TIME

Robert Capa’s Iconic D-Day Photo of a Soldier in the Surf

Watch the video that shows how the famed photojournalist's negatives were almost lost

Robert Capa in Portsmouth, England on June 6, 1944. David Scherman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

The story behind Robert Capa’s iconic shot of a soldier in the surf at Normandy, one of the most celebrated pictures of the Second World War, is nearly as complex as it is incredible. In 1944, Capa, later a co-founder of the photography collective Magnum, was assigned to cover the Allied invasion of Normandy by LIFE picture editor John G. Morris. Capa, then 30 years old, was one of only 18 American photographers given credentials from the U.S. Armed Forces to cover the preparation for the invasion, and one of only four credentialed to land on the beaches of Normandy alongside American troops.

Dropped nearly 100 yards from the beach during the first wave of the invasion, Capa waded through waist-deep water dodging heavy fire and carrying three cameras. He managed through careful maneuvering to make it to land, where he alternated between taking cover and making pictures as troops made the same deadly journey to shore. In the 90 minutes that he spent on the beach, Capa witnessed men shot, blown up and set on fire all around him.

Huston Riley, circa 1944. Courtesy of Charlotte Riley

At nearly the same time, a young GI, now known to be Huston Riley, disembarked from his landing craft into water over his head — and sank straight to the bottom, weighed down by his gear. Riley activated his flotation device and quickly became a sitting duck for German machine gun fire as he bobbed on the surface. Over the course of 30 minutes, Riley made his way to shore while bullets ricocheted off his shoes and pack. Just as he hit land and began to run, Riley caught four bullets in his right shoulder, two of which stayed lodged in his body. Two men quickly came and helped him reach cover, one of whom, Riley later recalled, had a camera around his neck. The photographer was Capa, and somewhere between the moment when Riley reached the surf and when he was being lifted, wounded, out of the water, Capa made the photo that for generations has defined the chaos and the courage witnessed on D-Day.

The journey of Capa’s film that followed, explained in detail in the video above by Capa’s editor and longtime friend, John G. Morris, was almost equally as perilous. Capa’s film survived only because he carried it off the beach himself. His colleague Bob Landry’s film, along with the film of nine other photographers and cinematographers, was lost, having been handed off to a colonel who dropped the whole pack in the ocean while boarding a transport ship. And although Capa shot approximately 106 frames on the beach, only a handful have survived. Though the exact number of surviving frames is uncertain, the actual negative of the picture known as The Face in the Surf, along with another from the set, was lost sometime after the photo’s publication in the June 19, 1944 issue of LIFE. It is, in a sense, a testament to the incalculable hardship and violence of the Longest Day that the only surviving photographic record of the Omaha Beach landing from the beach itself are nine hard-won, fragile, immensely powerful negatives.

Editor’s note: This video has been updated to include a photo illustration credit.

TIME weather

Two Bolts of Lightning Strike One World Trade Center

Two bolts of lightning hit the antenna on top of One World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan as an ele
Gary Hershorn—Insider Images/Corbis

As a thunderstorm passed over New York City Friday night, photojournalist Gary Hershorn captured two bolts of lightning hitting the spire on top of One World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan.

A seasoned photographer and photo editor, Hershorn described how he captured the photo: “I saw the storm clouds forming while I was shooting some pictures of lower Manhattan from Jersey City right across from One World Trade Center. I was shooting with a point and shoot camera so I raced home and grabbed my real camera and tripod and went to a gazebo next to the Hudson River and shot endless 10 second exposures hoping to catch the bolts of lightning. I shot about 150 pictures and 6 frames had lightning bolts. I missed about 5 others in between frames. I was able to shoot from a covered spot in the pouring rain. It feels like I spend half my life shooting the New York skyline but have been waiting for years to have the perfect electrical storm around sunset…[T]he light in the sky was nicely balanced with the lightning and the brightness of the buildings on the skyline.”

MORE: One World Trade Center: How New York rebuilt the tallest skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere

TIME Style

Decoding Jackie O’s Signature Style

From oversize shades to all white everything, we break down the timeless look of an American icon

Twenty years ago today, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died of cancer at the age of 64. Today, she’s remembered as a wife, mother and graceful figure who championed the arts and literature. But Jackie is also a bonafide fashion icon who inspired millions with her chic wardrobe and effortless style. During her initial year as First Lady, she reportedly spent $45,446 more on her wardrobe than the $100,000 annual salary her husband earned as president (which he donated to charity). Below, a breakdown of the elements that defined Jackie’s signature style.

MORE: Jackie Kennedy in the Early Sixties: Making of an American Icon

  • Pillbox Hats

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy on an official visit to Paris in 1961.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy on an official visit to Paris in 1961. RDA

    Jackie started more than a few trends during her first year in the White House, including popularizing the pillbox hat. Many of her stylish chapeaus, which she often wore in different colors, were designed for her by Halston. She famously wore a pink suit and matching pillbox hat on the day her husband was assassinated.

     

     

  • Oversize Sunglasses

    Jackie Onassis on the streets of New York City on Oct. 7, 1971.
    Jackie Onassis on the streets of New York City on Oct. 7, 1971. Ron Galella—WireImage/Getty Images

    Jackie’s signature shades were both stylish and functional. She has been quoted saying she liked the opportunity they gave her to watch people and that she kept multiple pairs of sunglasses in a basket by her front door.

  • Headscarves

    Jackie Onassis walks through a busy street in Capri, Italy, in the early 1970s.
    Jackie Onassis walks through a busy street in Capri, Italy, in the early 1970s. Hulton Archive—Getty Images

    Jackie had an ability to make even the most casual outfits look chic, and often paired headscarves with giant sunglasses when she was outdoors.

  • Perfectly Styled Hair

    Jackie Kennedy sits in the living room of her Washington, D.C., residence, March 27, 1960 during her husband's campaign.
    Jackie Kennedy sits in the living room of her Washington, D.C., residence, March 27, 1960 during her husband's campaign. AP

    Though her hairstyle evolved over the years, Jackie’s voluminous coif was an integral part of her signature lookl. Her iconic bouffant was created by Kenneth Battelle, the famed hairdresser to the stars who also styled Marilyn Monroe.

  • Elbow Length Gloves

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy attends a luncheon with French President Charles DeGaulle (right) on June 2, 1961 in Washington, D.C.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy attends a luncheon with French President Charles DeGaulle (right) on June 2, 1961 in Washington, D.C. Paul Schutzer—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

    Gloves were another signature accessory for Jackie for both day and night. She favored white elbow length gloves at formal evening events, which were often commissioned by LaCrasia Gloves in New York City’s famed garment district.

  • Strapless Gowns

    U.S. President John Kennedy and First Lady Jackie receive French Minister of Culture Andre Malraux at the White House in Washington, D.C., on May 11, 1962.
    U.S. President John Kennedy and First Lady Jackie receive French Minister of Culture Andre Malraux at the White House in Washington, D.C., on May 11, 1962. Apic/Getty Images

    As First Lady, Jackie frequently wore shoulder-baring gowns to official events that showed off her slim physique — a daring move in the 1960’s.

  • Bows

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy wears a fitted silk apricot dress and triple strand of pearls, walking through crowds at Udaipur during visit to India on March 1, 1962.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy wears a fitted silk apricot dress and triple strand of pearls, walking through crowds at Udaipur during visit to India on March 1, 1962. Art Rickerby—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

    Jackie often accented her famously tiny waist with strategically placed bows.

  • Capes

    U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Inaugural Ball on Jan. 20, 1961 in Washington, D.C.
    U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Inaugural Ball on Jan. 20, 1961 in Washington, D.C. Corbis

    Few people can carry off a cape, so it’s no surprise the dramatic accessory was a part of Jackie’s signature style as First Lady.

  • Amazing Coats

    Jackie Kennedy visits Paris c. the late-1960s.
    Jackie Kennedy visits Paris c. the late-1960s. Michael Ochs Archives—Getty Images

    Long before Olivia Pope rocked every conceivable style of cold-weather cover-up, Jackie dazzled with her seemingly endless array of fabulous, covetable coats.

  • Equestrian-Inspired Style

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Piedmont Foxhounds Races in Upperville, Virginia on March 26, 1961.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Piedmont Foxhounds Races in Upperville, Virginia on March 26, 1961. Bettmann/Corbis

    Having grown up riding horses, Jackie made equestrian garb look effortlessly chic.

  • Matching Offspring

    Jackie Kennedy with John F. Kennedy Jr. on Easter Sunday April 14, 1963, in Palm Beach, Fla.
    Jackie Kennedy with John F. Kennedy Jr. on Easter Sunday April 14, 1963, in Palm Beach, Fla. AP

    Jackie’s fashion sense extended to her children, which meant John and Caroline wore outfits that frequently complemented or matched their mother’s.

  • White on White on White

    From right: U.S. President John F. Kennedy First Lady Jackie Kennedy attend the first America's Cup race on Sept. 9, 1962 in Newport, R.I.
    From right: U.S. President John F. Kennedy First Lady Jackie Kennedy attend the first America's Cup race on Sept. 9, 1962 in Newport, R.I. Courtesy of Kennedy Library Archives/Newsmakers/Getty Images

    Jackie understood the power of the simple monochromatic look, and may have been the originator of the All White Everything look that’s back in fashion.

TIME Photos

Barbara Walters: A Career in Pictures

It’s hard to imagine a world where Barbara Walters isn’t on television. After all, this is a woman who entered the news business (as a segment producer on NBC’s Today Show) in 1962 and has been on the air longer than many of her fans have been alive.

But, as she announced nearly a year ago, the groundbreaking journalist will retire from the small screen today after hosting one last episode of The View.

To celebrate her 50 years in television, we’ve assembled a gallery of images from her long and storied career.

 

 

TIME fashion

5 Met Gala Gowns You Must See From Every Angle

Get a 360-degree look at the some of the night's most fashion-forward dresses

Last night, a bevy of celebrities and fashion insiders walked the red carpet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Costume Institute Gala. This year’s event, which benefitted an exhibition honoring designer Charles James, came with a strict dress code — but that doesn’t mean everyone followed the rules. Below, see some of the most fabulous dresses from every possible angle.

 

 

  • Sarah Jessica Parker

    Sarah Jessica Parker at the 2014 Met Gala in New York City.
    Getty Images (3); Gif by Mia Tramz/TIME

    The actress wore a black and white gown by Oscar de la Renta.

  • Rihanna

    Rihanna at the 2014 Met Gala in New York City.
    Getty Images (3); Gif by Mia Tramz/TIME

    The singer and fashion darling wore a two piece crop-top ensemble by Stella McCartney.

  • Tabitha Simmons

    Tabitha Simmons at the 2014 Met Gala in New York City.
    AP (1), Getty Images (2); Gif by Mia Tramz/TIME

    The stylist and shoe designer wore a blush pink Dolce & Gabbana gown with floral appliqués.

     

  • Bee Shaffer

    Bee Shaffer at the 2014 Met Gala in New York City.
    AP (2), Getty Images (1); Gif by Mia Tramz/TIME

    Shaffer, daughter of Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, wore an ice blue gown by Alexander McQueen.

     

  • Lupita Nyong’o

    Lupita Nyong'o at the 2014 Met Gala in New York City.
    AP (1), Getty Images (2); Gif by Mia Tramz/TIME

    The recent Oscar winner wore a green beaded Prada dress with feather details.

TIME space

Can’t Get Outside? Watch Tonight’s Total Lunar Eclipse Live Here

At 3:07 a.m. E.T. Tuesday, the moon will show the bright red blush of an eclipse, a celestial phenomenon explained by TIME science editor Jeffrey Kluger here. Starting at 2 a.m. E.T., watch live coverage of the celestial event above hosted by Slooh observatory director Paul Cox and Slooh astronomer Bob Berman, who will be reporting live from Prescott Observatory in Prescott, Ariz.

TIME Style

L’Wren Scott’s Best Dresses on the World’s Best Dressed

Celebrity fans included Sarah Jessica Parker, Michelle Obama, Amy Adams, Christina Hendricks, and many more

Venerable fashion designer L’Wren Scott, who was found dead in her New York apartment on Monday, dressed everyone from movie stars to First Ladies, in classic and distinctive styles that worked well on almost all body types. She taught herself to sew during her childhood in Utah, partly because she stood 6 feet tall and couldn’t find any clothes to fit her. Her clothes routinely won spots on Best Dressed lists, which made her a popular pick for first-time red carpet stars.

She even won the approval of the notoriously hard-to-impress Vogue editor Anna Wintour. “L’Wren was a total perfectionist, someone who absolutely embodied everything her marvelous clothes stood for: strength of character combined with a confident and powerful style,” Wintour said in a statement. “In person, L’Wren was always unbelievably generous, gracious, kind, and so much fun. Her old world American manners and charm were from another time, but her sensibility was always fiercely modern. We will all miss her.”

  • Sarah Jessica Parker

    Sarah Jessica Parker wearing L'Wren Scott
    Dave M. Benett—Getty Images for The Serpentine Gallery; Fred Duval—FilmMagic/Getty Images; Steve Granitz—WireImage/Getty Images

    Sarah Jessica Parker knows a thing or two about fashion, and the Sex & The City star regularly wore L’Wren Scott. In 2011, Parker said of Scott, “I think L’Wren has an extraordinary ability to make dresses that genuinely flatter a woman. She makes an unbelievably contemporary dress in a remarkably old-fashioned way for all sorts of women and body types.”

    Parker, a frequent client of Scott’s, notably chose (from left) a gold fringed L’Wren Scott dress at the annual Serpentine Gallery Summer Party in London on June 26, 2013, a hot pink L’Wren Scott mini to the London premier of her film Did You Hear About The Morgans? on Dec. 8, 2009, and a skin tight black L’Wren Scott dress to the MTV Movie Awards on June 1, 2008.

  • Nicole Kidman

    Nicole Kidman wearing L'Wrenn Scott
    Daniele Venturelli—WireImage/Getty Images; Kevin Winter—Getty Images; Gregg DeGuire—WireImage/Getty Images

    A long time friend of Scott’s, Kidman said, “L’Wren and I have been dear friends for years now…She knows what aspects to accentuate in a woman, and is able to make you feel incredibly sexy and sophisticated when you are in one of her exquisite designs.”

    Kidman frequently wore Scott’s designs, most notably (from left) to the Rome Film Festival premiere of Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus in 2006, to the 81st Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles in 2009, and again to the Academy Awards in Hollywood in 2013.

  • Christina Hendricks

    Christina Hendricks in L'Wren Scott
    Jeff Kravitz—FilmMagic/Getty Images; Anthony Harvey—Getty Images

    The Mad Men star has turned to Scott’s designs often and said of the designer, “L’Wren’s clothes make you feel like a sexy pin-up, a sophisticated lady and a rockstar all at once. She designs for how women want to look and for what men want to look at.” Many other fans echoed the point that Scott had a particularly good understanding of how clothes fit the body.

    Hendricks took two memorable turns in L’Wren Scott gowns, first at the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles on Sept. 20, 2009 (left), and more recently at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in West Hollywood, Calif, on March 2, 2014.

  • Michelle Obama

    Michelle Obama wearing L'Wren Scott
    Kevin Lamarque—Reuters/Corbis; J. Scott Applewhite—AP

    One of Scott’s highest profile clients, U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama has become as famous for wearing L’Wren Scott as she is for wearing J. Crew. Obama has been seen wearing Scott’s designs several times during President Obama’s two terms, including a slinky gold dress during an official dinner at the Casa Presidential in San Salvador March 22, 2011 (left) and a pink two-piece ensemble while speaking at the GMA Science Forum meeting in Washington, D.C. on March 16, 2010. Obama also famously insisted on wearing her own raspberry L’Wren Scott dress for a shoot for Harper’s Bazaar in 2010.

  • Allison Williams

    2013 CNN Heroes
    Slaven Vlasic—Getty Images; Gary Gershoff—WireImage/Getty Images

    Girls star Allison Williams has become known for her sophisticated sense of style on the red carpet. She has also become a loyal fan of Scott’s, wearing a graphic red and black dress to the Seventh Annual Women Of Worth Awards on Dec. 6, 2012 in New York City (left) and a skin-tight blue leather sheath to the 2013 CNN Heroes: An All Star Tribute at The American Museum of Natural History on Nov. 19, 2013 in New York City.

  • Angelina Jolie

    From left: Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie at "The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford" premiere at the Ziegfeld Theater Sept. 18, 2007 in New York City.
    Evan Agostini—Getty Images

    In 2012, it was rumored that Jolie wanted Scott to design her wedding dress for her nuptials to partner Brad Pitt. A long-time fan of Scott’s, Jolie chose a classic L’Wren Scott L.B.D. to wear to “The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford” film premiere at the Ziegfeld Theater Sept. 18, 2007 in New York City with Pitt.

  • Carla Bruni-Sarkozy

    France's President wife Carla Bruni Sark
    Ludovic—AFP/Getty Images

    Former French First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy frequently wore L’Wren Scott while her husband was in office, including this perfectly tailored black dress on June 22, 2009 at the Chateau de Versailles outside Paris.

  • Naomi Campbell

    63rd Annual Cannes Film Festival - Cinema Against AIDS - Arrivals
    Mike Marsland—WireImage/Getty Images

    Beloved by actresses and models alike, Scott’s designs have been a favorite of Naomi Campbell’s. She wore a memorable floor length feathered L’Wren Scott gown to amfAR’s Cinema Against AIDS benefit gala at the Hotel du Cap on May 20, 2010 in Antibes, France.

  • Amy Adams

    83rd Annual Academy Awards - Arrivals
    Kevork Djansezian—Getty Images

    Adams chose a L’Wren Scott gown for the 2011 Academy Awards, the year she was nominated for Best Actress her work in The Fighter. The shimmering navy column, paired with Cartier jewels, was one of the most memorable red carpet looks of the event.

  • Penelope Cruz

    83rd Annual Academy Awards - People Magazine Arrivals
    Kevin Mazur—WireImage/Getty Images

    After spending several months out of the spotlight while pregnant, Cruz made a big return to the red carpet in this sparkling red L’Wren Scott gown for the 2011 Academy Awards. Cruz would later choose Scott again that year when she received her star on the Hollywood Walk of fame.

  • Madonna

    Madonna wearing L'Wren Scott
    Ian Gavan—Getty Images; Jon Furniss—WireImage/Getty Images

    In 2009, Scott quit modeling and became a celebrity stylist instead. Madonna was one of Scott’s first clients, and remained loyal to her as Scott became a designer. Madge chose several of Scott’s designs while promoting the film W.E., her directorial debut, choosing a black shift dress for the 68th Venice Film Festival on Sept. 1, 2011 in Venice (left) and a similarly cut patterned dress for the 55th BFI London Film Festival on Oct. 23, 2011.

  • Jessica Paré

    "Schiaparelli And Prada: Impossible Conversations" Costume Institute Gala
    Kevin Mazur—WireImage/Getty Images

    Mad Men star Jessica Paré is a newer devotee of Scott’s, choosing her gowns for key moments in her burgeoning career. Paré made a bold statement (and many best-dressed lists) with a gold floor length L’Wren Scott column for her first Met Gala in 2012.

  • Tina Fey

    70th Annual Golden Globe Awards - Arrivals
    Jason Merritt—Getty Images

    All eyes were on Fey when she hosted her first Golden Globes ceremony in 2013 with Amy Poehler. While Poehler wore several Stella McCartney gowns, Fey favored L’Wren Scott, wearing two of her designs, one stunning black and white sleeveless on the red carpet (pictured) and a deep teal floor length gown later on stage.

  • Kyra Sedgwick

    60th Primetime Emmy Awards - Arrivals
    Steve Granitz—WireImage/Getty Images

    Fashion forward Sedgwick has favored Scott’s designs for her red carpet appearances, and has also attended Scott’s fashion shows with her husband, Kevin Bacon. Sedgwick landed on InStyle’s ‘100 Best Dresses of the Decade’ list with this white and silver L’Wren Scott sheath at the 60th Primetime Emmy Awards on Sept. 21, 2008 in Los Angeles.

TIME Photo

Tiny Beauties: Life’s Smallest Wonders As Seen Through a Microscope

The universe’s wonders are all around us — you just have to look close enough.

Every year, the Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition asks microscope-wielding photographers the world over to send their most magnificent imagery of the magnified world. The result? Beautiful colors, unusual textures and unique patterns visible only under scientific instruments.

This year, more than 2,100 still images and movies were submitted from artists in 71 different countries—the largest field of competing countries in the contest’s 10-year history. The images collected in the above gallery represent the 10 winners, plus 10 more honorable mentions.

TIME Photos

Window on Infinity, Thanksgiving Edition: Pictures From Space

The cosmos are lit up year round, but as the Holiday season begins, they’re offering an especially splashy mix—from a daredevil comet to a box-like supernova to a spectacular portrait of Saturn, with a tiny Earth lurking in the background.

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