Nations. The first session of the United Nations General Assembly opened in 1946.

Take a look at TIME’s coverage of the signing of the declaration of the original United Nations in 1942:

The significance of the pact was slower being digested. In Washington, enthusiasts compared it to the Articles of Confederation that had held the 13 States together until the Constitutional Convention. Advocates of Union Now thought it did not go far enough, wanted a union of peoples, rather than of governments. Josephus Daniels recalled his last talk with Woodrow Wilson, when Wilson had said: “The things we have fought for are sure to prevail . . . [and] may come in a better way than we proposed.” Advocates of a revived, strengthened League of Nations hoped the United Nations would prove the better way.

Taken at its face value, the Declaration was impressive. If the signing nations could actually employ their “full resources,” their power would be staggering. Their combined populations came to almost 1,500,000,000 of the world’s 2,145,000,000. They held twice as much of the world’s steel capacity as the Axis, most of its wheat, most of the materials needed for making war or prospering in peace.

Today’s United Nations, by those standards, is even more impressive: instead of 26 member nations, there are 193.

Read the 1942 story about the original United Nations here, in TIME’s archives: The United Nations

TIME astronomy

Strong Solar Flare Headed Toward Earth

Late Summer Flare captured by Solar Dynamics Observatory
A flare erupting on the left side of the sun on August 24, 2014. Solar Dynamics Observatory/ESA/NASA

Traveling at 2.5 million miles per hour

A strong solar flare is barreling toward Earth at 2.5 million miles per hour, but scientists say its worst effects will likely bypass the planet when it expectedly arrives by the weekend.

Solar flares from the sun occur with frequency and, when unleashed toward Earth, can cause so-called solar storms. This particular one is categorized as a low-level X-class flare, the most severe of the three classes.

A storm of this size hasn’t headed toward Earth in several years, Tom Berger, the director of the Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, Colo., told the Associated Press. But, he added, “we’re not scared of this one.”

Earth’s atmosphere largely protects people on the ground from the radiation effects of a solar flare, but such blasts do have the potential to knock out power systems and disrupt satellite communications. Berger told the AP that the one heading toward Earth could slightly disturb some satellite and radio communications.

Storms categorized as “Extreme” have the potential to cause massive damage to electrical and communication systems and even pose a health hazard to passengers and crew in high-flying planes.

Here’s video footage from NASA of the solar flare in the middle of the sun on Wednesday:

TIME celebrities

Barbra Streisand Is Going on The Tonight Show

Celebrity Sightings In Los Angeles - May 26, 2014
Barbra Streisand and James Brolin are seen on May 26, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. GONZALO/Bauer—Griffn/GC Images

Her appearance with Jimmy Fallon on Monday will be her first guest appearance in more than 50 years

Barbra Streisand will join Jimmy Fallon as a guest on The Tonight Show on Monday night.

Fallon announced his upcoming guest on Wednesday; NBC said it will be the film and music icon’s first guest appearance on a late-night talk show in more than 50 years (though she made a quick cameo on The Late Show With David Letterman in 1994, as The Hollywood Reporter noted).

Streisand’s appearance will coincide with the release of her new duets album “Partners” on Sept. 16. The album will feature 12 new duets with the likes of Billy Joel, John Mayer and Michael Bublé. It also promises a “one-of-a-kind virtual duet” with the late Elvis Presley, according to NBC.

TIME South Africa

Judge in Oscar Pistorius Trial Rules Out Murder

Judge may still rule Pistorius guilty of culpable homicide

The judge in the trial of Oscar Pistorius ruled on Thursday that the South African runner was not guilty of murder but delayed handing down a formal verdict, which may still hold him guilty of culpable homicide, likely until Friday.

The verdict will mark the beginning of the end of a globally publicized, six-month-long trial of the feted athlete, who in 2012 became the first double amputee to compete in the Olympics. Pistorius, 27, was charged with murdering his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, on Feb. 14, 2013, after shooting her four times through a bathroom door at his home in Pretoria. He claimed to mistake Steenkamp for a possible intruder, the Associated Press reports, but chief prosecutor Gerrie Nel argued that Pistorius intended to injure her after the two had quarreled.

In the first day of her verdict reading, Judge Thokozile Masipa said prosecutors did not show beyond a reasonable doubt that Pistorius was guilty of premeditated murder. The judge admitted she had doubts about several witness accounts, including those who heard a scream or cry thought to be a woman’s. “None of the witnesses had ever heard the accused cry or scream, let alone when he was anxious,” Masipa said, alluding to a chance it could have been Pistorius’ voice.

But, without issuing a formal verdict, she said “culpable homicide is a competent verdict,” according to the AP. “I am of the view that the accused acted too hastily and with excessive force.”

Culpable homicide with a firearm normally carries a five-year prison sentence in South Africa, the AP adds, though the number of years can vary. And the final verdict may not mean the end of the saga, as Pistorius and the prosecution both retain the right to appeal the decision.

Pistorius, who frequently caused the court to adjourn throughout the trial in order to compose himself and who Masipa described as a “very poor witness” on Thursday, the AP reports, listened while sitting on a bench, at times quietly weeping. He had both legs amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old but began competing in Paralympic events using prosthetic limbs, earning himself the moniker “blade runner.” He proved successful enough to compete in able-bodied events including the 2012 London Olympics, and became an icon for athletes with disabilities.

Steenkamp was a burgeoning star herself who had appeared on the cover of FHM magazine and was slated to take part in an upcoming reality TV travel show.

[AP]

TIME remembrance

WATCH LIVE: NYC Ceremony on 13th Anniversary of 9/11

The ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial Plaza begins at 8:40 a.m.

Hundreds of people gathered at the site of the World Trade Center for a ceremony to remember the 2,983 people killed in the 2001 and 1993 attacks. Family members of the victims have been invited to read names.

A citywide moment of silence will be held at 8:46 a.m., the time the first hijacked plane flew into the North Tower, and at five additional times throughout the morning, marking the time of impact of three other planes and the time the two towers fell.

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