TIME

Clinton White House Records Set to Be Released

Hillary Clinton
Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton listens to a speaker during the 2014 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in New York on Sept. 24, 2014. Stephen Chernin—AFP/Getty Images

(WASHINGTON) — The National Archives is releasing a batch of documents that might shed light on painful chapters in Hillary Rodham Clinton’s life as first lady, just as she ponders a bid for the White House in 2016.

The 10,000 pages of records from the Clinton administration were expected to be released Friday. They touch on the Whitewater investigation into the Bill and Hillary Clinton’s land dealings in Arkansas; Bill Clinton’s affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky; the 1993 death of deputy White House counsel Vince Foster; and the pardons Bill Clinton granted in his final hours as president.

With these documents the National Archives will have released about 30,000 pages of papers since February. Both the Obama White House and the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas, have signed off on the release of the records.

Hillary Clinton’s influence in the White House is also expected to be explored in the papers, from her role on Clinton’s unsuccessful health care overhaul plan to her 2000 Senate campaign in New York.

Past installments have offered an unvarnished look at Bill Clinton’s two terms, detailing his unsuccessful attempt to change the health care system, Republicans’ sweeping victories in the 1994 midterm elections and the shaping of his wife’s public image.

Hillary Clinton, who went on to serve as a senator from New York and as President Barack Obama’s secretary of state, now is a powerful advocate for Democrats in the midterm elections and the leading Democratic prospect for president in 2016. The possibility of a presidential campaign has heightened interest in the documents by media organizations, political opposition researchers and historians.

In addition to the 1990s-era events, the papers will touch on Elena Kagan, now a Supreme Court justice, who as a White House counsel defended Bill Clinton in the lawsuit brought by ex-Arkansas state employee Paula Jones. Clinton’s testimony for the Jones lawsuit, in which he denied a sexual relationship with Lewinsky, led to his impeachment in 1998. The House approved two articles of impeachment against Clinton, but he was acquitted by the Senate.

The memos were previously withheld by the National Archives because they were exempt from disclosure under restrictions related to appointments to federal office and confidential advice received by the president from his advisers. Under the law, presidential records can be withheld from the public for 12 years after the end of an administration if they fall under certain restricted categories.

TIME Environment

Northern California Wildfire Destroys 5 Homes

(APPLEGATE, Calif.) — Officials say a wildfire burning along a Northern California interstate has destroyed five homes.

State fire officials released the figure on Thursday after previously reporting one home had been destroyed.

The fire along Interstate 80 about 40 miles northeast of Sacramento has burned through 420 acres. Containment has gone from 10 to 20 percent.

Other homes are under threat and some residents have been evacuated. Two lanes of eastbound I-80 remain closed.

The cause of the blaze is under investigation, though fire officials say they are looking into the possibility that human activity was to blame.

TIME Hong Kong

Hong Kong Government Cancels Talks With Protesters

A protester holds an umbrella during a performance on a main road in the occupied areas outside government headquarters in Hong Kong's Admiralty in Hong Kong, Oct. 9, 2014.
A protester holds an umbrella during a performance on a main road in the occupied areas outside government headquarters in Hong Kong's Admiralty in Hong Kong, Oct. 9, 2014. Kin Cheung—AP

(HONG KONG) — Hong Kong’s government on Thursday canceled talks with student leaders of a pro-democracy protest that has blocked streets in the city for nearly two weeks, with a senior official saying the discussions were unlikely to be constructive.

The talks, which had been scheduled for Friday, will not go ahead because they have been “seriously undermined” by remarks from the student leaders, said the official, Chief Secretary Carrie Lam.

Her announcement came hours after student leaders called for supporters to redouble their efforts to occupy the main protest zone — a highway outside government headquarters that they have dubbed “Umbrella Square.” Umbrellas used to combat police pepper spray and tear gas have become a symbol of the nonviolent movement.

“I truly regret that we will not be able to have a meeting tomorrow which will produce any constructive outcome,” Lam said.

Student leaders had vowed not to retreat even as the number of protesters occupying the main thoroughfare and streets in two busy shopping districts elsewhere in the former British colony has dwindled sharply this week.

Pro-democracy lawmakers, who so far haven’t played much of a role in the protests, said they would join in by blocking all government funding requests in the legislature except for the most urgent.

Protesters have occupied the streets since Sept. 28, when police used tear gas in a failed attempt to disperse tens of thousands of people in front of the government complex.

The protesters are demanding the government of the specially administered Chinese region abandon plans to allow Beijing to screen candidates for the city’s inaugural elections for its leader in 2017. They also want the current Beijing-backed leader, Leung Chun-ying, to resign.

The government’s announcement Thursday was greeted with little more than sneers by protesters.

“Two days ago they wanted to talk, now they won’t talk,” said Candice Heung, a university administrator who often joins the protest after work and believes the government is dragging out the confrontation. “This doesn’t matter at all.”

The reality, she said, is the government has no interest in sitting down with the students.

“They don’t want to talk,” she said.

___

Associated Press writer Tim Sullivan contributed to this report.

TIME

France’s Patrick Modiano Wins Literature Nobel

French writer Patrick Modiano in Paris in 2003.
French writer Patrick Modiano in Paris in 2003. Martin Bureau—AFP/Getty Images

(STOCKHOLM) — Patrick Modiano of France, whose work focuses on the Nazi occupation and its effect on his country, was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature Thursday.

The Swedish Academy gave the 8 million kronor ($1.1 million) prize to Modiano “for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation.”

Modiano, 69, whose novel “Missing Person” won the prestigious Prix Goncourt in 1978 — was born in a west Paris suburb two months after World War II ended in Europe in July 1945.

His father was of Jewish Italian origins and met his Belgian actress mother during the occupation of Paris — and his beginnings have strongly influenced his writing.

Jewishness, the Nazi occupation and loss of identity are recurrent themes in his novels, which include 1968’s “La Place de l’Etoile” — later hailed in Germany as a key Post-Holocaust work.

Modiano owes his first big break to a friend of his mother’s, French writer Raymond Queneau, who first introduced him to the Gallimard publishing house when he was in his early twenties.

Modiano, who lives in Paris, is known to shun media, and rarely accords interviews. In 2012, he won the Austrian State Prize for European Literature.

Canadian writer Alice Munro won the literature prize last year.

This year’s Nobel Prize announcements started Monday with a U.S.-British scientist splitting the medicine prize with a Norwegian husband-and-wife team for brain research that could pave the way for a better understanding of diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Two Japanese researchers and a Japanese-born American won the physics prize for the invention of blue light-emitting diodes, a breakthrough that spurred the development of LED as a new light source.

The chemistry prize on Wednesday went to two Americans and a German researcher who found new ways to give microscopes sharper vision, letting scientists peer into living cells with unprecedented detail to seek the roots of disease.

The announcements continue Friday with the Nobel Peace Prize and the economics award on Monday.

As always, the awards will be presented on Dec. 10, the anniversary of prize founder Alfred Nobel’s death in 1896.

TIME Crime

Police: Officer Fatally Shoots Man in St. Louis

Crowds confront police near the scene in in south St. Louis where a man was fatally shot by an off-duty St. Louis police officer on Oct. 8, 2014. St. Louis.
Crowds confront police near the scene in south St. Louis where a man was fatally shot by an off-duty St. Louis police officer on Oct. 8, 2014. David Carson—AP

(ST. LOUIS) — An off-duty police officer fatally shot an 18-year-old man who opened fire during a chase in south St. Louis, sparking loud protests in the area, police said Thursday.

St. Louis Police Chief Col. Sam Dotson said the 32-year-old officer was patrolling the Shaw neighborhood for a private security company late Wednesday when the shooting happened.

The officer said three men in the street ran away when they spotted him, Dotson told reporters at a news conference early Thursday. The way that one of the men ran — grabbing at his waistband, slightly lopsided — indicated that he was carrying a weapon, so the officer chased him, Dotson said.

The man approached the officer in an aggressive way, an altercation ensued and the man fired at the officer, the police chief said. The officer returned fire and killed him.

Ballistic evidence recovered from the scene indicates that the man fired three rounds at the officer before his weapon jammed, Dotson said, adding that the gun was also recovered.

The officer fired 17 shots, Dotson said. He said he didn’t know how many of those shots hit the suspect or why the officer fired that many shots. The officer was not injured.

“An investigation will decide if the officer’s behavior was appropriate,” he said at police headquarters.

People who described themselves as relatives of the dead man told The St. Louis Post Dispatch that he was not armed.

Dotson described the officer as a six-year veteran of the St. Louis Police Department, and said the man who was killed was 18 years old and black.

He did not name either man.

Hours after the shooting, a crowd gathered at the scene near the Missouri Botanical Garden. Some shouted “Hands up, don’t shoot” in reference to the fatal shooting in August of an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, by a white police officer in nearby Ferguson. That shooting led to weeks of sometimes violent unrest in the St. Louis suburb. Officer Darren Wilson has not been charged in the shooting.

Dotson said some in the crowd Wednesday night shouted obscenities at officers and damaged police cars, but that the officers “showed great restraint.”

He added: “Any police officer use of force certainly will draw attention.”

No demonstrators were arrested and by 1 a.m. Thursday the crowd had largely dispersed.

TIME Ukraine

Prosecutors: 1 MH17 Passenger Had Oxygen Mask On

A piece of debris of the fuselage at the crash site of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Grabovo, east of Donetsk, on July 25, 2014.
A piece of debris of the fuselage at the crash site of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Grabovo, east of Donetsk, on July 25, 2014. Bulent Kilic—AFP/Getty Images

(THE HAGUE, Netherlands) — Dutch prosecutors say the body of one passenger of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was found wearing an oxygen mask, raising questions about how much those on board knew about their fate when the plane plunged out of the sky above Eastern Ukraine in July.

Prosecution spokesman Wim de Bruin says the passenger, an Australian, did not have the mask on his face, but its elastic strap was around his neck.

De Bruin says it is not known “how or when the mask got around the victim’s neck.”

All 298 passengers and crew died when the jet flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur crashed July 17. Dutch investigators said last month it was likely struck by multiple “high-energy objects from outside the aircraft,” causing it to break up.

TIME Syria

New U.S.-Led Air Strikes Hit Besieged Syrian Town

(MURSITPINAR, Turkey) — The U.S.-led coalition pounded positions of the Islamic State group in the Syrian border town of Kobani on Thursday in some of the most intensive strikes in the air campaign so far, a Kurdish official and an activist group said.

But despite the airstrikes overnight and into the morning, the Islamic State fighters managed to capture a police station in the east of the town, said the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

The militants now control more than third of the strategic border town, added the Observatory, a group that tracks Syria’s civil war through a network of activists on the ground.

The fighting over Kobani has brought Syria’s civil war yet again to Turkey’s doorstep and allies have tried to press Ankara to take a more robust role in the U.S.-led coalition to fight the Islamic State group. There has also been criticism that Turkey has stood by idly with its tanks parked just across the frontier from the Syrian Kurdish town.

Responding to such criticism, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said Thursday that it was unrealistic to expect Turkey to launch a ground war against the Islamic State group on its own.

Cavusoglu spoke at a news conference in Ankara with visiting NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg, who said that there is no easy solution to push back the siege on Kobani.

“ISIL poses a grave threat to the Iraqi people, to the Syrian people, to the wider region, and to NATO nations,” Stoltenberg said, using an acronym for the Islamic State group. “So it is important that the whole international community stays united in this long-term effort.”

Cavusoglu said that Turkey is prepared to take on a bigger role once a deal is reached with the U.S.-led coalition. “Turkey will not hold back from carrying out its role,” he said.

Islamic State militants launched their offensive on Kobani in mid-September, capturing several nearby Kurdish villages and steadily tightening their noose around the town since then. The fighting has also forced at least 200,000 town residents and villagers from the area to flee across the frontier into Turkey.

However, Idriss Nassan, an official with Kobani’s Kurdish government, denied the militants were in control of a third of the town on Thursday.

He confirmed that the Kobani police station was taken by the Islamic State group but he said it was later destroyed in an airstrike. He said the Kurdish fighters managed to regain several other town areas on Thursday.

“I can confirm that they don’t control a third of the city. There is only a small part of Kobani under the control of Daesh,” said Nassan, using the Arabic acronym to refer to the Islamic State group.

Both Nassan and the Observatory said more than 20 airstrikes have been conducted in the area since Wednesday afternoon.

The Observatory’s chief, Rami Abdurrahman, said that more than 500 people have been killed in and around Kobani since the fighting began in September.

Also on Thursday, the Islamic State group brought reinforcements from their stronghold in the border town of Jarablous and the town of Manbij and Aleppo province, Abdurrahman said.

___

Butler reported from Istanbul. Associated Press writer Bassem Mroue in Beirut contributed to this report.

TIME

Green Day, Sting, Withers Among Rock Hall Nominees

Mike Dirnt, Billie Joe Armstrong and Tre Cool of Green Day pose backstage at the 2013 SXSW Music, Film + Interactive Festival at the Paramount Theatre on March 15, 2013 in Austin, Texas.
Mike Dirnt, Billie Joe Armstrong and Tre Cool of Green Day pose backstage at the 2013 SXSW Music, Film + Interactive Festival at the Paramount Theatre on March 15, 2013 in Austin, Texas. Michael Buckner—Getty Images for SXSW

(NEW YORK) — The punk trio Green Day, the short-lived British band The Smiths, “Lean on Me” singer Bill Withers and Sting are among the first-time nominees for enshrinement in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Six of the 15 nominees for the hall’s Class of 2015 announced Thursday are on the ballot for the first time. More than 700 artists and other members of the music community will vote on the inductees, with the results announced in December.

Other first-time nominees are the abrasive rockers Nine Inch Nails and the late blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan. To be eligible, a musician had to release a recording in 1989 or earlier.

With its ninth nomination since 2003, Chic is once again hoping for some good times. The Paul Butterfield Blues Band was nominated for the fourth time. New York rocker Lou Reed, who died last October, was nominated for the third time and the first since 2001.

Other nominees are Joan Jett and her band, the Blackhearts; German electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk; Motown’s The Marvelettes; the Los Angeles rap collective N.W.A.; Philly soul singers The Spinners and the rock and soul band War.

With “Dookie” and “American Idiot,” Green Day scored two of the biggest albums of the 1990s and 2000s. Withers, who hasn’t released new music in nearly three decades, had a string of 1970s era hits “Ain’t No Sunshine,” ”Just the Two of Us” and “Lovely Day.”

Sting is already in the rock hall as a member of The Police. The Smiths, a quartet led by the duo of singer-songwriter Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr, had an intense five-year run in the 1980s before crumbling. Nine Inch Nails’ signature hit, “Hurt,” was memorably covered by Johnny Cash.

The 2015 induction ceremony will be held in April in Cleveland, home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. Television plans have not been announced.

TIME Yemen

Yemen Prime Minister Designate Declines Post

Mideast Yemen
A Houthi Shi'ite rebel holds a weapon while on patrol following dawn prayers attended by supporters of the rebels on the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice, in Sanaa, Yemen, on Oct. 4, 2014 Hani Mohammed—AP

The Shi'ite rebels, known as Houthis, threatened a renewal of violence if Ahmed Awad bin Mubarak didn't step down

(SANAA, YEMEN) — Yemen’s Prime Minister designate asked the country’s president to relieve him from the new post after Shiite rebels rejected his nomination, the official news agency reported early Thursday.

The Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, had rejected President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi’s choice of a new prime minister, Ahmed Awad bin Mubarak, a 46-year-old businessman-turned-political figure, threatening to derail a U.N.-brokered peace deal.

The rebel leader called late Wednesday for new protests, just outside the presidential palace, threatening to renew the violence that left at least 140 people killed and left the rebels in control of the capital.

Yemen’s news agency SABA reported early Thursday that bin Mubarak asked Hadi to relieve him of the post to avoid further “split or disagreement” in the country.

On Wednesday night rebel leader Abdel-Malik al-Houthi delivered a televised statement calling on supporters to rally Thursday against the choice of bin Mubarak.

Al-Houthi said his group was surprised by the nomination, saying it came after Hadi met with the U.S. ambassador to Yemen. Al-Houthi called Hadi a “puppet” in the hands of foreign powers.

“Blatant foreign interference is a form of circumventing the popular revolution,” he said.

The Houthis took control of the capital last month, the same day that a U.N.-brokered deal was reached ending the standoff between the government and the rebels. The Houthis had protested for weeks demanding a better share in power and a change in government.

The deal called for the appointment of a new head of government, and for the Houthis to pull out of the city.

Bin Mubarak was the head of the president’s office. Previously, he had successfully led an effort by various political parties — including longtime rivals — to devise a political map for transition after a 2011 uprising in Yemen, the impoverished country on the Arabian Peninsula.

One of the youngest politicians in Yemen, bin Mubarak emerged during the uprising that forced longtime leader Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down in a U.S.-backed agreement. Saleh handed over to Hadi the next year but continued to yield significant power.

Yemen faces other challenges.

In addition to the Houthi rebels, an al-Qaida local branch is considered the world’s most dangerous branch.

On Wednesday, suspected al-Qaida militants carried out simultaneous attacks on a half-dozen Yemeni security and government offices in a province south of the capital Sanaa, setting off clashes that left at least 29 people dead, security officials said.

In a statement, the Interior Ministry said 14 troops and 15 assailants died in the attacks and ensuing clashes in central Baida province. Other security officials told The Associated Press that at least three civilians also were killed.

The ministry said the gunmen assaulted the province’s security headquarters, a special forces camp, an intelligence agency office and other government offices using car bombs. Troops fired back and thwarted the assailants’ attempt to take over the offices, it said.

The security officials who spoke to AP said the targets included a government communication office and an Education Ministry administrative building. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

The United States has been aiding the embattled Yemeni government in the fight against the militants, using drones to target al-Qaida operatives, their camps and hideouts across much of Yemen.

TIME stocks

US Stocks Have Their Best Day of 2014

A display board is seen on floor of the New York Stock Exchange during the afternoon of Oct. 8, 2014 in New York City.
A display board is seen on floor of the New York Stock Exchange during the afternoon of Oct. 8, 2014 in New York City. Andrew Burton—Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — Wall Street had its best day of the year.

The U.S. stock market surged on Wednesday, erasing a steep loss from the day before. Investors were reacting to minutes from the Federal Reserve’s latest policy meeting, which showed that the central bank wants to keep interest rates extremely low for the time being.

“There’s a lot of pressure on the Fed right now, so this was a big vote of confidence from investors,” said J.J. Kinahan, chief strategist at TD Ameritrade.

The Dow Jones jumped 274.83 points, or 1.6 percent, to 16,994.22. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index added 33.79 points, or 1.8 percent, to 1,968.89 and the Nasdaq composite rose 83.39 points, or 1.9 percent, to 4,468.59. All three indexes had their biggest point and percentage gains of 2014.

The jump was the latest whipsaw day for the stock market. Only the day before, the Dow plunged 273 points on fears that the global economy was slowing. Wednesday’s gains only made up for what investors lost on Tuesday.

Volatility has picked up sharply in U.S. stocks in recent days. Dow has had moves of 200 points or more five times in the last 10 days. There have only been 10 other days this year when the index has made moves of that magnitude.

Market watchers have been warning for some time now that the market was due to have more volatility, particularly with economic weakness developing in Europe and Asia and with the Federal Reserve on track to end a bond-buying stimulus program later this month. Analysts say investors should expect more big moves in coming weeks.

“I don’t think this is going to end until the Fed’s meeting in October,” said James Liu, a global market strategist at JPMorgan Funds. “The market is in a tug-of-war between the slowdown in international economies and the strong economic numbers here in the U.S.”

The stock market moved between gains and losses for most of the day, then surge in the last two hours of trading after the Fed released its minutes at 2:00 p.m. Eastern time.

Investors were encouraged by the language in the minutes of the Fed’s latest meeting, which signaled the central bank would only raise interest rates when measures of the economy’s health and inflation signaled the time was right, instead of using a specific date or period.

Investors like low interest rates since they keep the cost of borrowing inexpensive for businesses and individuals, encouraging spending and investment. The Fed also sees inflation remaining low for the next few years, another positive for most investors.

The U.S. economy has been a bright spot in an otherwise darkening picture for the global economy. The IMF cut its outlook for this year and next for global growth, citing weakness in Japan, Latin America and Europe. The IMF expects the global economy will grow 3.3 percent this year, slightly below what it forecast in July. Europe, in particular, has been weak. Germany said Tuesday that its industrial output fell 4 percent in August, far more than expected.

In contrast, reports like September jobs survey show the U.S. economy continuing to expand. Investors have become concerned that Europe’s weakness will eventually drag on the U.S. too.

“I think the U.S. economy could be protected from Europe for a quarter or two, but will start hurting us here eventually,” Kinahan said.

Investors now turn their attention to U.S. companies, who will start reporting their quarterly results en masse in the coming weeks.

Alcoa, the aluminum giant, reported its results after Wednesday’s closing bell, which came in much better than expectations. The Pittsburgh, Pa.-based company reported an adjusted third quarter profit of 31 cents a share, much more than the 21 cents analysts were looking for. Alcoa rose 32 cents, or 2 percent, to $16.39 in after-market trading.

In other company news, Sears Holdings, the parent company of Sears and K-mart, dropped $1.45, or 5 percent, to $28.85 following news reports that the company’s vendors have started to halt shipments to the retailer. Sears has struggled for several months and has been selling off assets to raise cash to pay for its expenses.

Gap plunged $3.57, or 8.5 percent, to $38.40 in after-market trading after the company announce its CEO Glenn Murphy was stepping down early next year.

In other markets, the price of oil fell to its lowest level in 18 months on lower global demand and high supplies. Benchmark U.S. crude fell $1.54 to close at $87.31 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils used by many U.S. refineries, fell 73 cents to close at $91.38 on the ICE Futures exchange in London.

In other energy futures trading on the NYMEX, wholesale gasoline fell 5 cents to close at $2.318 a gallon, heating oil fell 3.1 cents to close at $2.576 a gallon and natural gas fell 10.2 cents to close at $3.855 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In metals trading, the price of gold fell $6.40 to $1,206 an ounce. Silver fell 18 cents to $17.06 an ounce and copper fell four cents to $3 a pound.

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