TIME conflict

This Graphic Shows How Blood Diamonds Arrive in the U.S.

There are many loopholes in the global supply chain

The diamond industry created the Kimberley Process in 2003 to reassure consumers that their gemstones had not been used to finance conflicts.

But while the Kimberley Process removed some conflict diamonds from the market, many still slip through loopholes along the supply chain, as detailed in the TIME article Blood Diamonds. Another problem is that the Kimberley Process’ narrow definition of “conflict diamond” does not include some of the practices in diamond mining and sale that consumers find troubling, including environmental degradation, child labor, worker exploitation and state-sanctioned violence. That allows for unethically sourced gems to end up in stores in the U.S.

This graphic shows how conflict diamonds can easily become part of the global supply chain:

blood.diamond

Read Next: TIME’s Report on Blood Diamonds

TIME feminism

This Graphic Shows Why We Still Need Women’s Equality Day

There's still plenty of room for progress 95 years after women got the right to vote

Wednesday is Women’s Equality Day, which celebrates the 95th anniversary of when American women finally won the right to vote in 1920.

That victory came after decades of activism by suffrage activists like Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott. The 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote, was passed by Congress in 1919, and was ratified by the states in 1920—but not without some drama. By March of 1920, 35 states had approved the 19th amendment, one state shy of the two-thirds needed to pass. Many of the southern states were opposed to women’s suffrage, and the vote came down to Tennessee. Tennessee’s state legislature was divided 48-48 on whether women should be allowed the vote, but that tie was broken by 24-year old lawmaker Harry Burn. He had apparently received a letter from his mother urging him to “be a good boy” and vote for women’s rights.

Ninety-five years later, women are voting more than men but hold political office in much smaller numbers. While women have outstripped men in voting booths since 1980, women still make up just about 20-25% of elected officials at the state and federal level. Check out this graphic to see a more detailed breakdown of how women are represented in politics 95 years after they got the right to vote. Much of the data has been collected by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.

Women.Equality.Day

Read next: The Day Women Went on Strike

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TIME Economy

This Graphic Explains Monday’s Stock-Market Crash

How a slowdown in China can take money out of your pocket

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted more than 1,000 points Monday morning, taking millions of Americans’ 401(k) plans down with it. While stocks regained some of their lost ground by Monday afternoon, continued uncertainty over factors as far-ranging as China’s economy to global commodity prices could continue to wreak havoc on the markets for the rest of the week and beyond.

How can an economic slowdown in China take money out of your pocket? Check out the TIME infographic below to learn more:

Dow-drop-online

 

TIME Sex/Relationships

See How ‘Female Viagra’ Works

This graphic explains the newly-approved drug

The first drug to treat a lack of female sexual desire has been approved by federal authorities.

The drug flibanserin, which has been coined ‘female Viagra,’ is intended to treat women with a condition called hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) that’s characterized by lagging libido. On Tuesday, the drug was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “Today’s approval provides women distressed by their low sexual desire with an approved treatment option,” Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement.

Although the drug is being called a “Viagra” for women, it actually works quite differently. You can see how below.

Female Viagra
Heather Jones for TIME

Read next: What 8 Medical Experts Think About ‘Female Viagra’

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TIME Mental Health/Psychology

This Graphic Shows What Stress Does to Your Body

Americans need to relax.

Over 40% of people in the U.S. say they are not doing enough to manage their stress, and the consequences of that could lead to all sorts of health-related problems. A recent study published in the journal Neuron showed people who are stressed have more difficulty with self-control and are more likely to choose to eat unhealthy food. If you’re like many Americans, you often be stressed about work and money, but there are good reasons to take time out of your day to relax. Here’s some examples of how stress affects your entire body.

Heather Jones

Read next: How To Calm Your Monkey Mind and Get Things Done

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TIME Environment

This Graphic Shows How Plastic Balls Are Saving L.A. From Drought

Why reservoirs across the city have thousands of 'shade balls' floating on the surface

The city of Los Angeles has dumped millions of small black balls into the city’s reservoirs in an effort to protect the city’s water supply.

The “shade balls” are intended to maintain good water quality and protect against evaporation. It’s one solution to the state of California’s record-breaking drought, and could save the city millions in both water and costs. “As the drought continues, it has never been more important to focus on innovative ways to maintain the highest quality drinking water for our 4 million residents, Los Angeles City Council Mitchell Englander said in a statement.

But how do they work? Take a look at the graphic below and find out:

shade.balls
TIME Economy

Here’s What China’s Currency Devaluation Really Means

Everything you need to know in 1 graphic

In a surprise move, China announced this week devalued its currency, the yuan, relative to the dollar.

The move, done by adding supply of yuan to the global marketplace, is a step towards giving market forces more influence over China’s tightly-controlled currency. It will help Chinese businesses who do business in foreign countries like the United States by making their goods less expensive here. And a more free-floating yuan is also more likely to gain the elite status of global reserve currency, a goal Beijing badly wants to achieve.

Read more: Here’s why China devalued its currency

But it’s unclear exactly how much control China is willing to cede over its currency. That uncertainty is taking a toll on global stock markets this week, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropping more than 200 points Tuesday before partially recovering Wednesday.

For more on China’s currency devaluation and what it means, see TIME’s infographic below:

TIME Sports

It’s Much Harder to Get a Ticker-Tape Parade Than It Used to Be

This chart shows one more reason why the celebration for the Women's World Cup team is a true honor

When the U.S. women’s soccer team is honored on Friday with a ticker-tape parade in New York City, to celebrate their World Cup victory, it will be the first such parade in more than three years, and only the fifth of the 2000s. For the city to pull out all the stops is rare these days, so it’s that much more of a big deal.

But, as the chart below shows, it used to be that ticker-tape parades happened practically all the time. In 1953 alone, there were 11 parades, honoring everyone from the King and Queen of Greece to, in honor of the 150th anniversary of City Hall, employees of New York City. Here’s how the frequency of ticker-tape parades has changed over the years:

tickertape

Read more: A Brief History of Ticker-Tape Parades

TIME Greece

This Graphic Shows What Greek Austerity Would Look Like in the U.S.

Here's how similar cuts would affect the average American

Over the past few years, Greece has struggled to stay financially afloat, relying on bailout packages since 2010 from the European Union, the International Monetary Fund and the European Central Bank to prevent total economic collapse. The rescue funds provided to the beleaguered Mediterranean country came with strict requirements: Greece had to impose harsh spending cuts, raise taxes and lay off public sector employees. These steep cost-cutting, or austerity, measures have become increasingly controversial.

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has repeatedly blamed the “austerity experiment” for the country’s skyrocketing unemployment and poverty levels.“This has exhausted the patience and resilience of the Greek people,” he told the European Parliament in Strasbourg on Wednesday.

To put those austerity measures implemented by Greece since 2010 in perspective, here’s how similar cuts would impact the U.S. Read more about that here.

TIME Food & Drink

This Graphic Shows How Many Hot Dogs It Takes to Win the Nathan’s Eating Contest

Nathan's Hotdogs
George Heyer—Getty Images Crowds outside Nathan's Famous hot dog stand on Coney Island, New York City, circa 1955

They scarf down a lot more than they used to

According to Nathan’s Famous lore, the first Fourth of July hot-dog-eating contest took place the very year the hot dog stand on New York’s Coney Island opened in 1916. The story goes that it began when four immigrants were trying to determine who was the most patriotic by scarfing the dogs. But there’s no proof that there was an organized contest until the 1970s– as the press agent Mortimer Matz told the New York Times and Nathan’s then acknowledged. So our tally of how many hot dogs it took to win the contest begins in 1972, when Nathan’s started keeping records. That year’s winner, Jason Schechter, ate 14 wieners—a number that’s puny by today’s standards. Current record-holder Joey Chestnut won his title by noshing a whopping 69 in 2013.

For your awe-filled—or vomit-tinged—enjoyment, scroll down to see how many frankfurters have been consumed by the winners of every Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest between 1972 and 2014. As for why the thing is at Nathan’s at all, here’s how TIME explained the importance of Nathan Handwerker’s beachside joint in 1960:

The spiritual home of the U.S. hot dog —and the world’s largest hot dog stand—is Nathan‘s Famous on Brooklyn’s Coney Island. To Nathan‘s gaudy green and white stands each summer flock many of the millions of visitors to Coney, gobbling up more than 200,000 hot dogs (at 20¢ each) on a weekend. Summer or winter, Nathan‘s never closes. Its customers have braved blizzards just to reach a Nathan‘s hot dog: it is a regular last stop for many early-morning survivors of Manhattan’s cafe society.

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