TIME Music

Bono Thanks New York Firefighters on Stage For Saving Him After Bike Crash

Bono U2
Kevin Mazur—WireImage/Getty Images Bono and The Edge perform onstage during U2's iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE tour at Madison Square Garden in New York City, on July 18, 2015.

He also invited Paul Simon and the woman who dialled 911 onto the U2 stage

NEW YORK — The special guests at U2’s concert Thursday night included Paul Simon, Lou Reed’s widow and the woman who called 911 when Bono fell off his bike in New York City last year.

Simon joined U2 onstage at Madison Square Garden to sing some of his song, “Mother and Child Reunion.” Before Bono kicked off the tune, he pointed out that Simon was in the crowd, and the audience roared as Simon entered the stage.

Bono also noted that Reed’s widow, musician Laurie Anderson, was in the audience of 20,000. The band performed Reed’s “Satellite of Love” as a video of the late icon singing the song appeared onscreen.

Bono, who crashed his bike in Central Park and suffered multiple injuries last year, called out the woman who dialed 911 and the firefighters who responded to the call. They sat close to the stage.

“I am here today because some people, when I crashed my bike here in the city, a beautiful girl made a phone call to 911. She’s from Denver, but she’s here tonight. And so is Engine 44, the firefighters that picked me up off the ground,” he said.

Bono then handed the microphone to the responders to recount the story.

“So I have to clarify, it’s Alyssa and I’m from D.C., not Denver,” the woman said.

It earned her laughs. But her shine ended shortly after.

“Here’s what happened: I was running in Central Park, there was an accident, obviously I had to stop and help because I’m not from New York, I’m from Virginia, where people are nice,” she said as the audience booed as she tried to finish the story.

Bono, 55, completed surgery after suffering fractures to his left eye socket, shoulder blade and left elbow following his fall.

But he was energetic and excited Thursday, working the entire stage at the loud arena alongside guitarist the Edge, bassist Adam Clayton and drummer Larry Mullen Jr.

The North American leg of U2’s Innocence + Experience Tour ends Friday at Madison Square Garden, which will mark the band’s eighth consecutive show at the famed venue since July 18.

The band will tour Europe in September.

TIME Civil Rights

Confederate Flags Placed at Martin Luther King’s Church

Raphael Warnock, George Turner
David Goldman—AP Atlanta Police Chief George Turner, left, speaks next to Raphael G. Warnock, pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, during a news conference in Atlanda on July 30, 2015

The placing of the flags was the latest provocative act involving the Civil War-era symbol

(ATLANTA) — Surveillance cameras caught images of two white males laying Confederate battle flags on the ground near the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s church, but it wasn’t clear whether they had committed a crime.

Atlanta police Chief George Turner said Thursday his officers were working with federal authorities and hadn’t determined what, if any, charges might be sought. Turner said they had not ruled out a hate crime, though Georgia has no state hate crimes law.

An officer from the Atlanta FBI’s joint terrorism task force was on the scene “to better determine if any specific threats were received” and to provide support to Atlanta police, FBI Special Agent Steve Emmett said in an email.

The placing of the flags was the latest provocative act involving the Civil War-era symbol since nine black church members were gunned down during Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina, and it happened in the heart of an area devoted to the slain civil rights leader, near his birthplace, his crypt and a center devoted to preserving his legacy.

The Rev. Raphael Warnock, senior pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church, called placing the flags on church grounds a “terroristic threat.”

“This act by a cowardly and misguided individual or individuals is provocative to say the least. It ought to get the attention not only of black people but of freedom-loving people,” he said. “To place Confederate flags on the campus of Ebenezer Baptist Church after this horrific act in Charleston, in the wake of all this happening in our country, whatever the message was, it was clearly not about heritage, it was about hate.”

Two former Georgia prosecutors said leaving the flags alone doesn’t amount to a terroristic threat in the eyes of the law.

Bob Keller, the Clayton County district attorney for nearly three decades until 2004, said he couldn’t think of a crime they had committed.

“It was certainly divisive and not acceptable behavior the way it was done, but I cannot find a criminal act to it,” he said.

Ken Hodges, who served as Dougherty County district attorney from 1997 to 2008, struggled at first to think of a crime they might have committed before saying a charge of vandalism to a place of worship might be possible. That includes the malicious defacing or desecration of a church or other place of worship.

King preached at Ebenezer Baptist Church on Auburn Avenue, once a bustling center of commerce for Atlanta’s African-American businesses and residents. The area is home to the historic church and a new church building where the congregation now meets and where the flags were placed. Nearby is the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and all of those buildings are just a short walk from the home of King’s grandparents, where he lived for the first 12 years of his life.

Atlanta police officer Gary Wade said a maintenance worker discovered the flags at 6 a.m. Thursday and notified the National Park Service, which operates the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, which is adjacent to the church.

The flags weren’t stuck in the ground but instead laid flat. One was placed near a bell tower under a poster that said: “Black Lives Matter.” The slogan, which has been spray-painted on Confederate monuments across the South this summer, has become part of a movement of civil rights supporters who say police treat blacks unfairly.

Warnock said black clergy from around the country were gathered at Ebenezer on Thursday to discuss the role of black churches in social justice issues, including mass incarceration. The placing of the flags only strengthens their resolve, he said.

Superintendent Judy Forte of the National Park Service said her office at the King historic site received a threatening phone message the day before the shooting at the South Carolina church. The message was rambling and “very alarming and they did mention coming here to the historic site,” she said. There was no indication that was connected to the flags.

At some point within the last two years, a Confederate battle flag was placed at the tomb of King and his wife Coretta across the street from the church, said Forte, who couldn’t recall exactly when that happened.

“It was disturbing and sickening, but unfortunately not terribly surprising,” Warnock said of the latest incident. “We’ve seen this kind of ugliness before.”

___

Associated Press writer Jeff Martin contributed to this report.

TIME Israel

Palestinian Child Killed in Suspected Jewish Settler Attack

Palestinian Baby Dies In Arson Attack
Oren Ziv—Getty Images Family members and relatives of 18 month old baby, Ali Saad-Dawabsheh, view the remains of their house after a fire which was suspected to have been set by Jewish extremists on July 31, in the Palestinian village of Duma, West Bank.

Jewish extremists have for years attacked Palestinian property

(DUMA, West Bank) — Suspected Jewish assailants attacked a Palestinian village in the West Bank early Friday and torched two homes, killing a young child and critically wounding at least three people, Israeli and Palestinian officials said. The Israeli prime minister called the incident a “terror attack.”

According to the military, the suspects entered the village of Duma, near the city of Nablus, where they set the homes ablaze and scrawled graffiti, including “Long live the Messiah,” ”revenge” and “price tag.”

The attackers threw Molotov cocktails, or fire bombs, at the houses, the military said.

The slain child was identified as one-and-a-half year old Ali Dawabsheh. His four-year-old brother and parents were among the wounded, according to Gassan Daghlas, a Palestinian official from the Nablus area.

Daghlas said Jewish settlers broke the window of a house and flung a burning object inside, “causing a quick and huge fire.” He added that three people were wounded aside from the child. The Israeli military said three people were critically wounded and one was slightly injured. The critically wounded were taken to Israeli hospitals for treatment, the military said.

“Setters in the Nablus area are very aggressive. They never stop attacking Palestinians in their villages and the Israeli government needs to put an end to these aggressions,” Daghlas said.

The Israeli military said it sent troop reinforcements to the West Bank, fearing the incident could trigger unrest.

Jewish extremists have for years attacked Palestinian property, as well as mosques, churches and even Israeli military bases in opposition to what they see as the Israeli government’s favorable policies toward the Palestinians, although it is rare for anyone to be killed in such attacks.

Critics say police have been slow to apprehend the assailants and Palestinians say the military has failed to protect them from attacks by militant Jewish settlers in the West Bank.

The attacks, known as “price tag,” have been condemned across the Israeli political spectrum and condemnations came swiftly Friday, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issuing a stern statement against the violence.

“I am shocked over this reprehensible and horrific act. This is an act of terrorism in every respect. The State of Israel takes a strong line against terrorism regardless of who the perpetrators are,” he said.

Israeli military spokesman Lt. Col. Peter Lerner called the incident “nothing short of a barbaric act of terrorism.”

Israeli Defence Minister Moshe Yaalon said Israel would not allow “Jewish terrorists” to carry out such acts.

“We will not allow Jewish terrorists to harm the lives of Palestinians in Judea and Samaria,” he said in a statement, referring to the West Bank by its biblical name. “We will fight against them firmly and with all means and tools at our disposal.”

Meanwhile, Israeli police said they would restrict entrance to Friday prayers at a Jerusalem mosque to male worshippers over the age of 50. Police said the decision was not necessarily related to the West Bank incident and comes as police received word that Palestinian youth at the mosque planned to cause disturbances.

___

Daraghmeh reported from Ramallah. Associated Press writer Tia Goldenberg contributed to this report from Tel Aviv, Israel.

TIME Football

Patriots Open Training Camp Amid Deflategate Drama

NFL: New England Patriots-Training Camp
Winslow Townson—USA Today Sports New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) rolls out during training camp at Gillette Stadium on July 30, 2015.

More than 10,000 fans turned out to to cheer Tom Brady and the Patriots

(FOXBOROUGH, Mass.) — Fans drove to Gillette Stadium past a booth selling “Free Tom Brady” T-shirts.

Then, when they arrived for the New England Patriots’ first training camp practice on Thursday, they let the star quarterback know how they felt.

Brady took the field to a boisterous cheer from the more than 10,000 fans who sat in a sweltering sun to see the Super Bowl champions open the defense of their title.

Team owner Robert Kraft, who lashed out at the NFL a day earlier for upholding Brady’s suspension, also got loud applause when he came out on the field.

Kraft waved to fans when he arrived and then signed autographs for about 20 minutes at the end of practice. Fans were overwhelmingly supportive of the owner, according to an Associated Press photographer who witnessed the exchanges in an area off limits to writers.

Up above, an airplane buzzed the practice field towing a banner that said: “Cheaters Look Up!” and listing the Twitter handle of a New York Jets fan website.

But at ground level, Brady looked sharp in his first football action since the Patriots beat the Seattle Seahawks in February for the franchise’s — and his — fourth NFL title. He even had a one-handed touchdown catch on a pass from Julian Edelman, according to a video posted online by a member of the public. (The Patriots do not allow media to report on formations or trick plays.)

Brady was suspended four games and the team was docked $1 million and two draft picks for what the NFL said was a scheme to provide insufficiently inflated footballs for the AFC championship game against the Indianapolis Colts. Brady appealed, but Commissioner Roger Goodell upheld the punishment on Tuesday.

Both the players union and the NFL filed lawsuits in U.S. District Court seeking support for their position. Before the Patriots took the field on Thursday, a judge in Minnesota rejected the union’s suit and said the case would be heard in New York.

But Brady was a winner again on the field, with fans chanting his name and waving signs in support of the three-time Super Bowl MVP. He was not available to the media on Thursday, slipping away through an inaccessible exit after practice.

Backup Jimmy Garoppolo told reporters that he was not thinking about whether he would have to start for the first four games if Brady’s suspension holds. He said he does not have a preference on whether he likes the football hard or soft.

In response to failed appeal, online gambling site Bovada dropped the Patriots odds of winning the Super Bowl from 9-1 to 12-1. The website said Garoppolo’s over/under for touchdowns in the first four games is 4, and for interceptions it was 3.5.

(The over/under for ways the website spelled Garoppolo in its news release was 2.)

Earlier, coach Bill Belichick declined to answer questions about the deflated footballs scandal for the second straight day, citing Kraft’s admonition that the team shouldn’t discuss it.

His players followed suit.

___

AP Photographer Charles Krupa contributed to this story.

TIME Maryland

Maryland to Close Controversial Baltimore Jail

Larry Hogan, Stephen Moyer
Patrick Semansky—AP Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, center, speaks alongside Maryland Secretary of Public Safety and Correctional Services Stephen Moyer at Baltimore City Detention Center on July 30, 2015, in Baltimore.

Inmates and guards ran a criminal conspiracy inside the jail

(BALTIMORE) — Maryland’s governor announced plans Thursday to immediately shut down Baltimore’s state-run jail, where inmates and guards ran a criminal conspiracy inside vermin-infested, 19th-century walls and thwarted decades of attempted reforms.

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan said the state would save $10 million to $15 million a year by closing the Baltimore City Detention Center, which houses hundreds of inmates awaiting trial or serving short sentences. Current employees and inmates will be reassigned to other facilities, he said.

“There is plenty of capacity elsewhere in the system to meet this need,” Hogan said. “Given the space that we have, it makes no sense whatsoever to keep this deplorable facility open.”

While standing by the crumbling building where inmates could be heard shouting from within, Hogan sharply criticized his predecessor, former Gov. Martin O’Malley, for failing to take stronger action to prevent corruption at the facility and not closing it sooner. O’Malley is now seeking the Democratic nomination for president.

“Maryland taxpayers were unwittingly underwriting a vast criminal enterprise run by gang members and corrupt public servants,” Hogan said. “Ignoring it was irresponsible and one of the biggest failures in leadership in the history of the state of Maryland.”

A sweeping federal indictment in 2013 exposed a sophisticated drug- and cellphone-smuggling ring involving dozens of gang members and correctional officers at the jail. The investigation also exposed sexual relations between jailhouse gang leader Tavon White and female guards that left four of them pregnant.

Forty of the 44 defendants charged in the racketeering conspiracy were convicted, including 24 correctional officers. Thirty-five defendants pleaded guilty; eight defendants went to trial and one defendant died. White pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 12 years in prison.

The ACLU and the Baltimore-based Public Justice Center last month called on a federal judge to reopen a lawsuit against the state of Maryland over what the agencies described as substandard conditions.

According to the lawsuit, the jail’s medical and mental health care possibly played a role in the death of seven inmates over the last couple of years. The groups allege inmates suffering from illnesses such as HIV and diabetes were denied life-sustaining prescription medication. The filing also described moldy showers, cells infested with mice and cockroaches, poor ventilation and broken toilets.

The agencies also said the state failed to cure systemic problems since taking control 25 years ago, despite entering into a 2007 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice.

In response, Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services Secretary Stephen Moyer said he was committed to changes. He noted the state has spent more than $58 million over the past 10 years to improve the safety and security of inmates and staff.

David Fathi, director of the ACLU National Prison Project, said closing the facility would be a positive step, though he expressed concern about how hundreds of inmates would be transferred. For security reasons, their destinations will not be disclosed in advance.

“Given the jail’s history of dysfunction we’re concerned about implementation, where the prisoners will go and if that will generate crowding in other facilities,” Fathi said. “We’ve consistently seen problems that when detainees are transferred from one facility to another, the ball often gets dropped with regard to their health care, sometimes with serious consequences.”

The state has run the jail since 1991 and says it is one of the largest municipal jails in the country. Parts of the complex, which also has wings housing women and juveniles, date to 1859. Only the men’s detention center is being closed. The men’s facility had 1,092 inmates on Thursday, with about 845 waiting for trial. About 750 are expected to be moved, because other buildings in the complex could accommodate some, said Mark Vernarelli, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Corrections.

___

Associated Press writers Juliet Linderman in Baltimore and David Dishneau in Hagerstown, Maryland, contributed to this report.

TIME Israel

Jewish Man Stabs 6 People at Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade

Ultra Orthodox Jew Yishai Schlissel is detained by plain-clothes police officers after he stabbed people during a gay pride parade in Jerusalem on July 30, 2015.
Sebastian Scheiner—AP Ultra Orthodox Jew Yishai Schlissel is detained by plain-clothes police officers after he stabbed people during a gay pride parade in Jerusalem on July 30, 2015.

The alleged attacker was jailed for stabbing people at a 2005 pride parade

(JERUSALEM) — An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man lunged into a group of revelers leading Jerusalem’s annual gay pride parade and stabbed six of them Thursday evening as they marched in the holy city, Israeli police and witnesses said.

The alleged attacker, Yishai Schlissel, had recently been released from prison after serving a term for stabbing several people at a gay pride parade in 2005, police spokeswoman Luba Samri said, adding that he was arrested at the scene of Thursday’s attack.

Eli Bin of Israel’s emergency service said six young people were wounded in the attack, two of them seriously.

The annual parade was proceeding as planned when the crowd’s joyful chants gave way to screams. Panic ensued, and a bloody woman fell to the ground, an Associated Press photographer at the scene said.

A man with blood seeping from his back wandered around with a dazed look before collapsing. Another man with his shirt off also had blood dripping down his back. Medics quickly surrounded them both and applied pressure to stop the bleeding.

Shocked revelers, some in tears, gathered along the sidewalk as ambulances and police on horses quickly arrived on the scene.

Schlissel was convicted of a similar attack that wounded several people at a gay pride parade in Jerusalem a decade ago. Media reports said that on Thursday he hid in a nearby supermarket and jumped out to attack the march when it passed nearby.

Jerusalem police spokesman Asi Ahroni said there was a “massive presence” of police securing the parade but “unfortunately the man managed to pull out a knife and attack.”

A medic that treated the wounded at the scene, Hanoch Zelinger, said one woman was stabbed in the back, chest and neck, and was lying unconscious on the ground.

Shaarei Tzedek hospital said it was treating a man with stab wounds who was in serious condition and a woman in critical condition, both in their 20s.

The parade continued after the wounded were taken for treatment, but in a more somber atmosphere. Media reported that thousands of Jerusalem residents who had not participated in the parade joined in after the attack in solidarity.

“I do think that homophobia is rooted in the city, but that’s the point of the parade,” said Benny Zupick, 21, shortly after the attack. “We are trying to change that. And hopefully we will change that. It takes one man to create a scene like this. Hopefully he’s a minority.”

A majority of Jerusalem’s residents are either observant Jews or Muslim or Christian Palestinians, conservative communities that oppose homosexuality. Previous parades have drawn opposition.

The heads of Israel’s ultra-Orthodox parties, along with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon and others across the Israeli political spectrum condemned the attack.

“People celebrating their freedom and expressing their identity were viciously stabbed. We must not be deluded, a lack of tolerance will lead us to disaster. We cannot allow such crimes, and we must condemn those who commit and support them,” President Reuven Rivlin said.

Jerusalem’s annual parade is smaller and more restrained than the annual gay pride march in Tel Aviv, which was attended by some 100,000 revelers last month.

Tel Aviv has emerged as one of the world’s most gay-friendly travel destinations recently, in sharp contrast to most of the rest of the Middle East, where gays are persecuted or even killed.

Gays serve openly in Israel’s military and parliament, and many popular artists and entertainers are gay, but gays still face hostility among religious Jews.

TIME Environment

Judge Fines Greenpeace $2,500 per Hour For Shell Protest

13 protesters repelled off a bridge to block a Shell icebreaker ship from leaving

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A federal judge in Alaska on Thursday ordered Greenpeace USA to pay a fine of $2,500 for every hour that protesters dangle from a bridge in Oregon and block a Royal Dutch Shell icebreaker from leaving for oil drilling in the Arctic.

There was no sign that the protesters were going to abandon the blockade in Portland after the ruling in Anchorage by U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason that Greenpeace is in civil contempt.

Greenpeace USA Executive Director Annie Leonard said the activists will stay in place for now.

“We are confronted with a huge decision, one we cannot make alone,” she said in a statement. “Right now we’re asking the activists what they think we should do next.”

Gleason in May granted Shell’s request that activists protesting Shell’s Arctic drilling plans be ordered to stay away from company vessels and beyond buffer zones.

Earlier in the day, the Shell oil icebreaker Fennica retreated when activists dangling from the St. Johns Bridgeover the Willamette River refused to leave and to let the vessel pass.

Protesters on the bridge and kayakers on the river have been blocking the icebreaker from heading to the Arctic for a drill operation.

The Fennica arrived in Portland for repairs last week. The vessel was damaged earlier this month in the Aleutian Islands when it struck an underwater obstruction, tearing a gash in its hull.

It resumed its journey to the Arctic early Thursday before stopping in the face of 13 dangling activists linked by ropes. The ship turned around and inched its way back to dry dock, delighting people gathered on shore in the city known for environmentalism.

The U.S. Coast Guard warned the danglers that they were breaking the law but took no action. Petty Officer 1st Class George Degener did not elaborate.

He also said the agency had not told the icebreaker to turn around.

“I don’t know what led the master and the pilot on board to come to that decision,” he said.

The icebreaker is a key part of Shell’s exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska’s northwest coast. It protects Shell’s fleet from ice and carries equipment that can stop the flow of oil that gushes from wells.

Environmentalists hope to delay the ship long enough for winter weather to prevent Shell from drilling until 2016. By that time, they hope the Obama administration has a change of heart on the issue.

At the court hearing in Anchorage, Judge Gleason said the hourly fine against Greenpeace would increase over the next few days unless the blockade is lifted. It would jump to $5,000 an hour on Friday, $7,500 an hour on Saturday, and $10,000 an hour on Sunday.

“They need to be off the ropes,” she said.

The St. Johns Bridge is at a key location on the Fennica’s route from Portland to the Arctic. The ship’s journey will take it beneath the bridge, down the Willamette to the Columbia River which leads to the Pacific Ocean.

Portland police closed the bridge to traffic during the standoff. It was reopened shortly after the icebreaker reversed course.

The activists say they have water and food for the long haul. They also have their phones to stay in the social-media loop.

“The Fennica is headed back to its dock where it belongs — not the Arctic! #ShellNo,” tweeted Dan Cannon, a Greenpeace activist dangling from the bridge.

___

Joling reported from Anchorage, Alaska.

Video provided by Adam Simmons

TIME celebrities

Judge Says Katy Perry’s Convent Sale Appears to Be Invalid

Katy Perry at Starkey Hearing Foundation Awards Gala in St. Paul, Minn. on July 26, 2015.
Andy King—AP Images for Starkey Hearing Foundation Katy Perry at Starkey Hearing Foundation Awards Gala in St. Paul, Minn. on July 26, 2015.

Perry has agreed to purchase the convent and an adjoining house of prayer

(LOS ANGELES) — A judge says he believes the sale of a hilltop convent to a businesswoman who wants to turn it into a hotel is invalid.

Los Angeles’ archbishop wants to sell the property to pop singer Katy Perry. But the sale is opposed by the order of nuns who own the convent.

Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant made the comments about the disputed sale but he did not immediately order businesswoman Dana Hollister to vacate the convent.

Chalfant will consider whether to allow Perry or Hollister to pay rent on the property while it is tied up by lawsuits.

Perry has agreed to pay $14.5 million for the convent and an adjoining house of prayer used by priests.

The “Roar” singer did not attend the hearing.

Another hearing was set for Sept. 15.

TIME celebrities

Mariah Carey to Make Directorial Debut on Hallmark Channel

Mariah Carey at 2015 Summer TCA Tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. on July 29, 2015.
Jon Kopaloff—Getty Images Mariah Carey at 2015 Summer TCA Tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. on July 29, 2015.

Adding her touch to this year's holiday season

(BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.) — Mariah Carey is making her directorial debut on the Hallmark Channel.

Carey will direct and co-star in “Mariah Carey’s Christmas Project,” the network announced Wednesday. Production will begin in the fall. The scripted film is slated to air in December as part of its annual “Countdown to Christmas” programming.

The announcement comes at a busy time for the singer. Next week, she’ll receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She recently launched a residency in Las Vegas where she performs her No. 1 hits, including “Vision of Love,” ”Hero” and “We Belong Together.”

TIME Iran

Iran Bans U.S. From U.N. Nuclear Inspections

Iran's Deputy Foreign Minister and chief nuclear negotiator Abbas Araghchi holds a press conference at Iran's Foreign Ministry in Tehran on July 22, 2015.
Fatemeh Bahrami—Anadolu Agency/Getty Images Iran's Deputy Foreign Minister and chief nuclear negotiator Abbas Araghchi holds a press conference at Iran's Foreign Ministry in Tehran on July 22, 2015.

"Inspectors should be from countries that have diplomatic relations with Islamic republic of Iran"

(TEHRAN, Iran) — Iran will not allow American or Canadian inspectors working for the U.N. nuclear watchdog to visit its nuclear facilities, an official said in remarks broadcast by state TV on Thursday.

Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araghchi said Iran will only allow inspectors from countries that have diplomatic relations with it. The previously undisclosed remarks were made during a Sunday meeting with parliamentarians.

“American and Canadian inspectors cannot be sent to Iran,” said Araghchi. “It is mentioned in the deal that inspectors should be from countries that have diplomatic relations with Islamic republic of Iran.”

He also said inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency will not have access to “sensitive and military documents.”

Iran and world powers reached a historical deal earlier this month aimed at curbing Tehran’s disputed nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of international sanctions. Western nations have long suspected Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons alongside its civilian atomic program, allegations denied by Tehran, which insists its nuclear activities are entirely peaceful.

The U.S. and Iran severed diplomatic relations after the 1979 Islamic revolution and the hostage crisis at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. Canada closed its embassy in Tehran and suspended diplomatic relations in 2012.

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