TIME

Here’s Where You Should Live to Find Your Perfect Match

Find out how big your dating pool actually is in your current city

Looking for love in all the wrong places?

Enter your dating preferences and find out which cities have the highest percentage of people who match them. The results are based on over 15 million individual records from the U.S. Census. You can start with your current city to see how the local single population measures up. Or let fate decide. Your responses never leave your computer and are not monitored.

 

Of course, we all are looking for things in potential mate that go beyond the sort of demographic information that the Census collections. There’s no field for religion, for example, much less for sense of humor or affinity for dogs.

Since the Census Bureau’s annual survey does not ask about sexual preferences, this interactive groups all single people together. Given that the quiz primarily deals with the percent of the single population that matches your specifications, not the raw number, the premise is equally relevant for those seeking same-sex and opposite-sex partners. (This assumes that the gay and straight populations have roughly the same distribution of income and education.)

Like all surveys, things can get wonky when you’re looking for a very specific and uncommon combination of traits. Then again, if you are certain that your perfect mate is a divorced 18-21 year old with a professional degree, your problems dating probably extend beyond statistical aberrations in Census data.

Methodology

The raw data comes from the American Community Survey, the Census Bureau’s annual survey of 1 percent of the population, via the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. To gather a sufficient sample for a granular analysis of the data, this project combines and averages the surveys from 2009-2013.

Source

Steven Ruggles, J. Trent Alexander, Katie Genadek, Ronald Goeken, Matthew B. Schroeder, and Matthew Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 5.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010.

TIME

This Is How Far Barack Obama Has Traveled Around the World

President Obama’s meeting in Saudi Arabia Tuesday with its new king marks his 84th visit to a foreign country as president, including repeat visits. By TIME’s estimation, he has now accumulated over 447,000 frequent flyer miles in international travel since January 2009, including flights returning to the United States.

Follow each of those trips below with the arrow buttons and watch those totals accumulate. You can skip to the end by using the left arrow from the first slide.

Methodology

Total miles are calculated as the round-trip distance between Washington, D.C. and a given location. Since the figures don’t account for routes and intermediate stops for refueling, the actual figure is likely to be higher. For trips that include multiple stops, the calculation only factors in the flight from Washington for the first and last leg.

TIME

The 30 Most Popular Baby Names That Are Also Foods

A French judge has banned Nutella as a baby name. But the U.S. is home to dozens of boys and girls named Kale, Heinz and Hennessy

A French court ruled recently that a newborn baby could not be named “Nutella,” reasoning that “it is contrary to the child’s interest to be wearing a name like that can only lead to teasing or disparaging thoughts.”

A thorough TIME investigation did not turn up any evidence of a Nutella being born in the United States since 1880, the earliest year for which baby name data is available from the Social Security Administration. (Pre-1880 Nutellas are unlikely; Nutella was developed in the 1940s). By comparing the most-recent set of newborn names against a list of 25,369 foods (mined from Wikipedia), we did find 30 other gourmet names that were given to American babies in 2013. Only names that show up at least five times in a given year are publicly reported.

Name Gender Number (2013)
Apple Female 27
Basil Male 56
Basil Female 21
Berry Male 5
Bison Male 5
Brie Female 51
Candy Female 62
Chardonnay Female 5
Curry Male 7
Danish Male 6
Dasani Female 34
Dasani Male 9
Dijon Male 19
Evian Male 8
Evian Female 8
Heinz Male 5
Hennessy Female 62
Honey Female 57
Kale Male 257
Kale Female 5
Kipper Male 6
Maple Female 44
Pike Male 6
Romaine Male 6
Rye Female 5
Shiraz Male 6
Skyy Female 94
Skyy Male 7
Sundae Female 7

This list does not include names like “Clementine” and “Rosemary” that are common enough not to be automatically associated with food.

Looking to name your child something non-food related? TIME can predict how popular a name will be in the next 25 years. Check out the interactive below.

 

TIME

Growth of Muslim Populations in Europe Map

 

The recent terrorist attacks in Paris have brought new attention to the small number of European Muslims who turn to violent extremism. Fears center around the number of Europeans who have fought in Iraq and Syria and could return to the continent. Amid tensions over terrorism and intolerance in France, the Muslim population there is projected to grow steadily in the coming years in comparison to non-Muslim populations and in many other European counties. Demographic changes, including lower birthrates for non-Muslim Europeans, are contributing to the changing face of Europe’s religious and ethnic make-up. The above map shows historical data and projections for the growth of Muslim populations in Europe in 2030.

Methodology
Population estimates from Pew Research Religion and Public Life Project. According to the methodology in the organization’s report, the 1990 figure for France and several other countries maybe be artificially low. Estimates for the number of fighters in Iraq and Syria come from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation in London.

TIME

Wall Street Money Can Predict How Democrats Vote. Here’s How

Follow the money in the latest budget vote which rolled back regulations on banks and divided House Democrats

A week after the gargantuan spending deal squeezed through Congress, many Democrats are still smarting over a provision in the bill that rolls back regulation on how banks can take risks with taxpayer money.

While the financial sector’s boon was too big a pill for many on the left to swallow, 57 Democrats in the House ultimately voted for the legislation, pushing the bill over the goal line. (The final vote for the bill, which picked up the nickname “Cromnibus” along the way, was 219-206).

As the Washington Post noticed last week, those 57 Democrats received considerably more money in campaign donations from the financial sector than their colleagues who voted against the bill. While this may not be terribly surprising, it is an usually clear example of the correlation between money and votes. (As always, the causation–whether the money directly influenced a lawmaker’s vote–does not come along for the ride in this analysis.)

To put a finer point on it, TIME collected data from the Center for Responsive Politics on how much money financial companies gave to each House Democrat in the past two years. When you line up the members in the order of how much they got and how they voted, the pattern is pretty clear. (A handful of newer members are missing due to incomplete data.)

The controversial provision was originally a standalone bill, parts of which was reportedly drafted by Citibank lobbyists. That bill passed the House in 2013 with the support of 70 Democrats but never became law. The divide in the party among those who receive significant contributions from the financial sector was even more apparent then.

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate companies gave a total of $304 Million to members of congress in the last election cycle, more than any other industry identified by the Centre for Responsive Politics. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and John Boehner (R-OH) are top recipients from this industry each receiving over $3 Million. The same companies also gave Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS), the congressman who introduced the controversial amendment into the spending bill, $206,700 in the same cycle. These figures don’t include the money that groups like Citibank spent on lobbying efforts.

Members of Congress make voting decisions based on an extraordinary number of considerations, and any given representative can argue quite persuasively that he or she is not motivated by the wants and desires of major donors. When you zoom out, however, you see a correlation between donations and voting behavior that is very unlikely to be a random occurrence, regardless of the root causes.

Methodology

These figures represent political action committees (PACs) representing financial companies made to candidates, not employees who work for those companies, and do not include contributions made to members’ leadership PACs. The Center for Responsive Politics defines financial companies as commercial banks, credit unions, real estate companies, and a variety of other related industries. The correlation coefficient between the binary outcome of the vote and the dollar amount of contributions was 0.34 for HR 83 and 0.42 for HR 992.

 

TIME facebook

How Well Do You Know Your Facebook Friends?

Take this quiz to find out

We all have Facebook friends with certain tells in their choice of status updates. There are the unabashedly peppy, the unrelenting complainers and the 800-word posters. To test how well you can identify your Facebook friends by these clues, we’ve built a simple quiz: This app will randomly select status updates from your recent newsfeed and present you with five possible authors for each one. (Note: This will not work for all users due to differences in privacy settings. If you’re asked for your password, you’ll be logging into Facebook. TIME is not recording or storing your password.)

Research suggests that a lot of our offline personality can shine through on Facebook, even if most of us complain about our friends’ behavior online. (And don’t delay. Facebook will soon be shutting down the service that lets us make apps like this one or the classic “How Much Time Have You Wasted On Facebook?”)

Read next: Find Out Which of Your Facebook Friends Makes You the Happiest

TIME

This Is the Most Popular Christmas Song Ever

TIME crunches the merry numbers behind the most popular Christmas songs of the modern era

The names Joseph Mohr and Franz Xaver Gruber have largely vanished into the annals of Christmas tormentors, but their greatest triumph lives on. “Silent Night,” which Mohr wrote the lyrics for (in German) in 1816 and Gruber put to music two years later, is the most recorded Christmas song in the modern era of the holiday’s substantial oeuvre.

To determine this fact, TIME crawled the records at the U.S. Copyright Office, which offers digitized registrations going back to 1978, and collected data on every Christmas album recorded since that time. “Silent Night,” it turns out, is not merely the most popular carol; with 733 copyrighted recordings since 1978, it is nearly twice as dominant as “Joy to the World,” a distant second with 391 records to its name.

As one might surmise, songs that are no longer under their original copyright are considerably more prominent on modern Christmas albums, given that one needn’t share the holiday windfall. This lends an obvious advantage to the ecclesiastical hymns and tunes, like “O Holy Night” and “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen.” As intellectual property lawyer Paul C. Jorgensen explains, this does nothing to prevent artists from copyrighting their own recording of a song and collecting royalties whenever a radio station wants to play it–assuming the other 732 renditions weren’t to taste.

Nor is it strictly limited to American recording artists. “A lot of international artists will go ahead and register things in the United States,” Jorgensen said.

To determine secularity, TIME measured the likelihood that a song appears on the same album with either “What Child Is This?”, a decidedly devout 1865 tune, or “Jingle Bell Rock,” roughly it’s polar opposite. (The choice of those two songs is rather arbitrary, but proved in trial and error to offer the clearest dichotomy.) In true Christmas spirit, “Silent Night” aptly bridges that great divide: It co-headlines with just about anyone.

Methodology

This project began by downloading every copyrighted recording of “Jingle Bells,” then expanding to every song on the same album as “Jingle Bells,” and so forth until the universe of Christmas music was exhausted. The data only includes “sound recording” records from the Copyright Office, as opposed to sheet music arrangements, videos, and other formats in which one might copyright a song. Variations on the same material, such as “O Christmas Tree” and “O Tannenbaum,” where grouped as one song.

Design by Alexander Ho

TIME

The Jaden and Willow Smith Poetry Generator

Let the famous Hollywood siblings be your inspiration

He is a 16-year-old actor and musician. She is a 14-year-old musician with one big hit under her belt already. Together, they are Hollywood royalty and apparently vessels for some extraterrestrial wisdom, if judged by this interview published by T Magazine Monday. To celebrate the uncanny insight of Jaden and Willow Smith, son and daughter of Will and Jada Pinkett Smith, we present you with this poetry generator using their own words from the new interview.

Read next: The 5 Weirdest Things Willow and Jaden Smith Said In That T Interview

TIME

How Liberal is Your Burger?

See the political leanings of the places Johnny Rockets, White Castle and other fast food restaurants call home

No matter how avowedly nonpartisan they claim to be, every major retailer has a political identity ingrained in the locations of its stores. Six in 10 Johnny Rockets can be found in Democratic congressional districts, while eight in 10 Sonics are in districts that will send a Republican to Washington in 2015. (Fifty-eight percent of Congressional districts will be held by Republicans come January.) TIME recently explored these dynamics in an interactive chart that is reprinted at the bottom of this post.

To further plumb the mysteries of burger politics, here are a few lists of the chains that are most often found in only Democratic or only Republican districts.

We also ran the numbers for clothing, grocery stores and auto dealerships. Fancy an Arby’s sandwich? Odds are you’ll be driving there in your Buick.

The Most Liberal Burgers in America

Franchise Dem. Rep. Total locations
Johnny Rockets 61% 39% 195
White Castle 58% 42% 409
Jack in the Box 53% 47% 2106
Checkers Drive-In Restaurants 53% 47% 494
In-N-Out Burger 52% 48% 264

The Most Conservative Burgers in America

Franchise Rep. Dem. Total locations
Jack’s Family Restaurants 95% 5% 127
Hardee’s 83% 17% 1741
Sonic 82% 18% 3435
HWY 55 78% 22% 112
Arby’s 76% 24% 3188

The Most Liberal Car Dealerships in America

Franchise Dem. Rep. Total locations
Tesla Motors 66% 34% 101
MINI 56% 44% 113
Land Rover 49% 51% 156
Audi 49% 51% 273
Acura 49% 51% 263

The Most Conservative Car Dealerships in America

Franchise Rep. Dem. Total locations
Lincoln 77% 23% 786
Pontiac 77% 23% 2021
Buick 76% 24% 2025
Chevrolet 74% 26% 2973
Ford Motor Company 74% 26% 3015

The Most Liberal Clothing in America

Franchise Dem. Rep. Total locations
American Apparel 84% 16% 134
Simply Fashion 77% 23% 228
Rainbow Shops 72% 28% 980
H & M 62% 38% 298
7 For All Mankind 62% 38% 732

The Most Conservative Clothing in America

Franchise Rep. Dem. Total locations
Factory Connection 95% 5% 282
Cato Fashions 83% 17% 1052
maurices 83% 17% 887
Vanity 81% 19% 148
Buckle 78% 22% 452

The Most Liberal Grocery Stores in America

Franchise Dem. Rep. Total locations
Stop & Shop 83% 17% 395
Whole Foods Market 67% 33% 293
Trader Joe’s 65% 35% 418
Safeway 64% 36% 865
A&P 63% 37% 300

The Most Conservative Grocery Stores in America

Franchise Rep. Dem. Total locations
Weis Markets 83% 17% 321
Kroger 78% 22% 1297
IGA 77% 23% 1081
Food Lion 76% 24% 1113
Winn-Dixie 73% 27% 628

 

TIME interactive

Are You a J. Crew Democrat or a Pizza Hut Republican?

Check out this chart and search tool to see the political leanings of the places that Starbucks, Walmart, and 2,700 other companies call home

If you live near a Ben & Jerry’s or a few Dunkin’ Donuts outposts, odds are good that your Congressional district elected a Democrat on Tuesday. More familiar with the inside of a Pizza Hut or a Long John Silver’s? Chances are you’ll be represented next year by a Republican.

The following chart places 49 common brands on a political spectrum based on the percentage of their brick-and-mortar stores that are located in Democratic or Republican districts. To do this, TIME matched nearly 2 million store locations provided by the research company AggData to their corresponding Congressional district and then tallied them by that district’s vote in 2014 midterms. Of the 139 American Apparel stores, for example, 83 percent are in blue districts. Nearly nine in 10 Belk department stores, meanwhile, can be found in red districts. All the other brands on the chart fall somewhere in between. You can look for any store you like in the search tool below the graphic.

There is no evidence, of course, that a regular infusion of banana ice cream and fudge chunks inspires a person toward liberalism. Because two-thirds of the Ben & Jerry’s in the United States are found in Democratic districts, however, the mere presence of a store in a district raises the statistical odds that its residents are people who vote for Democrats.

While stores like Whole Foods or Hobby Lobby might already conjure partisan stereotypes, the vast majority of America’s brands do not. Even so, where these stores are located tells us a tremendous amount about who their shoppers are sending to Washington.

Methodology

The list of retail locations was provided by AggData. Stores were matched to Congressional district by comparing their longitude and latitude to the Census definitions of districts. The results do not include the 14 Congressional races that have yet to be resolved as of 6:00 AM on Nov. 6, 2014.

Read next: How the World Sees America Now

Correction: The interactive chart originally linked the incorrect record for Armani Exchange when the user clicked the icon in the chart. It has since been updated.

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