TIME College Basketball

Here’s Your Printable 2015 NCAA Tournament Bracket

Which four teams will make it to Indianapolis on April 4?

The committee has spoken and the full 2015 NCAA Tournament bracket has been set. Duke, Kentucky, Villanova and Wisconsin are the No.1 seeds in each region. The Big 12 and Big Ten each placed seven teams in the bracket. But which teams will make it to the Final Four in Indianapolis on April 4?

Here’s a printable bracket that you can fill in, courtesy of Sports Illustrated.

For more news and analysis on one of the biggest college tournaments in the sporting calendar, click here.

Read next: 6 Ways to Win Your March Madness Office Pool

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME United Kingdom

Witness This British Politician Crash and Burn in a Live Interview

Britain's Green Party leader Natalie Bennett speaks during the party's general election campaign launch in central London
Stefan Wermuth—Reuters Britain's Green Party leader Natalie Bennett speaks during the party's general election campaign launch in London on Feb. 24, 2015.

Later apologized for suffering a "mind blank"

A warning for anyone with a crippling fear of freezing up while public speaking or being interviewed: This gets awkward.

U.K. Green Party leader Natalie Bennett appeared on a London radio station Tuesday to unveil her party’s manifesto ahead of the country’s general election in May. Although the Green Party currently exists on the margins of national politics in the U.K., with just one elected member of parliament, it has big proposals to introduce a universal welfare payment or “citizen’s income” of 72 pounds ($111) a week, and to build 500,000 public housing units.

The problem came when the interviewer, Nick Ferrari of London broadcaster LBC, asked how her party proposed to pay for all those new homes. Her answer—that it would remove tax breaks for private landlords—did not satisfy her interlocutor, who pressed the question as British interviewers tend to do. And that’s when things began to get excruciating:

Ferrari: The cost of 500,000 homes, let’s start with that. How much would that be?

Bennett: “Right, well, that’s, erm… you’ve got a total cost… erm… that we’re… that will be spelt out in our manifesto.

Ferrari: So you don’t know?

Bennett: No, well, err.

Ferrari: You don’t, ok. So you don’t know how much those homes are going to cost, but the way it’s going to be funded is mortgage relief from private landlords. How much is that worth?

Bennett: Right, well what we’re looking at with the figures here. Erm, what we need to do is actually… uh……… we’re looking at a total spend of £2.7… billion.

Ferrari: 500,000 homes, £2.7billion? What are they made of, plywood?

Bennett later apologized for suffering a “mind blank” during the LBC interview. “I am very happy to confess that and I am very sorry to the Green Party members who I did not do a very good job representing our policies on,” she said. “That happens, I am human.”

Listen to the entire interview here:

 

TIME Television

Watch Jon Stewart’s First Episode of The Daily Show

Over 16 years ago

When Jon Stewart took over The Daily Show from host Craig Kilborn in January 1999, few could have foreseen how long a run he would have in the host’s chair — or how influential the show would end up being under Stewart’s reign.

Now, just over 16 years later, Stewart announced Tuesday he would be leaving the show at the end of 2015.

Here’s a quick look at a youthful Stewart’s first day on the job, interviewing Michael J. Fox before bits on Strom Thurmond and the NBA lock-out. (Yep, it was the ’90s.)

“Is this live by the way?” Fox asks at one point.

“It’s my first day, I don’t know,” Stewart responds. “It could be.”

See the full clip above.

Read next: 7 Potential Replacements for Jon Stewart on The Daily Show

TIME weather

Winter Storm Will Make It a White Groundhog Day

Here we go again

Groundhog Day is going to seem very familiar to many folks in the Midwest and Northeast, as another winter storm crosses the country over the weekend, just days after a historic blizzard.

Snow is expected to hit parts of the Midwest late Saturday, the Weather Channel reports, with several inches forecast from Nebraska and South Dakota to western Pennyslvania on Sunday.

Then early on Monday morning—Groundhog Day—the snow will move eastwards to the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, with snow accumulating in New York City and in Boston, where a severe storm covered the city in up to two feet of snow earlier this week.

Totals are currently forecast to be between eight and twelve inches of snow in Chicago, Detroit, and New York City, with more in Boston. Although, as many learned last week, early forecasts aren’t always accurate.

But no one should be surprised if Punxsutawney Phil predicts six more weeks of winter.

[Weather Channel]

TIME Saudi Arabia

Who Is Saudi Arabia’s New King?

Meet King Salman

King Salman is now ruler of Saudi Arabia after his elder half-brother, King Abdullah, died early Friday at age 90.

Salman bin Abdulaziz, who was named crown prince in June 2012, was Abdullah’s third heir to the throne after two elder brothers died in late 2011 and mid-2012. As the new King of Saudi Arabia, home to 28 million people, he will also serve as Prime Minister and Defense Minister.

A longtime governor of the capital, Riyadh, Salman has a reputation as a progressive and practical prince similar in bearing to his late brother. The transition is expected to be a smooth one, with little instability and no long-term policy changes. But the 79-year-old has reportedly been in poor health in recent years, and is perhaps unlikely to rule for as long as his elder sibling.

Unlike European monarchies that are handed down by generations, the Saudi throne has passed between the sons of King Abdulaziz, who founded modern-day Saudi Arabia in 1932. His sons Saud, Faisal, Khalid and Fahd each became king in the 20th century; Abdullah took the throne when Fahd died in 2005.

King Salman’s crown prince will be his younger brother Prince Muqrin, the youngest surviving son of King Abdulaziz, who was named deputy crown prince last year when the kingdom acted to set in stone its structure for the future. Muqrin is said, like the new King, to be committed to cautious reforms.

It was decreed by the King in 2006 that when the last of Abdulaziz’s sons passes away, a new King will be chosen from among his grandsons by a council of senior Saudi princes. Prince Muhammad bin Nayef, the son of a crown prince who died, is considered a leading contender after being appointed Interior Minister in 2012.

But the kingdom has never transitioned from one generation to another, and no one quite knows what will happen when it does.

Read next: King Abdullah’s ‘Special Relationship’ With the U.S.

TIME celebrities

Kanye Says Don’t Be a Monster, Go Vote

"The midterms are extremely important"

Kanye West made a last-minute plea to Americans to get out and vote Tuesday, in a brief flurry of tweets just hours before polls closed.

First, the rapper told his 10.9 million followers that he and wife Kim Kardashian had met President Obama two weeks ago—a man who famously once called him a “jackass“—and said he had decided he would be “supporting the Democratic ticket in these midterms.”

The elections, he added, were “extremely important” — a statement with which few Americans agree, if polls are to be believed. Only 41 percent in the U.S. have given much thought to the midterms at all, according to Gallup.

Kanye concluded his series of tweets by urging fans to exercise their democratic rights before the polls close:

Meanwhile, as the “Yeezus” artist was making his hasty appeal to voters on the Internet, fellow rap star Lil Jon had already flown all the way from Los Angeles to Georgia to cast a vote in the contentious senate race there, ABC News reported. Earlier this year, Lil Jon also turned his hit song “Turn Down for What” into a Rock the Vote ad called “Turn Out for What.”

TIME fashion

How Justin Bieber Killed the Mustache

The pop icon's attempt at ironic facial furniture might be the end of the humble lip warmer

RIP, the mustache. Justin Bieber’s decision to sport one in public this week might represent the final nail in the coffin for a facial feature that had already gone from being a symbol of manliness to an ironic punchline. After all, what self-respecting Brooklyn poseur can be proud to comb his lip caterpillar now that the Biebs has one?

The pop icon appeared at Paris Fashion Week Wednesday with a wispy dusting of facial frizz atop his lip. He had previously experimented with one at various points in recent months, but it now seems to have gone beyond overgrown bum fluff to an actual grooming choice. No doubt intended to be a hipsterish affectation, the mustache instead made him look like a ripe pubescent whose father hasn’t bought him a razor yet.

But the fact that the nation’s premier former teen idol apparently thinks it giddily ironic to wear a mustache in public vividly illustrates the decline of a male style choice once proudly sported by film stars, political gods and war heroes.

The early 20th century was the mustache’s prime era, when mustachioed leading men like Errol Flynn and Clark Gable ruled Hollywood, and Teddy Roosevelt could be among the manliest of presidents with a veritable slab of hair resting beneath his nose. It was fashionable for U.S. airmen to wear “bulletproof mustaches” as a superstition in WWII and Vietnam — but none was more impervious to attack than that of “triple ace” Robin Olds, whose non-regulation ‘stache became nothing less than a symbol of rebellion. It was, he said, “ the middle finger I couldn’t raise in the PR photographs. The mustache became my silent last word in the verbal battles…with higher headquarters on rules, targets, and fighting the war.”

The mustache as symbol underwent a kind of metamorphosis in the 1970s, however, when it became a signifier of gay culture and, eventually, of pornography. Although it was arguably the mustache’s masculine potency that attracted it to these subcultures, its association with them watered down its appeal to the mainstream. It had something of a resurgence in the 1980s, thanks to the heroic efforts of Tom Selleck and Burt Reynolds, but almost disappeared from popular visibility towards the end of the century, when goatees and sideburns became more en vogue.

By the early 21st century, the mustache had become little more than a costume accessory to most of America — whether they’re dressing as a porn star, as Saddam Hussein, or as Ron Burgundy. The lingering porniness of the ‘stache has also cemented it as the facial furniture of choice of the stereotypical creepy uncle or teacher.

This wane in popularity is a development some have linked to a general decline in American maleness. Here’s Wesley Morris, writing in the Boston Globe in 2009, on how the newly sensitive men of the 2000s, “afraid of seeming too serious about being male,” relegated the mustache to the vintage store bargain bin:

“To be a guy became a kind of adolescent joke – think Jackass and the G4 network – and to be a man, a grownup, meant shaving your upper lip, and possibly maintaining your eyebrows. There are more college-educated American men now that there have ever been, and while education can create self-confidence, it’s also good at creating self-consciousness. You could say that a huge swath of American men have simply misplaced the self-confidence required to wear a single strip of hair on their lips.”

Today, men who wear a mustache do so with a giant pair of inverted commas on either side of it. So firmly has it become a joke that an annual charitable event (“Movember”) now exists daring men to grow one for an entire month each year — as if the act of wearing a mustache was now so hilariously out of fashion, men need to be challenged to do it.

But now that young Bieber has sported a mustache, no doubt in an attempt to co-opt some hipsterish cool for his increasingly fragile personal brand, the irony is almost entirely washed out. It’s too soon to say, but this could be the final death knell for the hipster mustache. And who would wear one then?

Morris, in his excellent 2009 essay, calls for a hero to bring the mustache back into public esteem — but the negative associations may now run too deep for that. This reporter once shaved a beard off into a mustache for a party, and was greeted with cheers, laughter and selfie invitations. But midway through the night, I caught myself in a mirror and realized my mustache was no longer ironic. To most people I encountered, it was just a mustache. I’ve never worn one again.

TIME Television

The Simpsons Kills Off Krusty’s Dad in Season Premiere

Krusty the Clown The Simpsons Season 26 Premier
FOX

An obituary for the father of beloved entertainer Krusty the Clown, who died in Springfield this weekend

Fans of The Simpsons will be sitting shiva tonight for Rabbi Hyman Krustofski, father of chain-smoking children’s entertainer Krusty the Clown and the first fatality of the show’s 26th season.

Voiced by comedian Jackie Mason, Pa Krusty died on Sept. 29. He was born and raised in the Lower East Side of Springfield, where he became “the most respected man” in the community. It was there that he raised a son, Herschel.

Rabbi Krustofski intended for his son to become a rabbi like himself and Herschel’s grandfather, but the boy’s desire to become a clown came between the two. Herschel grew up to become Krusty the Clown, a figure of joy to kids in the town of Springfield (State Still TBD) and beyond. But the Krustofskis were estranged for many years, and only reunited with the help of a couple local children: Bart and Lisa Simpson.

Late in life, Krustofski reunited with his son again when Krusty decided to finally have his Bar Mitzvah. But the rabbi was again disappointed by his son when, after Hyman taught his son about Judaism, Krusty decision to televise the event, in a comeback bid after his show was canceled.

Although “Krusty the Klown’s Wet ‘n’ Wild Bar Mitzvah” was a hit, it again damaged relations between the pair. But Krusty finally decided to have a second, more traditional Bar Mitzvah at a Jewish temple, to the delight of his father. The rabbi was also due to preside over his son’s 15th wedding, to “Princess Penelope,” until Krusty ditched her at the altar.

Rabbi Krustofski’s fate had been in question ever since Simpsons producer Al Jean said during a publicity tour last year that a character would meet his maker in the season opener. “I’ll give you a clue that the actor playing the character won an Emmy for playing that character, but I won’t say who it is,” he said. Mason won the award for playing the role of Krustofski in 1992.

Krustofski is not the first semi-regular character to die in the otherwise ageless universe of The Simpsons. He will join Maude Flanders, Bleeding Gums Murphy, Mona Simpson (Homer’s mom), Amber Simpson (Homer’s Las Vegas wife), and Edna Krabappel in the Springfield graveyard.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com