TIME Yemen

A 5-Day Humanitarian Cease-Fire Has Begun in Yemen

Mideast Yemen Saudi
Hani Mohammed—AP Fire and smoke rises after a Saudi air strike in Sanaa, Yemen on July 13, 2015

Security officials said the situation on the ground has quieted

(SANAA, Yemen) — Saudi-led coalition airstrikes came to a halt in Yemen early Monday after a five-day humanitarian truce went into effect, witnesses and security officials said.

However, ground fighting broke out almost immediately in the restive city of Taiz following random shelling by Shiite Houthi rebels in three neighborhoods, they said.

Security officials said ground fighting has also erupted in Marib province and in the area surrounding the strategic al-Anad military base in Lahj province.

Random shelling by Houthis and their allies hit northern and western areas of the port city of Aden after the cease fire, security officials and witnesses said.

The Saudi-led and U.S.-backed coalition of mainly Gulf Arab countries has been waging an air campaign since March against the Iran-supported rebels, who control most of northern Yemen and the capital, Sanaa.

The pause declared by the Saudi-led coalition began at 11:59 p.m. (2059 GMT, 4:59 p.m. EDT) Sunday. It is intended to help allow humanitarian aid to be delivered to ease the suffering of civilians in the Arab world’s poorest country.

The coalition made the unexpected announcement about the humanitarian pause on Saturday. The statement, carried on Saudi state media, said the coalition will cease military operations, but that it will respond should Houthi rebels or their allies conduct any military actions or movements.

The rebels, known as Houthis, have expressed doubt over the truce. One Houthi official said it will likely mark “the beginning of a new war.” Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi, the head of the Houthi’s Revolutionary Council, said Sunday that the group had not received official notification of the truce from the United Nations.

Two previous humanitarian truces in Yemen did not hold.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed the coalition’s announcement of the cease-fire and urged the Houthis and other parties to suspend military operations and “maintain the humanitarian pause for the sake of all the Yemeni people,” Ban’s spokesman said. Ban also urged all sides “to facilitate the delivery of humanitarian assistance to all parts of Yemen.”

Earlier on Sunday, Saudi-backed Yemeni troops and their allies clashed with Houthi rebels in a strategic town north of the port city of Aden, security and military officials from both sides of the conflict said.

The pro-government fighters had withdrawn from the town of Sabr earlier in the day after fierce battles with the Houthis. They returned hours later following the arrival of military reinforcements and wrested control of a large portion of the town, security officials said.

The officials said five pro-government fighters were killed and 15 wounded in the battle. Local medical officials said eight rebels were killed and 20 wounded.

The running battles in Sabr, which is on a key supply route, have lasted for more than a day after troops stormed it in their push north from Aden toward the strategic military base of Al-Anad, which is held by the rebels.

Security officials and residents of Sabr said the situation on the ground has quieted after the cease-fire took effect.

The Yemeni troops fighting in Sabr had been training since April in military camps in al-Buraiqeh, the port city west of Aden, military officials from the Saudi-led coalition said. Saudi, Emirati, Egyptian and Jordanian military advisers there have set up the camps and trained hundreds of fighters, they added.

The fighters also received over 300 armored personnel carriers from the United Arab Emirates by sea. These sophisticated carriers are largely driven by non-Yemenis, the military officials said. Two Emirati officers have been killed in battle in Yemen since the Saudi-led coalition’s latest offensive, known as the “Golden Arrow,” started on July 16.

Al-Buraiqeh is also home to the Yemeni Fourth Military Base, which is in charge of all military operations in Aden.

The foreign military advisers, officials said, arrived in al-Buraiqeh by sea more than a month ago and serve as intermediaries between the Yemeni troops and the coalition leadership in neighboring Saudi Arabia. They also supervise the distribution of weapons and give coordinates for coalition airstrikes, military officials said.

All the officials spoke anonymously because they are not authorized to brief reporters.

TIME Automakers

Fiat Chrysler Fined Record $105 Million Over Recalls

The company will also be forced to buy back recalled Jeeps

Fiat Chrysler could be required to lay out hundreds of millions of dollars to get potentially defective Ram pickups and older Jeeps off the road under a deal with safety regulators to settle claims that the automaker mishandled nearly two dozen recalls.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is requiring the company to offer to buy back certain Ram pickup trucks and Dodge and Chrysler SUVs with defective steering parts that can cause drivers to lose control. More than 579,000 vehicles were initially recalled in 2013, but the company would only be required to buy back a third of those because many of the pickups have already been repaired.

The Italian-American automaker must also allow owners of more than a million older Jeeps with vulnerable rear-mounted gas tanks to trade them in at above market value or give them $100 as an incentive to get a repair.

Fiat Chrysler also faces a record civil penalty of up to $105 million. That beats the old record of $70 million assessed against Honda Motor Co. for lapses in reporting deaths and injuries to safety regulators. FCA’s fine includes $70 million in penalties, at least $20 million to meet performance requirements and $15 million if an independent recall monitor finds any further violations.

Fiat Chrysler shares traded in the New York Stock Exchange dropped nearly 5 percent to close at $14.41 Monday following the weekend announcement of the deal.

The settlement is the latest sign that auto safety regulators are taking a more aggressive approach toward companies that fail to disclose defects or don’t properly conduct a recall.

“Merely identifying defects is not enough,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said Monday during a conference call with media. “Manufacturers that fail in their duty to fix these defects will pay a price.”

Nearly 1.3 million Rams, Chrysler Aspen and Dodge Durango SUVs and Dodge Dakota pickups from as far back as the 2003 model year were recalled for the steering problem in 2013. The government excluded around 700,000 of the oldest models from the buyback program because most have already been repaired or are no longer on the road.

But it ordered the buyback for up to 579,000 vehicles from the 2008 through 2012 model years. Of those, around 193,000 have not gotten the recall repairs and are eligible for either a repair or a buyback, according to recall reports submitted to the government by Fiat Chrysler.

In each case, Fiat Chrysler would be required to pay the original purchase price plus 10 percent, minus a certain amount for depreciation.

The ultimate cost of the settlement depends on how many pickup and SUV owners join in. According to Kelly Blue Book, a 2010 Dodge Ram 1500 — one of the smaller, less-expensive trucks involved in the recalls — could fetch $20,000 in a dealer trade-in, assuming the truck has 60,000 miles on it and is in “good” condition. At that rate, FCA could spend $956 million to buy back one-quarter of the vehicles at issue. The company is allowed to repair and resell the trucks it buys back.

The government knows of at least one death attributed to the steering defect.

The older Jeeps have fuel tanks located behind the rear axle, with little to shield them in a rear crash. They can rupture and spill gasoline, causing a fire. At least 75 people have died in crash-related fires, although Fiat Chrysler maintains they are as safe as comparable vehicles from the same era.

FCA must offer $100 to Jeep owners as an incentive to get a repair or a trade-in incentive of $1,000 toward the purchase of another Fiat Chrysler vehicle. The repair consists of adding a trailer hitch to the Jeeps. FCA has already repaired around 441,000 of the 1.5 million Jeeps recalled.

The Jeep trade-ins could add to the tab, but they also could generate more new vehicle sales by getting customers into showrooms. Still, the total could strain the parent company, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV. The company posted a first-quarter net profit of $101 million and had more than $20 billion in cash and securities on March 31.

FCA said the amount it pays to repurchase vehicles will be applied as a credit to the $20 million it agreed to spend on outreach efforts as part of its $105 million fine.

“FCA U.S. does not expect that the net cost of providing these additional alternatives will be material to its financial position, liquidity or results of operations,” the company said Monday.

Both the Jeep and Ram measures are part of a larger settlement between the government and the automaker over allegations of misconduct in 23 recalls covering more than 11 million vehicles. Besides the civil penalty, Fiat Chrysler agreed to an independent recall monitor and strict federal oversight.

TIME Turkey

Turkey Calls For NATO Meeting to Discuss Security Threats

Mevlut Cavusoglu
Burhan Ozbilici—AP Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu speaks to the media in Ankara, about latest airstrikes against Islamic State group forces and Kurdish rebel bases, on July 25, 2015.

Turkey recently agreed to let the U.S. launch anti-ISIS attacks from a military base in the country

(ANKARA, Turkey)—Turkey on Sunday called for a meeting of its NATO allies to discuss threats to its security and its airstrikes targeting Islamic State militants in Syria and Kurdish rebels in Iraq.

The move came as Turkey’s state-run media reported that Turkish F-16 jets again took off from the country’s southeastern Diyarbakir air base to hit Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK targets across the border in northern Iraq.

There was no immediate confirmation of the report by TRT television, which came hours after authorities said PKK militants detonated a car-bomb near Diyarbakir, killing two soldiers and wounding four others.

NATO announced that its decision-making body, the North Atlantic Council, will convene Tuesday after Ankara invoked the alliance’s Article 4, which allows member states to request a meeting if they feel their territorial integrity or security is under threat.

The Turkish Foreign Ministry said Turkey would inform allies about the airstrikes which followed an IS suicide bombing near Turkey’s border with Syria that left 32 people dead, and an IS attack on Turkish forces, which killed a soldier.

Turkey requested the meeting, which includes ambassadors of all 28 member countries, “in view of the seriousness of the situation after the heinous terrorist attacks in recent days,” NATO said.

NATO itself is not involved in operations against the Islamic State group, although many of its members are. As an alliance, however, NATO is committed to helping defend Turkey.

Turkey has simultaneously bombed Islamic State group positions near its border with Syria and Kurdish insurgents in northern Iraq. It has also carried out widespread police operations against suspected Kurdish and IS militants and other outlawed groups inside Turkey. Hundreds of people have been detained.

Tensions flared with the Kurds following the IS suicide bombing, as Kurdish groups blamed the government for not doing enough to prevent IS operations. On Wednesday, PKK claimed responsibility for the killing of two policemen in the Kurdish majority city of Sanliurfa.

PKK has said Turkey’s airstrikes likely spell the end of a cease-fire announced in 2013.

The PKK has fought Turkey for autonomy for Kurds in a conflict that has claimed tens of thousands of lives since 1984. The Kurds are an ethnic group with their own language living in a region spanning present-day Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Armenia.

The car bomb exploded on a road in the town of Lice as a vehicle carrying military police officers was traveling to intervene against Kurds who had blocked a main intersection and set cars on fire. The military said a large-scale operation was underway to capture the attackers.

The European Union’s foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, expressed support for Turkey’s efforts against terrorism, including the IS group, in a telephone conversation with Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu but also urged Turkey to keep the peace process with the Kurds “alive and on track.”

Similarly, the German government said Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke by phone Sunday with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and assured him of “Germany’s solidarity and support in the fight against terrorism.”

She also “appealed not to give up the peace process with the Kurds, but to stick to it despite all the difficulties,” a government statement said.

A statement from Davutoglu’s office said the Turkish leader for his part, told Merkel that Turkey would take all measures needed to fight terrorism and would resume cross border raids when deemed necessary while continuing “to take steps toward a (Kurdish) settlement and democratization.”

Late Saturday, the White House said Turkey has the right to defend itself against attacks by Kurdish rebels. Spokesman Alistair Baskey strongly condemned recent attacks by the PKK, which the U.S. has designated a terrorist group, and said the PKK should renounce terrorism and resume talks with Turkey’s government.

But Baskey also said both sides should avoid violence and pursue de-escalation.

Authorities banned a peace rally, scheduled for Sunday in Istanbul to denounce this week’s suicide bombing, on grounds that it may be used by outlawed groups for “provocative” acts. Organizers instead read out a brief statement to a crowd of some 1,000 who dispersed peacefully.

In another Istanbul neighborhood, police clashed with demonstrators protesting the death Friday of a woman suspected of being a member of the outlawed leftist DHKP-C. Officials said the woman was killed in a gunbattle with police during the government crackdown on terror groups.

Protesters hurled bottles, rocks and firebombs at police and a policeman died in hospital after being shot as he entered a building to arrest some of the demonstrators, the state-run Anadolu Agency reported.

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Associated Press writers John-Thor Dahlburg in Brussels, Geir Moulson in Berlin and Josh Lederman and Darlene Superville in Washington contributed to this report.

TIME Reproductive Health

Planned Parenthood Says It Doesn’t Profit From Fetal Organs

Cecile Richards planned parenthood
Robert F. Bukaty—AP In this Oct. 3, 2014, file photo, Cecile Richards, Planned Parenthood president, speaks in Orono, Maine.

The group's president said it has done nothing illegal and is the target of a political smear campaign

(WASHINGTON) — The president of Planned Parenthood said her organization’s clinics never adjust the abortion procedure to better preserve fetal organs for medical research and that the organization’s charges cover only the cost of transmission to researchers.

Planned Parenthood has come under congressional scrutiny after the release of two stealthily recorded videos that showed officials discussing how they provide aborted fetal organs for research. Abortion opponents say the videos show the organization is illegally harvesting and selling organs. Three congressional committees are making inquiries.

Planned Parenthood’s president, Cecile Richards, said Sunday the group has done nothing illegal and is the target of a political smear campaign.

“I stand behind the health care that we provide at Planned Parenthood. Women trust Planned Parenthood,” Richards said. “And I look forward to anyone who wants to look into our policies and procedures.”

Richards appeared on ABC’s “This Week.” It was her first Sunday talk show appearance since a group called the Center for Medical Progress released two videos secretly recorded in 2014 and 2015 by people posing as buyers of fetal tissue. The videos were part of longer discussions, and Richards said the longer videos showed doctors repeatedly saying that Planned Parenthood does not profit from the tissue donations.

In the videos, Planned Parenthood officials discuss the amounts the group charges to provide the organs and the abortion procedures used to obtain the organs. The officials, Richards said, were reprimanded for the tone they used. She also called those who released the video “nothing but militant anti-abortion extremists.”

David Daleiden of the Center for Medical Progress issued a statement saying Planned Parenthood will attack him and his organization, but that does not change what he said the investigation uncovered, “an enterprise-wide operation that traffics and sells baby parts.” He told ABC that 10 to 12 more tapes would be released.

Richards said fetal organ donation takes place in a handful of states and that the tissue goes toward medical research.

“This is actually laudable, that women and their families choose to make fetal tissue donations in order to potentially save the lives of other folks,” Richards said.

 

TIME France

Chris Froome Wins 2nd Tour de France

This was his second win in three years

(PARIS)—Resplendent in yellow and riding a canary yellow bike, Chris Froome has won his second Tour de France in three years, with a leisurely pedal into Paris to wrap up a spectacular three-week slog of furious racing that culminated with a thrilling late fight-back by the British rider’s toughest rival, Colombian Nairo Quintana.

Cheered on the Champs-Elysees under suitably rainy skies for Britain’s third win in the 112-year-old race, Froome took it easy on the last Stage 21, his work done having grimly resisted Quintana’s last-ditch assault on his hard-won Tour lead on Saturday on the final Alpine ascent.

Just as when Froome first won in 2013, Quintana is again runner-up, although the margin is much smaller this time. Froome and his teammates crossed the finish line together in a line, arms across each other’s shoulders, with Froome grinning in the middle.

TIME Iraq

Iraqi Forces Retake University From ISIS

Mideast Iraq United States anbar
AP In this Thursday, July, 23, 2015 photo, Iraqi Army soldiers patrol with new U.S.-made weapons and armored vehicles in an eastern suburb of Ramadi, backed by Shiite and Sunni pro-government fighters and U.S.-led coalition airstrikes against Islamic State group positions in Anbar province, Iraq.

The battle was part of its push to reclaim territory across the Anbar province

(BAGHDAD)—Iraqi government forces recaptured Anbar University from the Islamic State militant group Sunday after hours of fierce clashes, provincial officials said, as part of its push to reclaim territory across the embattled province.

The university, located 5 kilometers (3 miles) south of Anbar’s provincial capital, the militant-held city of Ramadi, was under the full control of government forces, which had entered the complex early Sunday amid intense combat with the militant group.

Athal al-Fahdawi, a provincial councilman said a number of buildings in and around the university complex have been badly damaged or destroyed, but that the militants retreated. Another Anbar councilman, Faleh al-Issawi, told The Associated Press that about two dozen Islamic State fighters were killed in the clashes. He declined to provide more details.

The Iraqi military launched a large-scale operation this month to retake Anbar province, in which most of the biggest cities are held by the Islamic State group. The loss of Ramadi in mid-May recalled the collapse of Iraqi security forces last summer in the face of the Islamic State group’s blitz into Iraq that saw it capture a third of the country, where it has declared an Islamic caliphate.

A U.S.-led coalition has launched more than 3,000 airstrikes in Iraq, many of them in Anbar province. The fall of Ramadi was the latest defeat on the ground calling into question the Obama administration’s hopes of relying solely on airstrikes to support the Iraqi forces in expelling the extremists.

Government-backed forces, which include the Iraqi military, Shiite militias and Sunni tribes, are also currently assembling around the militant-held city of Fallujah, which was the first major city in Iraq to fall to the militant group in early 2014.

Troubles first began for Anbar University in June 2014 when militants stormed the campus, briefly taking students hostage before withdrawing from the school amid gunfire. Ramadi was long under the protection of the local tribes and government-backed forces, which managed to hold on to the city longer than most others in the province.

—————-

Yacoub reported from Amman, Jordan.

TIME movies

Ant-Man Beats Pixels at Weekend Box Office

antman paul rudd
Zade Rosenthal—Marvel

The Marvel superhero movie brought in $24.8 million over the weekend

(LOS ANGELES)—”Ant-Man” has claimed first place at the box office for the second weekend in a row, narrowly besting new opener “Pixels.” The Marvel and Disney superhero pic brought in $24.8 million over the weekend, bringing its domestic total to $106.1 million according to Rentrak estimates Sunday.

The Adam Sandler end of the world comedy “Pixels” earned an estimated $24 million in its debut weekend. It’s a fairly weak start for the PG-13 rated film, which cost $88 million to produce.

Meanwhile, the R-rated boxing drama “Southpaw” surpassed expectations, earning $16.5 million out of the gates and beating out the YA adaptation “Paper Towns,” which earned about $12.5 million — a far cry from the $48 million debut of “The Fault in Our Stars” last year.

TIME Somalia

Suicide Truck Bomber Kills 8 at Somali Hotel

Somalia Attack car bomb hotel
AP A Somali soldier observes the scene of a car bomb attack in Mogadishu, Somalia on June 21, 2015.

The terrorist group Al-Shabab claimed responsibility for the attack

(MOGADISHU, Somalia)—A suicide bomber rammed a truck rigged with explosives into the blast walls around one of Mogadishu’s most secure hotels, severely damaging the building and killing eight people, said police Capt. Mohammed Hussein.

The attack was claimed by the al-Qaida-linked Al-Shabab group and also wounded 20 people. The walled, luxury Jazeera Hotel is considered the most secure in Somalia’s capital and is frequented by diplomats, foreigners and visiting heads of state.

“This is really scary — destroying the Jazeera hotel like this means no blast walls can make anyone safe,” said bystander Yusuf Mohammed. The use of huge truck bombs is a relatively new phenomenon and throws into doubt whether any place in the capital is now adequately protected.

While blast destroyed at least eight rooms and stunned the residents of the Somali capital, it wasn’t as bad as it might have been because the truck, which contained a ton of explosives, was stopped at the blast walls outside the hotel.

“The damage is big but a lot less because the truck bomb couldn’t go beyond the walls that lay a few meters from the hotel’s perimeter walls,” said Mohammed Abdi, a police officer.

Nervous soldiers fired in the air to disperse a crowd who surged toward the hotel after the blast as medical workers transported wounded victims into awaiting ambulances.

The attack comes as Somali forces backed by troops from the African Union have launched an offensive, dubbed Operation Jubba Corridor, to push al-Shabab out of its last strongholds. The coalition already has driven the group out of the capital.

In a statement, Al-Shabab said the attack was in retaliation for the deaths of dozens of civilians at the hands of Ethiopian forces, which are part of the AU force, and that the hotel was targeted because it hosts “Western” embassies coordinating the offensive.

The attack came as President Barack Obama was leaving neighboring Kenya for Ethiopia. The president’s visit has included discussions about how to deal with the threat of al-Shabab.

 

TIME Turkey

Car Bomb Kills 2 Soldiers in Turkey

Mevlut Cavusoglu turkey airstrikes
Burhan Ozbilici—AP Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu speaks to the media in Ankara on July 25, 2015, about the latest airstrikes against Islamic State group forces and Kurdish rebel bases.

The attack was in a largely Kurdish part of the country

(ANKARA, Turkey) — A car bomb struck a military vehicle in southeast Turkey, killing two soldiers and wounding four others in an attack blamed on Kurdish rebels, authorities said Sunday, a day after Turkey launched airstrikes against Kurdish insurgents in northern Iraq.

The Kurdish rebel group, the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, has said the airstrikes likely spelled the end of a cease-fire announced in 2013. Turkey has simultaneously bombed Islamic State positions near the Turkish border in Syria and carried out widespread police operations against suspected Kurdish and IS militants and other outlawed groups inside Turkey. Hundreds of people have been detained.

The private Dogan news agency said that Turkish artillery based near the southeastern border town of Semdinli shelled PKK targets across the frontier in northern Iraq for three hours early Sunday. There was no official confirmation of the report.

The car bomb exploded late Saturday on a road in the town of Lice as a vehicle carrying military police officers was traveling to intervene against Kurds who had blocked a main intersection and set cars on fire, said the governor’s office in Diyarbakir, a mainly Kurdish province.

The military said the PKK militants also detonated a roadside bomb and fired on the troops in the attack it called a “treacherously pre-planned” ambush. The military statement said a large-scale operation was underway to capture the attackers.

Assailants also opened fire at police stations in the southeastern cities of Diyarbakir, Siirt and Mardin, Turkish media reported. No one was injured in the attacks.

The PKK has fought Turkey for autonomy for Kurds in a conflict that has claimed tens of thousands of lives since 1984.

On Saturday, Turkish fighter jets struck Kurdish rebel shelters and storage facilities across the border in northern Iraq, its first such strikes since the peace process with the Kurds was launched in 2012. A cease-fire was announced the following year.

Tensions have been flaring with the Kurds in recent days following an IS suicide bombing in a town near the border with Syria. Kurdish groups have blamed the government for not doing enough to prevent IS operations. On Wednesday, the PKK claimed responsibility for the killing of two policemen in the Kurdish majority city of Sanliurfa.

Late Saturday, the White House said Turkey has the right to defend itself against attacks by Kurdish rebels. Spokesman Alistair Baskey strongly condemned recent attacks by the PKK, which the U.S. has designated a terrorist group, and said the PKK should renounce terrorism and resume talks with Turkey’s government.

But Baskey also said both sides should avoid violence and pursue de-escalation.

Meanwhile, a deputy national security adviser to President Barack Obama, said Sunday that Washington welcomed Turkey’s “increased focus and accelerated efforts” against IS militants.

Authorities banned a peace rally, scheduled for Sunday in Istanbul to denounce this week’s suicide bombing, on grounds that it may be used by outlawed groups for “provocative” acts. Organizers canceled the rally and said they would read out a brief statement instead.

In another Istanbul neighborhood, police clashed with demonstrators protesting the death Friday of a woman suspected of being a member of the outlawed leftist DHKP-C. Protesters hurled bottles, rocks and firebombs at police. Officials said the woman was killed in a gunbattle with police during the government crackdown on terror groups.

___

Associated Press writers Josh Lederman and Darlene Superville in Washington contributed to this report.

TIME France

Paris Police Open Fire at Car at Tour de France Barricades

tour de france police paris
Mike Egerton—AP Police on the Champs-Elysees in Paris where the final stage of the Tour de France is due to finish on July 26, 2015.

Police are still looking for the car's occupants

(PARIS)—Paris police officers opened fire on a car that tried to crash through barricades about eight hours before the final arrival of the Tour de France cycling race on Sunday, a police official said.

The car escaped with its two occupants apparently unharmed after coming under fire around 11 a.m. in the Place de la Concorde, where the cyclists make their final triumphant rounds to conclude the race, said Luc Poignant, a spokesman with the SGP police union. Police are hunting for the people in the car.

Tour de France race director Thierry Gouvenou said that he didn’t have much information about the incident, but he didn’t foresee any impact on the race.

The final stage of the Tour de France is due to begin at 4:35 p.m., leaving from Sevres, a town southwest of Paris. The riders are then due to arrive in the French capital at around 5:30 p.m. and do 10 laps around the Champs-Elysees before finishing at Place de la Concorde at about 7 p.m.

Hundreds of thousands of people gather in the Place de la Concorde and the Champs Elysees for the race’s final leg.

Poignant said officers were finishing setting up the barricades for the race when the car tried to crash through the barriers. Officers opened fire on the car, which ultimately drove away. Poignant told the BFM television network that no officers were injured.

 

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