TIME Crime

Prep-School Grads Accused of Running Drug Ring

This photo shows drugs, money, guns and other illegal items that were seized when Lower Merion Police broke up a drug distribution ring during a new conference in Montgomery County, Pa, Monday, April 21, 2014.
Drugs, guns and other illegal items were seized when Lower Merion Police broke up a drug-distribution ring in Montgomery County, Pa. Clem Murray—The Philadelphia Inquirer/AP

Two former students of the expensive all-boys Haverford School allegedly used their lacrosse contacts to recruit buyers and sellers in a business that peddled cocaine, marijuana, ecstasy and hash oil in an affluent Philadelphia suburb

Welcome to high school. Two prep-school graduates are being accused of establishing a teen drug ring in the affluent Main Line suburbs of Philadelphia. On Monday, prosecutors filed charges against Neil Scott, 25, and Timothy Brooks, 18, the leaders of the so-called drug monopoly.

The two former students of the Haverford School, a $35,000-a-year all-boys preparatory school in Pennsylvania, allegedly used their lacrosse-team connections to establish a five-school drug enterprise, selling ecstasy, marijuana, cocaine and hash oil to students, the Associated Press reports. Dubbed the “Main Line Take Over Project,” the ring allegedly had marijuana shipped from California and recruited local teens to sell the drugs.

Authorities seized about 3.6 kg (8 lb.) of marijuana, a loaded assault weapon, two guns, over $11,000 and equipment to manufacture hash oil. Scott reportedly began selling weed when he returned to the area from San Diego last year. He told police a connection from California supplied the pot that he said would “sell very well on the Main Line because everyone between 15 and 55 loves good weed.”

[AP]

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