By Eric Barker
May 5, 2014

I’ve posted about how people at the top of their field are relentlessly productive.

But you can’t sprint for miles. There’s plenty of research showing that being a touch lazy might be beneficial at times.

Here are six research-backed ways to get more done in less time by taking it easy.

1) Work Less

Working too hard for too long makes you less productive.

Yes, pulling 60-hour weeks is impressive.

But pull them for more than 2 months and you accomplish less than if you had only been working 40-hour weeks.

Via Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much:

(The best system for time management is here.)

2) Go Home

If you’re doing creative work, research says you’ll be more productive at home than in the office:

(More on what boosts creativity here.)

3) Take A Nap

Naps rejuvenate you and increase learning. Some of the most successful people of all time were dedicated nappers.

Via Daniel Coyle’s The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills:

What you can learn about good sleep from astronauts is here.

4) Procrastinate

Yes, that’s right, procrastination can be a good thing.

Dr. John Perry, author of The Art of Procrastination, explains a good method for leveraging your laziness:

A similar tip is described by Piers Steel, author of The Procrastination Equation:

Dr. Steel says it’s based on sound principles of behavioral psychology:

(Here’s more on “positive procrastination.”)

5) Go On Vacation

For up to a month after a vacation you’re more productive at work:

(Here’s how to improve your vacations.)

6) Hang Out With Friends

Easily distracted? Having friends around can make you more productive, even if they’re not helping you.

Via Friendfluence: The Surprising Ways Friends Make Us Who We Are:

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Related posts:

Productivity Ninja: 5 Powerful Tips For Getting More Stuff Done

Stay Focused: 5 Ways To Increase Your Attention Span

Work Smarter Not Harder: 17 Great Tips

This piece originally appeared onBarking Up the Wrong Tree.

Contact us at editors@time.com.

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