TIME Canada

Watch: Canadian Police Hold News Conference on Ottawa Shooting

Police are holding a news conference Thursday afternoon, a day after a gunman fatally shot Cpl. Nathan Cirillo while he was standing guard at Ottawa’s War Memorial before being gunned down by police.

TIME Switzerland

Swiss Retailer Apologizes for Coffee Creamers Featuring Hitler

Other creamers featured Italian dictator Benito Mussolini

A Swiss retailer apologized Wednesday for selling coffee creamers with the likeness of German dictator Adolf Hitler on the label and acknowledged it had withdrawn roughly 2,000 containers from dozens of cafes.

Migros said that the “unforgivable incident” occurred because of an internal failure. A spokesperson, Tristan Cerf, told the New York Times that an outside company had asked a Migros subsidiary, ELSA, to provide it with 55 varieties of coffee cream containers based on vintage cigar labels. Two types featured Hitler and Italy’s Benito Mussolini, Cerf said: “Usually the labels have pleasant images like trains, landscapes and dogs — nothing polemic that can pose a problem.”

The scandalous creamers were spotted months after a German furniture chain claimed it unintentionally ordered 5,00 coffee mugs with faint portraits of Hitler on them from a trade fair in China.

TIME space

Watch Highlights From This Week’s Solar Eclipse

Watch highlights from the solar eclipse over North America

Much of North America saw a partial solar eclipse Thursday afternoon, barring obstructive rainclouds.

If you weren’t outside, watch the moon cover part of the sun here at TIME.com.

The sun’s dance with the moon was live-streamed from the Slooh Community Observatory beginning at 5 p.m. ET / 2 p.m. PT, hosted by meteorologist Geoff Fox with expert astronomer Bob Berman.

While the next partial solar eclipse is expected on Aug. 21, 2017, there won’t be another one visible across the entire country until 2023.

Read next: Watch the Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse in One GIF

TIME Spain

Surreal Scene of Migrants Atop Spanish Border Fence

A golfer hits a tee shot as African migrants sit atop a border fence during an attempt to cross into Spanish territories between Morocco and Spain's north African enclave of Melilla
A golfer swings as African migrants sit atop a fence during an attempt to cross from Morocco into the Spanish enclave of Melilla on Oct. 22, 2014. José Palazón—Reuters

The fence is often the scene of would-be border-jumpers aiming to reach Europe

Among the top issues this year for European countries along the Mediterranean has been how to handle the flow of migrants from Africa and the Middle East who seek a better life within their borders. Tens of thousands of refugees and migrants journeyed across perilous routes throughout the year, and in thousands of cases met death before land. Others have attempted to cross into one of the two Spanish enclaves, Melilla and Ceuta, that border Morocco.

The latter scene played out again on Oct. 22, and was captured in a picture at the border fence surrounding Melilla that later went viral online. Eleven men are seen sitting atop the fence as a police officer approaches — and as two women play golf below. One is in mid-swing while the other is turned toward the group.

José Palazón, an activist with a migrant-rights group, spotted the men above the golf course and thought it was “a good moment to take a photo that was a bit more symbolic,” he told El Pais. “The photo reflects the situation really well — the differences that exist here and all the ugliness that is happening here.”

Spain’s interior ministry said about 200 people tried to scale the fence that day, according to the Associated Press. About 20 successfully crossed, while another 70 stayed on top of the fence for hours.

TIME North Korea

North Korea Reportedly Barring Foreign Tourists Over Ebola Fears

NKOREA-SKOREA-WAR-ARMISTICE-ANNIVERSARY
In a photo taken on July 24, 2013 a North Korean airport staff member carries umbrellas before an Air Koryo aircraft in Pyongyang. Ed Jones—AFP/Getty Images

It’s not clear if the ban applies to foreign diplomats or business travelers.

North Korea tour operators say the country plans to close its borders to all foreign tourists over fears of Ebola.

North Korean state media indicated that the country was boosting quarantine measures for foreign visitors, according to Reuters, but tour operators like China-based Koryo Tours and Young Pioneer Tours say North Korea is establishing a temporary ban on foreign tourists effective Friday.

It’s not clear if the ban applies to foreign diplomats or business travelers, but the New York Times reports that the Beijing office of North Korea’s state airline said flights to the capital were not canceled.

At least 4,877 people, mostly in Western Africa, have died amid the worst Ebola outbreak on record. While some countries have forbidden travelers from the most affected areas, no country has banned all foreign tourists.

Some 6,000 Western tourists visit North Korea annually, according to NK News, a U.S.-based site that tracks North Korea.

TIME celebrities

Aaron Sorkin Confirms Christian Bale Will Play Steve Jobs

"We needed the best actor on the board in a certain age range and that’s Chris Bale."

Christian Bale didn’t have to audition to win the role of late Apple CEO Steve Jobs in an upcoming biopic, says screenwriter Aaron Sorkin.

“Well, there was a meeting,” Sorkin told Bloomberg Television in an interview confirming that the Dark Knight star will play Jobs. “We needed the best actor on the board in a certain age range and that’s Chris Bale.”

Sorkin, the writer behind television shows like The West Wing and The Newsroom, is adapting Walter Isaacson’s 2011 biography for the big screen, four years after rendering Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, in the film The Social Network.

The Academy Award winning Bale was rumored to have won the role over other possible contenders, including Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and Leonardo Dicaprio, according to The Verge.

But Sorkin confirmed in the interview posted Thursday that Bale will fill the challenging role.

“He has more words to say in this movie than most people have in three movies combined,” Sorkin said. “There isn’t a scene or a frame that he’s not in. So it’s an extremely difficult part and he is gonna crush it.”

Read next: Remembering Steve Jobs, the Man Who Did Almost Everything Right

TIME Secret Service

White House Fence Jumper Charged With Felonies After Kicking Dog

K-9s Hurricane and Jordan were cleared to return to duty after suffering minor bruising.

A man who climbed over the White House fence Wednesday evening was immediately apprehended and charged on multiple felony counts, including charges for assaulting police dogs, the Secret Service said Thursday.

The man, identified as 23-year-old Dominic Adesanya of Maryland, was unarmed. He is charged with two counts of assaulting a police dog and one count of making threats, as well as with four misdemeanor charges for resisting/unlawful entry.

According to the Secret Service, a veterinarian treated two of the agency’s dogs–Hurricane and Jordan–for minor bruising before clearing them for duty.

“Dogs got him,” Secret Service spokesman Edwin Donovan said Wednesday, according to Reuters. The White House was put under lockdown for roughly 90 minutes as a result of the incident, which took place just hours after a gunman shot and killed a Canadian soldier on guard outside Ottawa’s Parliament Hill.

The incident also comes a month after a man jumped the White House fence and got deep inside the building before finally being apprehended in what’s become an embarrassing breach for the Secret Service.

TIME Canada

Canadian Police Say Gunman Was Hoping To Go to Syria

A soldier locks the gates as flowers are placed at a memorial outside the gates of the John Weir Foote Armory, the home of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada in Hamilton, Ontario on Oct. 22, 2014, in memory of Canadian soldier Nathan Cirillo.
A soldier locks the gates as flowers are placed at a memorial outside the gates of the John Weir Foote Armory, the home of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada in Hamilton, Ontario, on Oct. 22, 2014, in memory of Canadian soldier Nathan Cirillo Aaron Lynett—AP

"I think the passport figured prominently in his motives."

The suspected gunman who killed a Canadian soldier in Ottawa and then stormed Parliament before being killed himself Wednesday was waiting for a passport and hoping to travel to Syria, a top police official said Thursday.

At a news conference Thursday afternoon, Royal Canadian Mounted Police Commissioner Bob Paulson said the lone suspect, Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, a Canadian citizen who is reported to be a convert to Islam, was not previously under surveillance by Canadian authorities, but passport authorities had not yet determined whether to issue him a passport.

“I think the passport figured prominently in his motives,” Paulson said. There was no connection between the attack Thursday and an assault on Monday in Quebec, when a man ran over two soldiers, killing one before the assailant was gunned down by police, according to Paulson.

The slain soldier, Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, was shot early Wednesday while on guard at Ottawa’s War Memorial, which stands just steps from Parliament Hill. The gunman then stormed Parliament itself, with shotgun blasts fired just outside the chamber where Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper was speaking to legislators before being hustled out of the building. A Globe and Mail reporter captured the following violent, but not graphic, footage from inside Parliament:

“We will not be intimidated. Canada will never be intimidated,” Harper said in a televised address later Wednesday, adding that the incident will lead to a redoubling of Canada’s efforts to fight terrorism. Canada this month said it would send six jets to join the coalition airstrikes against the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria, or ISIS.

President Barack Obama decried the attack on Wednesday as “outrageous,” telling reporters, “Obviously we’re all shaken by it.” Security was tightened at Arlington National Cemetery outside Washington in light of the Ottawa shooting, the Associated Press reports.

Members of parliament gathered at the National War Memorial Thursday morning and then convened as scheduled on Thursday.

Read next: The Ottawa Attack ‘Changes Everything’ and Hopefully Nothing at All

TIME conflict

The Tragic Nobel Peace Prize Story You’ve Probably Never Heard

Carl Von Ossietzky
German pacifist writer Carl Von Ossietzky, circa 1933 Hulton Archive / Getty Images

This is the story of the "long-ailing, wornout, beaten Nobelman" Carl von Ossietzky

In some years, and this year was no exception, there is no obvious choice for the Nobel Peace Prize. Speculators can guess, pundits can argue, but ultimately the Norwegian committee’s decision — if there is one — comes as a surprise to many.

In 1935, however, the choice seemed obvious. The plight of Carl von Ossietzky, a journalist and socialist activist held in a Nazi concentration camp, had drawn international attention. After serving during the First World War, von Ossietzky became a staunch pacifist and decried German rearmament, facing persecution under successive German governments but refusing to flee despite the threat to his safety. He had been put in a Nazi camp in 1933.

Albert Einstein and French author Romain Rolland were among the period’s celebrity activists who supported Ossietzky’s nomination for the peace prize. Wrote TIME that year:

If ever a man worked, fought & suffered for Peace, it is the sickly little German, Carl von Ossietzky. For nearly a year the Nobel Peace Prize Committee has been swamped with petitions from all shades of Socialists, Liberals and literary folk generally, nominating Carl von Ossietzky for the 1935 Peace Prize. Their slogan: “Send the Peace Prize into the Concentration Camp.”

But the Third Reich was anything but pleased that one of its prisoners might receive the high profile award. The Germans pressured the committee against choosing him, with one Nazi state newspaper warning the Committee “not to provoke the German people by rewarding this traitor to our nation. We hope that the Norwegian Government is sufficiently familiar with the ways of the world to prevent what would be a slap in the face of the German people.” Under this Nazi pushback, the Committee announced it would not award anyone the prize that year–citing violence in Africa and political instability in Asia. “The time seems inappropriate for such a peace gesture,” the Committee said in a statement.

The Committee would redeem itself a year later, retroactively awarding von Ossietzky the 1935 prize, worth $40,000. The move infuriated Hitler. German media called von Ossietzky a “traitor” and the award an “insult” to Germany. The Führer threatened to cut off relations with Norway, even after the Foreign Minister resigned from the Committee over the decision, and declared that Germans would never again be allowed to receive Nobel Prizes. (Several German scientists who were subsequently awarded Nobel Prizes were unable to accept the award until after World War II.)

But by the time the award was announced, von Ossietzky’s health had worsened. The Germans had already moved him from the prison camp to a hospital in Berlin, perhaps aware of the impending international attention that would soon befall him. When they unexpectedly allowed journalists to meet with him, he was “looking thin and sounding tired,” TIME wrote after an interview with him:

But in high spirits, Herr von Ossietzky chirped, ‘I count myself as belonging to a party of sensible Europeans who regard the armaments race as insanity. If the German Government will permit, I will be only too pleased to go to Norway to receive the Prize and in my acceptance speech I will not dig up the past or say anything which might result in discord between Germany and Norway.’

Von Ossietzky was never allowed to accept his prize in Norway, and his tortuous saga continued. Though he was eventually released from prison supervision, it was widely assumed that the release was on the condition that he refrain from activism. In an eerie TIME interview in 1937, von Ossietzky praised the Nazi government and announced that he had been allowed to accept the prize money. But the TIME article also made clear that von Ossietzky’s words were not entirely freely spoken. “Hollow-eyed and pale, Ossietzky knew that if he got himself imprisoned again, it would be his death,” the article noted.

Still, the sickly Nobel Laureate’s troubles continued. A swindler claiming to be a lawyer proposed to collect von Ossietzky’s prize money for him, only to launder the funds and keep them for himself. Almost all of the money was recovered by May of 1938 when von Ossietzky died at 48 of, according to the official death record, meningitis — but by then he was, as TIME wrote, a “long-ailing, wornout, beaten Nobelman.”

Read the 1935 story about the Nobel Peace Prize Committee passing over von Ossietzky: Way of the World

TIME Sarah Palin

Sarah Palin’s Family Won’t Face Charges Over Party Brawl

Willow Palin told police that people were shouting "f--k the Palins" when the fight broke out

Police in Alaska said Thursday that no charges would be filed against members of former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s family over a fight that broke out at a party that they were attending.

A police report released Thursday also shed new light on the brawl, which occurred at the home of Korey Klingenmeyer, where Palin’s husband Todd and children Willow, Track and Bristol had gone to a party Sept. 6.

Bristol Palin told police that Klingenmeyer had shoved her to the ground and insulted her, prompting the fight. Klingenmeyer and several others say that he let Bristol punch him several times before he pushed her back.

The report, which includes multiple statements comprising at times conflicting accounts, indicates that Sarah Palin, the former Vice Presidential candidate, was in the area in the wake of the altercation but does not suggest she was involved.

One officer says in the report that when he arrived on the scene, Palin’s son Track appeared “heavily intoxicated,” had blood around his mouth and was not wearing a shirt. Both parents, Sarah and Todd, were with him, and Sarah encouraged him to speak with the officer.

Willow told a police officer that people were shouting “F–k the Palins” during the altercation.

See the full report here.

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