TIME royals

Can You Tell the Difference Between a Royal and a Dummy?

See your favorite members of the royal family and their wax dummy duplicates, which were unveiled at Madame Tussauds in New York City on Oct. 23

TIME photography

See Breathtaking Aerial Views of Fall Foliage

Autumn is here, and photographers everywhere are capturing the changing colors of the season. Poland-based photographer Kacper Kowalski captured the most unique views of all, opting to shoot his country’s fall foliage by paraglider (and sometimes gyroplane), creating these magnificent images of the landscape.

“I fly alone as the pilot and photographer,” Kowalski told TIME. “I use a regular reportage camera in my hand. [In this] way I can have control over the image, I can decide by myself where, how and when I will fly to take the image.”

The pictures are part of a larger body of work by Kowalski where he has captured both rural and urban parts of Poland over several years. “I work and live in Gdynia in the northern part of Poland . . . very close to Gdansk at the Baltic sea. The landscape is very rich. And the nature. It is absolutley amazing. Because of the climate in this geographical location it is different each week.”

You can see more of Kowalski’s work and read more about his process here.

TIME space

See the Stunning New Portrait of Mars from India’s MOM Spacecraft

Mars photographed by the ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft on Sept. 30, 2014.
ISRO—AFP/Getty Images Mars photographed by the ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft on Sept. 30, 2014.

India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), which began orbiting the Red Planet on Sept. 23, has already sent back a stunning new portrait of Mars. The image taken Sept. 28 shows the beginnings of a dust storm on the surface of the planet and was taken by the Mars Color Camera aboard the spacecraft. The Mars Orbiter will be collecting images and other data from the planet’s surface and atmosphere using five sensors, four of which have already been switched on.

This data will be shared with NASA, according to an agreement signed on Sept. 30 between the two agencies to collaborate on Mars exploration. NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft entered Mars’s orbit just two days ahead of MOM, and will be able to receive data from Opportunity and Curiosity rovers on the planet’s surface.

TIME

Journey to the Red Planet: MAVEN Approaches Martian Orbit

Ahead of its arrival, take a look back at the spacecraft's evolution

On Sept. 21, NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft will arrive in orbit around Mars and embark on a one-Earth-year long mission to collect data from the planet’s upper atmosphere. MAVEN launched from Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Nov. 18, 2013 and, over the last 10 months, covered a journey of 442 million miles to get where it’s going. The spacecraft is the very first to be dedicated to the study and measurement of Mars’ upper atmosphere.

“The MAVEN science mission focuses on answering questions about where the water that was present on early Mars [went], about where did the carbon dioxide go,” said Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator from the University of Colorado, Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in a statement. “These are important questions for understanding the history of Mars, its climate, and its potential to support at least microbial life.”

MAVEN, which is equipped with a telecommunications package that allows it to relay data from the Curiosity and Opportunity Rovers currently exploring the planet’s surface, is one of several efforts NASA has undertaken to prepare for potential human exploration of Mars.

TIME Egypt

Here’s How to Explore the Pyramids From Your Own Home

New images added to Google Street View include 360-degree views of Egypt

On Tuesday morning, Google unveiled Street View Egypt in Google Maps, the latest step in the tech giant’s quest to image and map the seven wonders of the world. This new collection includes 360-degree views of the Great Pyramids of Giza, the necropolis of Saqqara, the Citadel of Qaitbay, the Cairo Citadel, the Hanging Church and the ancient city of Abu Mena.

GoogleA Street View operations team member wearing a Trekker in Saqqara, Egypt.

Google Street View began in 2007 and has since covered more than 7.2 million unique miles across more than 59 countries, gathering tens of millions of images that cover iconic landmarks and monuments, including the Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat, the Galapagos Islands, Everest Base Camp, the Grand Canyon and the Colosseum. Images are collected using 75-megapixel 360-degree panoramic cameras mounted on Street View Cars, or in the case of Street View Egypt and other hard-to-reach locations, “Trekkers” — backpack-like mounts worn by team members as they walk, hike and climb through a given location.

“We have two kinds of collections,” Google Maps Street View program manager Amita Khattri tells TIME. “We do countries that we have already collected imagery for — we sometimes go ahead and refresh the imagery — and then there are newer countries where we outreach and start on the new image collection.”

The Street View team faced exceptional challenges over the 10 days they spent using the Trekker in Egypt, carrying the heavy rigs through the desert during the height of summer where the heat tested the limits of both the cameras and the team members carrying them.

“It was a unique experience for us as well, because the equipment really got tested in the heat,” Khattri says. The captured scenes collected by the Trekkers were then stitched together into panoramas so that the result is seamless. This process, which also includes blurring of faces and license plates, can take anywhere from a month to several months, depending on the area being captured and the conditions under which the images were made.

TIME Iceland

See Iceland’s Volcano Raging Under the Northern Lights In 1 Amazing Image

The Bardarbunga volcano erupts under the aurora borealis in the Holuhraun lava field in the east highlands of Iceland near Snæfell on Sept. 2, 2014.
Gísli Dúa Hjörleifsson The Bardarbunga volcano erupts under the aurora borealis in the Holuhraun lava field in the east highlands of Iceland near Snæfell on Sept. 2, 2014.

Since the Aug. 31 eruption of Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano, the world has watched in awe as it spews glowing red lava into the desolate landscape. Bardarbunga has stemmed a series of earthquakes through the country, but the eruption has also become the subject of some incredible photographs, videos, and satellite images.

Icelandic photographer Gísli Dúa Hjörleifsson, who is also a ranger in the area, may have captured the most epic images of all: the hot glow of the volcanic eruption underneath cool and ethereal haze of the northern lights, or the aurora borealis.

Gísli Dúa HjörleifssonThe Bardarbunga volcano erupts under the aurora borealis in the Holuhraun lava field in the east highlands of Iceland near Snæfell on Sept. 2, 2014.

“In my many years of working in the highland of Iceland both as a photographer and ranger, I . . . have a knowledge of the nature and especially the way the light has an huge influence in the landscape,” Hjörleifsson told TIME. “Knowing the current situation of the volcano I wanted to capture this unique situation. I drove up in the area surrounding the volcano and watched the the sky until I could see the northern lights taking shape. That interaction with the heat and color from the volcano created a completely new color palette I have never seen [before].”

TIME Travel

See Images of Airplanes at Night Like You’ve Never Seen Them Before

Holiday travel is never easy, but these long exposures are beautiful

This summer, photographer Kevin Kunstadt began making long exposures of airplanes as they flew over the New York City area at night, creating these surreal and eerily beautiful images that chart the flight paths travelers will take this weekend. “A bit of guesswork and luck was involved due to the variability of the flight paths and the time it takes to set up each shot — you can only kind of estimate where the planes might go based on prior flight paths that you might see while framing the shot, ” Kunstadt told TIME. “The website Flightaware.com was tremendously helpful as far as gauging the timing of potential planes, and figuring out when to start an exposure. The exposures themselves were between 3 and 30 minutes.” His images capture light trails usually invisible to the human eye, and a view you are unlikely to see during this weekend’s travel.

TIME photo essay

Night Lights: Breathtaking Photographs of Nature

Takehito Miyatake's photos of magical firefly trails, glowing forests, and the eruptions of the Sakurajima volcano in Japan call to mind a long-forgotten childlike sense of wonder influenced by classical Japanese poetry and natural disasters

At first glance, Takehito Miyatake’s photos of magical firefly trails, glowing forests, and the eruptions of the Sakurajima volcano in Japan call to mind a long-forgotten childlike sense of wonder. However, further consideration of the Japanese photographer’s work reveals his profound reverence for the power of nature and a confident, lyrical use of light that is more often found in painting than in photography. It is no wonder then that two of Miyatake’s foremost influences are waka, a classical form of Japanese poetry, and the devastating Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami of 2011. Waka poems, written in thirty-one syllables, arranged in five lines, of 5/7/5/7/7 syllables respectively, are meant to be a concise expressions of the human heart’s response to nature.

Miyatake considers his work to be similar in form, “snapshots” of the forces that have both shaped and destroyed the country he grew up in. TIME Associate Photo Editor Mia Tramz interviews the 2014 Nikkei National Geographic Photo Grand Prize winner.


Mia Tramz: Can you briefly explain your process in making these photos? How long are your exposures, how do you choose the locations you photograph at?

Takehito Miyatake: There are so many local photographers shooting the Sakurajima explosion. Millions of images are captured. You need to walk a lot, and wait a long time to get the shot. I need to find the spot where I can capture images which nobody has ever taken. The exposure time for the explosion took 15 sec. to two minutes, the firefly shot took three minutes to 30 minutes.

MT: Can you explain what Waka is and how it relates to your work?

TM: Waka is a poem to express the scope of nature [by] using limited words since its birth in the eighth century in Japan. The method has been working beautifully and precisely to express nature with sympathy. I believe Waka is very similar to nature photography. Waka poems describe not only fireflies but a broader sense of the environment, space and even beyond current existence to the world where past friends stay. I wanted to start capturing this broader world like Waka poetry does when I saw fireflies and stars at the same time. I felt some sympathy to [contemporary Waka poet] Utsubo Kubota, who also had very warm memories for his past friend when he saw the mystic light of fireflies and stars.

MT: Is there one piece of Waka poetry that has had the greatest influence on you?

TM: The poetry of Kubota represents what I saw and felt when I took these images. When I photograph, a mystic feeling comes over me. I sometimes admire the mysterious legends that are a part of Japanese folklore that express a fear of nature. I believe Waka also intends to capture this sort of fear of the mystic beauty of nature.


Takehito Miyatake is a Japanese photographer. His work has been published in five photobooks, most recently Living Earth Sakurajima by PIE International.

Mia Tramz is an Associate Photo Editor for TIME.com. Follow her on Twitter @miatramz.


TIME space

45 Years Later: 5 GIFs of NASA’s First Moon Landing

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first two people to land on the lunar surface, while their third crew member, Michael Collins, continued to orbit around the moon. Armstrong and Aldrin arrived in the Lunar Module (LM) Eagle, one of three parts of the Apollo 11 spacecraft which also included a Command Module (CM) Columbia and a Command Service Module (CSM) to support Columbia. Approximately six and half hours after a rocky landing, Armstrong and Aldrin exited the LM and set foot on the moon to begin their Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA), with Armstrong uttering his now famous words, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

In addition to performing several experiments and collecting samples from the lunar surface, the two meticulously photographed every stage of the EVA with specially designed Hasselblad cameras (one of which was actually left on the moon to help lighten the load on the LM as they returned to Columbia).

All of the images taken by Aldrin and Armstrong were scanned and archived, and are available to the public through NASA’s Apollo Lunar Surface Journal. Below, in honor of the 45th anniversary of the moon landing, TIME has assembled 5 GIFs from Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins’ images showing in detail some of the historic moments captured by the Apollo 11 crew.

  • Buzz Aldrin Descends The Lunar Module Ladder

    Buzz Aldrin descends the Lunar Module ladder
    Neil Armstrong—NASA (5); Gif by Mia Tramz for TIME

    Neil Armstrong took two photos of Buzz Aldrin coming out of the hatch of the Lunar Module, and the four more photos as he climbed down the LM’s ladder and hit the foot pad. Aldrin’s ops antenna is visible in the last frame.

  • Buzz Aldrin Makes a Lunar Foot Print

    Buzz Aldrin's foot print on the moon
    Buzz Aldrin—NASA (3); Gif by Mia Tramz for TIME

    In this series of three images, Buzz Aldrin photographs the lunar surface before and after making a foot print on it. He had taken his camera off it its RCU bracket and shot these pictures holding the camera in his gloved hands. This 16mm movie camera mounted in his LM window captured Aldrin on film taking these pictures.

  • Buzz Aldrin Sets Up the EASEP

    Buzz Aldrin sets up the EASEP
    Neil Armstrong—NASA (7); Gif by Mia Tramz for TIME

    In this series of images, Armstrong captures Aldrin setting up the EASEP (Early Apollo Surface Experiments Package). Aldrin has the LRRR (Laser Ranging Retro Reflector) in his right hand, and the seismometer package in his left hand. As of December 2010, the retroreflectors were still being used in conjunction with a dedicated facility at the MacDondald Observatory in Texas.

  • Earthrise Captured from the Command Module

    Earthrise captured from the Command Module
    NASA (8); Gif by Mia Tramz for TIME

    A view of the Earthrise taken from the Command Module Columbia as it was passing over Mare Smythii. Australia is visible at the left on Earth’s surface, just above the lunar horizon.

  • Apollo 11 Lunar Module Rendevous with Command Module

    Apollo 11 Lunar Module Rendevous with Command Module
    Michael Collins—NASA (13); Gif by Mia Tramz for TIME

    This series of images captures the Lunar Module approaching the Command Service Module at rendezvous and was shot handheld by astronaut Michael Collins. Earthrise is visible in the last four frames.

TIME Out There

John Glenn, First American to Orbit the Earth, Turns 93

To say John Glenn was a pioneer would be something of an understatement. The Ohio native, who turns 93 on July 18, was one of the Mercury Seven, the first astronauts NASA ever sent into space

To say John Glenn was a pioneer would be something of an understatement. The Ohio native, who turns 93 on July 18, was one of the Mercury Seven, the first astronauts NASA ever sent into space. Glenn would not only be the first American to orbit the earth, but the fifth person ever in space. He is, like his fellow astronauts, a legend.

One of the most enduring elements of these era-defining space flights, though, are the photographs the astronauts took. Powerful, awe-inspiring images that would be among the first ever taken by humans in space. Suspended above the earth, Glenn and the others — ever the pragmatists — saw a use for these shots: mapping and research.

This picture of the Atlas Mountain range in Morocco was taken during the first orbit of the Friendship 7 flight on February 20, 1962. Since this was the first U.S. manned orbital flight, this was the first landmass picture taken following launch approximately 23 minutes earlier. On this flight I used a 35-mm hand-held camera. Probably the most significant thing about the photograph is that it pointed out to all of us the value pictures from space would have for mapping, weather analysis, etc., in work that has since been refined to a high degree with other equipment on other flights and other projects.

Astronaut John Glenn in a State of Weightlessness During Friends
Kennedy Space Center—NASA

That’s what Glenn wrote in NASA’s 1968 book Exploring Space With a Camera, a beautiful tome in which the astronauts’ photographs are paired with short entries penned by the seven. A book that brought the images to the American public for the first time. Today, in celebration, TIME presents Glenn’s photograph of The Atlas Mountains, taken on the first ever orbit of Friendship 7.

Happy birthday, John Glenn. We salute you.

[MORE: John Glenn: See Rare and Classic Photos From an American Life]


Mia Tramz is an Associate Photo Editor for TIME.com. Follow her on Twitter @miatramz.


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