MONEY buying a home

7 Ways to Get Your Kid Out of Your Basement

College students slacking off and living in parents' basement
Adam Crowley—Getty Images

If your child is one of the 14% of millennials who have moved back in with their parents, here are some tips to nudge him (or her) out the door.

For most of us, leaving the nest was a rite of passage. We went to college, and then proudly headed out into the world to make our own way, while our parents turned our old room into another guest bedroom.

However, for a significant percentage of young adults, that rite of passage is now all about returning to the roost rather than flying solo. According to Gallup research, 14% of millennials (24-to-34-year-olds) have moved back in with their parents. The homeownership rate for those under age 35 was 36.2% in the first quarter of 2014, down from a historical high of 43.1% at the end of 2005, according to Census data. According to numerous economic reports on millennials, this is attributed to a weak job market, high cost of living, significant college debt, and other factors.

These kids, as well as any adult children who have decided to move back in with mom and pop are lovingly referred to as “boomerang kids.” Clearly the analogy is obvious.

For Mom and Dad, who would love to have the ‘kids across the hall’ become the ‘kids across town,’ here are seven pointers you might want to consider:

Start Charging Rent

Cut off the free ride. Yes, it sounds harsh, but you may be doing both you and your kid a favor. Managing money and a monthly budget is something that is not learned in school, and it is certainly not learned hanging out in your parent’s converted attic for free. Give your boomerang kids a real estate reality check. If the free ride comes to a screeching halt and they are paying rent, they will probably want to do it in their own apartment, closer to (or with) their friends, near downtown or a closer drive to their office. Charge rent and enforce it. Once they start getting that first-of-the-month monetary wake up call, it might shock their system enough to have them consider alternative arrangements. If they’re going to have a landlord no matter what, they’re likely to consider a new, more independent situation.

Collect Monthly Payments

Here’s another way to give them a foot out the door – but still a leg up. Start charging them monthly payments now. Let them know that they will have to come up with the monthly equivalent to local rents each month for the next six months. At the end of the six months, you will give them back all the money when they move out. That does three things: You teach them budgeting skills, you incentivize them to move, and you give them a financial helping hand on move-out day.

Be A Strict Landlord

No parties, no loud music, no guests after 10:00 pm. Keep the house rules strict. At some point, your kid is going to want to have a little independence, and some fun too. Living with a strict landlord may just be the incentive he or she needs to find a place of their own.

Set A Deadline…and Stick To It

If you can sense that your boomerang kid is riding out his or her free meal ticket under your roof as long as they can, help them visualize when that ride will end. Create a deadline for them to move out and stick to it, no matter what. It’s likely you never intended to have kids under your roof for more than two decades, so your children need to respect that…and they need to get on with their own lives. Even in a world where millennials are underemployed compared to their Gen X, Y and Baby Boomer counterparts, there are still plenty of ways for them to make a living that enables them to live with a roommate or two or three…elsewhere.

Help Them Get Organized and Overcome The Mental Hurdle

After all the financial aspects are considered, one of the biggest hurdles to making a big move is mental: it just feels overwhelming. So many things to do, buy and organize before it can actually happen. Your child may just need the expertise of someone who’s moved multiple times in their lives to talk them down off the “I’m too overwhelmed and can’t do this” ledge. Map out all the necessities and then make a list of the “nice to haves down the road” so they can see what’s an immediate need, and what can be done over the coming weeks and months.

Gift or Loan Them The Down Payment

Trulia’s latest survey showed that 50% of millennials surveyed plan go to their parents for help with the hefty down payment that’s required to purchase a home in today’s housing market. If you want your adult child up and out of your basement, consider giving them the financial head start now they need to form their own household and be independent.

Buy A Multi-Unit Investment Property

I am a huge proponent of purchasing multiunit properties, such as a duplex or triplex, because they are great investments. In the case of your “failure to launch” millennial, slot them into one of the units of your new property and rent out the others. The rental income is likely to cover much of the costs of ownership, and you’ll have a built-in property manager in the building to keep an eye on things. Plus, your boomerang kid is learning valuable management skills at the same time. It can be an investment property for you, and solve the “son or daughter is still in my basement” problem, all at the same time.

 

More on Financial Independence

4 Ways to Lighten Your Kid’s Debt Load

Is Living with Mom and Dad Starting to Cramp Your Style? Take These Steps to Independence

Taking Five Years to Earn a B.A. is Common—And Costly. Here’s How To Get Out in Four

MONEY buying a home

5 Reasons the Highest Offer Won’t Always Get You the House

140626_REA_5reasons_1
iStock—iStock

Conventional home buying wisdom says that whomever throws the most money at the seller will snag the house. That’s not always true! Here's why.

When it comes to buying a house, the highest priced offer gets the house…right? Not always! Sure, a hefty sum on an offer is the first thing that every seller wants to see, but any good real estate agent will advise their seller that each offer is a sum of its parts.

Here are five reasons why you may just beat that higher offer:

  1. Cash Is King

    If you can buy with all cash, you will likely win out over a higher-priced offer. According to RealtyTrac’s latest data, 43% of all home sales in 2014 have been all-cash deals. Savvy sellers know the benefits of an all-cash buyer: there is no issue involving mortgages and lenders, the escrow closes faster, and there is no appraisal to worry about.

  2. The Next Best Thing: A Pre-Approval Letter

    A pre-approval letter is the confirmation from your mortgage broker or bank that you’re ready to buy in a set price range and have been pre-approved for the loan. In essence, the pre-approval letter turns you into a virtual cash buyer, as mortgages are harder to come by these days. Someone may be offering to pay more, but if they are not pre-approved, you will have the leg up, even at a slightly lower price.

  3. Timeline Flexibility

    Closing is generally 30, 45, 60, or 90 days. Customizing the length to suit the seller’s needs can often seal the deal over a higher priced offer. A seller generally wants a fast closing. If you have all your ducks in a row, you may be able to pull off 30 days. But what if the house they are moving to won’t be ready for 60 days? They’ll need more time. Find out what they need, and then give it to them. I’ve seen many lower offers win using this tactic.

  4. The “Please Let Me Buy Your House” Letter

    I know, I know, you are thinking this is soooo cheesy. However, a friend of mine had three similar offers on the table when he was selling his house. Two of the offers came with very heartfelt letters.

    Related: Wanna Win a Bidding War? Write a Letter That’ll Crush the Competition

    He was actually put off by the buyer who didn’t send a letter because the others did and it made a huge impact—and he sold to one of the letter-writers, even though it was a slightly lower-priced offer than the non-letter writer. Writing a letter may not get you the deal, but if you are the one offer that doesn’t put pen to paper, it could lose it.

  5. Don’t Overload On Contingencies

    Contingencies are negotiating tools that give you an opportunity to walk away without consequence. The most common: the inspection, the financing, and the appraisal. However, every contingency you add makes your offer weaker, because it makes it that much harder to close the deal. Make sure you really need them before building them into your offer.

Here are’s some more details on specific contingencies and how to handle each:

    • Contingent Upon Inspection – I have heard other experts give you the “tip” to forgo the inspection contingency to make your offer more attractive. Here’s my advice: NEVER give up this one. After your inspection, you give the seller your list of problems, current and potential, along with the opportunity to fix them, adjust the price, or give you a credit back. If the seller does not agree to any of your requests, you can walk. You take a huge risk if you waive this. A much better option: offer to do the inspection in the first few days after opening escrow and to give a response to the inspection results within a few days.
    • Contingent Upon Financing – Don’t omit this one either, unless of course you are paying all cash. With most 30-to-45 day closings, you will usually have 17-to-21 days to get your mortgage approval. Having that pre-approval letter will make this finance contingency less of an issue for your seller.
    • Contingent Upon Appraisal – It’s very possible that the house may not appraise for what you have offered to pay. However, if you have done your homework, analyzed the comps of the neighborhood, and are comfortable with the price you have offered, then consider waiving this one. The risk is that you will have to come up with any difference between the appraised value and the negotiated sales price. Waiving this contingency really gives you a leg up over the competition, especially in a hot market where the seller is trying to get top dollar.

More from Trulia:
Style Your Vacation Home With Tips from Homepolish
8 Ways to Screw Up Your Home Sale
International House Hunters Shift to Urban Neighborhoods

Michael Corbett is Trulia‘s real estate and lifestyle expert. He hosts NBC’s EXTRA’s Mansions and Millionaires and has authored three books on real estate, including Before You Buy!

MONEY selling a home

8 Ways to Screw Up Your Home Sale

With the positive momentum in the housing market, more homeowners are ready to put their homes on the market. Don't mess it up.

If you’ve been paying attention to the news headlines, you’ll know that it’s a “sellers’ market” in many cities right now. But beware – just because prices are up and inventory is down and the market seems prime, don’t become overconfident or careless with your own home. There are plenty of ways you could still sabotage your sale:

  1. Selling A House Via “For Sale by Owner” (FSBO). Trying to sell your home by yourself is sheer madness. Many people think that it’s easily doable because the market is hot and you can save on the commission. Despite the lure of not having to pay an agent a commission, you need the expertise and know-how of a professional, who can help you navigate the stacks of paperwork, provide priceless neighborhood knowledge – and negotiate on your behalf. The numbers also don’t lie: the typical FSBO home sold for $174,900, compared to $215,000 for agent-assisted home sales.
  2. Mispricing Your Home. Overpricing your house is a huge money-losing mistake. Yes, the market is hot. But not hot enough that you can push the envelope and price it for way more that the comps will support. Overpricing your home is dangerous – and you can end up burned in this ‘hot market.’ You run the risk that your home will sit on the market for weeks and months and become the stale listing that every home seller wants to avoid. Know the competition and set the right price – never overprice too high in hopes that someone will unknowingly overpay.
  3. Using Lousy Photos. – 90% of all home shoppers start their home search online, and bad photos can tank your home sale. If you let your agent grab a few fast photos of your house on their cell phone on a rainy day and use those for all your online listings, then you’ll likely get passed over for a home with more flattering photos. You also must showcase your house on its ‘best day.’ When the light is shining through the windows, when the countertops and other spaces are clear of clutter and unnecessary items. It astounds me when any home sellers (and their agents) allow photos of rooms scattered with old clothes and filthy, messy kitchens. Every photo should illicit a “wow!”
  4. Refusing to Make Obvious Repairs Prior to Sale. You will lose money if you don’t take care of repairs before the house goes on the market. Showing the house when there are leaking faucets, cracks in the walls, water stains on the celling, and a busted hot water heater are all ways to turn off potential buyers. When you do find a buyer willing to overlook those necessary repairs, they are going to want discounts or credits worth far more than what it would have cost you to make the repair yourself.
  5. Keeping All Your Clutter and Junk. “Oh the house looks fine” you say to your agent. “It’s going to take too long to pack up and get rid of all our extra stuff” you say to your husband. “Buyer’s will see right past all my boxes and collections of plaster cookie jars and shelves overflowing with nick-knacks” you think to yourself. It may sound like a good idea, but it’s not a smart approach. Believe me, I have seen homes come on the market that obviously could have sold so much faster, had the home owners spent just one weekend depersonalizing and removing all their “stuff” inside the home. Clutter makes your home seem smaller, ultimately eating equity and killing deals. Period. De-clutter immediately! Take inventory of all your possessions and think to yourself: should I save it, store it, sell it, or chuck it?
  6. Ignoring the Backyard – Everybody knows that fantastic front curb appeal sells homes, but don’t forget what’s out back. In the summer and fall months, everyone’s attention turns to the outside spaces, where they dream of warm summer nights and outdoor entertaining. If you don’t maximize and capitalize on your backyard, you are missing a huge component of your warm weather living spaces. That back yard patio is not just for storage of old bikes and broken patio furniture that should have been thrown out years ago. In a buyer’s eyes, it can be the most important ‘room’ in the house. You need to stage your backyard and outdoor entertaining areas as beautifully as you would the interior of your home. Green grass, flowers and trimmed trees should be the same standard as your curb-appealed front.
  7. Hiding Problem Issues From the Buyers. I’ve watched too many home sellers pay out big bucks because they didn’t “reveal it all.” Disclose! Disclose! Disclose! Once you have an accepted offer, sellers are required to fill out disclosure statements. If you did renovations to the house without a permit over the years, disclose. If there was a roof leak that damaged the attic two years ago, disclose. If the electrical blows every time you run the dishwasher and the microwave at the same time, disclose. The buyer’s will find out eventually. And if you knowingly have kept things from them, it sets the tone for an ugly and difficult closing. Not to mention that you are setting yourself up for the liability.
  8. Getting Your Ego Involved When Negotiating. Real estate transactions are business deals. Plain and simple. There is no room for ego here. If an offer comes in low, the mistake is to be insulted and not counter back. Always counter back and keep deals in play. Too many sellers take negotiations personally and lose out on creating a win-win deal. Keep your ego out of the equation and put your head back into it. Remember your end goal: getting your house sold and having a smooth and successful closing.

More from Trulia:
Top Reasons Millennials Shouldn’t Buy a Home–Yet
Can Buying an Older Home Ruin Your Marriage?

Michael Corbett is Trulia‘s real estate and lifestyle expert. He hosts NBC’s EXTRA’s Mansions and Millionaires and has authored three books on real estate, including Before You Buy!

MONEY buying a home

Top Reasons Millennials Shouldn’t Buy a Home — Yet

couple standing by outline of house
Martin Barraud—Getty Images/OJO Images

Many millennials want to buy a home. But maybe they shouldn't just yet, says Trulia's consumer expert.

There are many reasons to buy your first home, including dozens of financial benefits and lifestyle benefits. And right now, it’s a buyer’s market; interest rates are still low, hitting 4.34% for a 30 year fixed loan this month. According to the latest Trulia survey, 68% of Millennials are in the market for a home priced at $200,000 or lower. However, home buying is not for everyone. For all the positive aspects to home ownership, there are some very compelling reasons not to buy a home right now. So, if you’re ready to jump headfirst into the ‘American Dream,’ read this first.

More: Why This Millennial Will Send My Son To College Before He Buys a Home

Losing Flexibility

Home ownership provides stability, but that may not always be a good thing when you are in your career-building years. If you are looking for a promotion, an advance, or job change, you may have to relocate to get to that next level. You need to have the ability to move on short notice, maybe even as fast as 30 to 60 days. Having to sell your home quickly could force you to offer it up at a bargain price to snag a buyer, in addition to incurring thousands of dollars of closing costs.

No Room For Baby

Millennials are in the prime years for starting families. You may not have one now, but chances are you may in the near future. So, buying that cozy home or condo perfect for the two of you may not be such a great idea when baby makes three. Afterall, having a baby is stressful enough. Having to sell your house to buy a larger one with a due date looming can be unbearably stressful, costly, and may even put you in the red.

Five Years In

If for any reason you think you may not be able to stay in your home for five to seven years, you should not buy. It will be cheaper to rent. The rule of thumb used to be seven years, but now that the housing market is stabilizing, that timeline has shifted slightly. With only moderate market appreciation, it will generally take five years for you to recoup the costs of buying, selling, and carrying costs. Unfortunately, in the first years of your mortgage, you won’t be building up too much equity. Banks charge a hefty portion of your interest upfront, with very little going to your principal in the first few years.

No Money Down, No House

If you don’t have enough money saved for a down payment, don’t buy a house right now. I am a big proponent of 20% down. That is not always feasible for most Millennials starting out, and it is lot of money to have saved up. But, unfortunately, it is the safest, most conservative approach to home ownership. If you can’t bank on Mom and Dad for a leg up on the down payment, then you need to keep saving.

Too Much Debt

Student loans, car loans, and any other debt you have accumulated are all reasons not to buy a house just yet. You will need to pay down your debt first. Not only will a home purchase put a dent in you debt reduction plan, banks will not be willing to approve you for a loan with a high debt-to-income ratio.

Shaky Job Security

First, purchasing a home with today’s new qualified loan standards requires some consistent job history. When you’re in the early stages of your career, there may be jumps and gaps in your history, so getting the loan is going to be a challenge. Once you own a home, be aware that job situations can change overnight. Losing a job, periods of unemployment, and changes in income are not as easily weathered when you own a home. Your income may change, but your housing costs will remain the same. You won’t be able to quickly downsize, leaving you to sell your home out of financial desperation.

Cash Poor

Home buying often leaves buyers cash poor. After you dip into your savings to come up with the down payment, the closing costs, and any renovation that you need to make prior to moving in could leave your bank account in the double digits. That is not the way you want to start living the ‘American Dream.’ Make sure you will have enough cash leftover to weather a job loss, an unexpected emergency, or even a health issue that could impact your earning power. Bottom line: Don’t end up house rich, cash poor and emergency fundless.

More from Trulia:
9 Things to Look For When Touring An Open House
The Pros and Cons of Buying a Newly Built Home
The 10 Most Costly Home Selling Mistakes – & How To Avoid Them

Michael Corbett is Trulia‘s real estate and lifestyle expert. He hosts NBC’s EXTRA’s Mansions and Millionaires and has authored three books on real estate, including Before You Buy!

MONEY buying a home

Can Buying a Fixer-Upper Ruin Your Marriage?

That beautiful Victorian or mid-century modern home has its charms -- and headaches. (That remodel can even ruin a relationship.) Check out these pros and cons to help you evaluate whether an older home is for you.

Ah…the charm, the detail, the attention to architectural style that you’ll find in a ’20s Craftsman,’40s cottage,’50s postwar,’60s ranch style, ’70s split level, and my personal favorite, the midcentury modern. They each have their own unique elements that add to their charm, and they’re abundant across the United States. Older homes — which are defined as any home or condo that has been “lived in”—constitute the largest category of home sales in the United States.

There are many advantages to purchasing an older home. However, there are some potential hazards to consider before signing up for the house that will need some serious TLC, including the strain it can put on your relationship. In fact, according to a survey by Houzz, 12% of couples admitted to considering a separation or divorce mid-remodel.

But before you decide – let’s look at ALL the pros and cons.

The Pros

  • They’ve got more charm. The older a home is, the more likely it is to have architectural details and decorative elements that give it personality that you rarely find in new construction.
  • There’s more selection. There are more of these homes than in any of the other categories of homes. More to choose from means more opportunities to find what you want, and better bargaining power for the buyer!
  • They’re often less expensive than their new construction counterparts. More often than not, an existing home is more affordable. Some stats even suggest new homes are 20% more than an existing home – and that’s a big price to pay for brand spanking new. In Trulia’s latest survey, just 46% of the people who strongly prefer a new home are actually willing to pay the 20% premium that new homes typically cost.
  • They’re spacious. Many older homes have room for life to happen, since they’re a bit more spacious than today’s cookie-cutter new construction.
  • Some land of your own. An older home usually sits on a larger piece of land. Most new construction sits on a developed sub-division or new community, and often, there’s not much open space in the back or the front of the home.
  • Where everybody knows your name. An older home is usually located in a more developed and established community. I grew up, for example, in the small town of Collingswood, New Jersey. You could walk or ride your bike to the main street with lots of shops and stores.
  • Upgrade and add value. You have the opportunity to add value to your home with renovation.
  • Make it your own. Upgrades allow for a degree of personal satisfaction, and you can tailor the home to your specific taste.

The Cons

  • Press the brakes on that moving van. These homes may not always be move-in ready. Most have varying degrees of repairs, upgrades, and renovations that need to be completed prior to even moving in.
  • Show me the money. Older homes can sometimes require lots of renovations, which, of course, require lots of money.
  • Rather not DIY? To be fair to those of you who aren’t handy, willing to get your hands dirty, or face the demands of fixing up a property, this might not be your best option.
  • Down payment PLUS more. For first-time buyers, dishing out the down payment is enough to break the bank. Coming up with the extra cash to fix up the house to your standards can be extremely difficult.
  • Upkeep can bring you down. As opposed to new construction homes, you will be faced with more maintenance issues sooner than later. Older homes generally have older systems. Heating, air plumbing and electrical, and even the roof may need to be replaced at some point in the near future.
  • A messy predicament. Your house will be messy, and perhaps even unlivable for an uncertain amount of time.
  • What’s the real cost? You never really know how much it will all end up costing. My rule of renovation is that it will always cost you 20% more than you planned.
  • Shut out of an open floor plan. The desirable open floor plan is going to be harder to find, because that home design didn’t come into popularity until the ‘60s, so many older homes have more rooms and less open flow.
  • Going green is going to cost you more green! Older homes may not be as energy efficient as some of the new homes with new, more efferent building materials and appliances that cost less to operate on a monthly and yearly basis.

Thus, trying to navigate the move, significant repairs, renovations, your relationship, and the family, may be a lot to juggle all at once. However, the purchase price savings, the more established neighborhood, and all the wonderful charm of an older home may outweigh all the possible downsides. In the end, it’s up to you to decide!

More from Trulia:
What’s Your Home Buying IQ?
9 Sacrifices You Must Make to Find an Affordable Home
The 10 Most Costly Home Selling Mistakes – & How To Avoid Them

Michael Corbett is Trulia‘s real estate and lifestyle expert. He hosts NBC’s EXTRA’s Mansions and Millionaires and has authored three books on real estate, including Before You Buy!

MONEY buying a home

13 Rules for First-Time Home Buyers

Man and woman embracing in front of house with sold sign
Man and woman embracing in front of house with sold sign Paul Bradbury—Getty Images/OJO Images

Millenials stepping into the home buying arena for the first time grew up in an era of boom-and-bust, insane home price escalation and subprime lending. Here are today's new rules to follow.

Having witnessed the housing market’s wild ups and downs, Millennials may be wondering what new rules apply in this evolving real estate realm. Luckily, the ‘new rules’ can be discovered in the same tried-and-true traditional rules of home buying that were overlooked in years past.

Here are 13 rules for Millennials looking to buy (while avoiding a housing bubble burst):

  1. If you can’t afford it, don’t buy it.
  2. Don’t jump into a home purchase blindly. Do your research, learn about the area, get advice from others, and study all the available data.
  3. No more creative financing: buy properties with traditional 30- or 15-year fixed loans – and know what your mortgage payment will be each month for the entire mortgage term.
  4. Always put 20% down.
  5. Whatever the bank says you can afford, subtract 20%, and you’ll never be house poor.
  6. You’re not just buying a house, you’re buying a neighborhood.
  7. It’s harder to get a mortgage because qualifications are more stringent these days. Keep great financial records, and be patient throughout the process.
  8. Don’t expect the market to bail you out. That means no overpaying for a house you can’t really afford in hopes of market appreciation making up the difference.
  9. Less is more. A smaller, practical, easy-to-maintain house is the new, big, rambling mansion.
  10. Stay on top of your credit, and shoot for an excellent score (above 750).
  11. Plan to stay in your home at least 5 years. Think you’ll need to sell before then? Keep renting until you know you can stay put for a while.
  12. Budget for all the ongoing costs of home ownership – not just the monthly mortgage payment. Be sure you have the funds for property taxes, insurance, maintenance, upkeep, and even an emergency repair fund.
  13. If you are questioning your job security and your ability to get a new job quickly in the event of a layoff – don’t buy yet.

To a generation who saw risking everything and buying homes with zero down as the norm, these rules may seem new. But, as they say, everything that’s old eventually becomes new again. In this new era, Millennials simply need to look back to get ahead and buy safely, sanely, and securely in the current housing market.

More from Trulia:
9 Things to Look For When Touring An Open House
The Pros and Cons of Buying a Newly Built Home
The 10 Most Costly Home Selling Mistakes – & How To Avoid Them

Michael Corbett is Trulia‘s real estate and lifestyle expert. He hosts NBC’s EXTRA’s Mansions and Millionaires and has authored three books on real estate, including Before You Buy!

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