TIME Video Games

Xbox Owners Can Finally ‘GoPro’ and Upload Game Clips to YouTube

Microsoft

Xbox One owners finally get YouTube uploads, Xbox 360 owners get an extreme-sports-angled camera partnership.

Let’s be clear: GoPro is not a verb…unless I’m using it in a title, in which case it is, just this once, I promise. It’s also a brand of rugged high-def cameras that get people to say stuff like “extreme” and “sports” a lot. And as of tomorrow, it’ll be an official app that lives on your Xbox 360 (Microsoft says the Xbox One version’s coming sometime this summer).

According to Xbox Wire, the GoPro app is meant to stream some of that “extreme” content to your Xbox 360, browsing “a variety of categories including sports, athletes and adventure, and watch individual videos or view back-to-back videos within a category.” You’ll need Microsoft’s $60 a year Xbox Live Gold subscription to access it, and you’ll also have the option to buy GoPro cameras and accessories — handled by Microsoft’s online store — directly through the app. Microsoft reminds us this is the first time it’s bundled physical purchases with an Xbox app, so think of it as the company’s canary in its Xbox-meets-Amazon mine.

But the news you’re probably reading this for, is that Microsoft’s finally adding YouTube support to its Game DVR and Upload functions on the Xbox One (and yes, no surprise, Xbox Live is required). According to Microsoft:

Now, use Game DVR to capture epic gaming moments, edit them in Upload Studio, and, with the simple click of a button inside the YouTube app (look for My Uploads), share them instantly to your YouTube channel. The updated YouTube experience also allows you to watch YouTube videos in Snap Mode, add individual YouTube videos to your Pins, earn Media Achievements, and add your YouTube channels to OneGuide for instant access to YouTube videos right next to your favorite TV listings or App Channels.

How much this matters probably depends on how much you’re already streaming game sessions to Twitch, which launched (late — the PS4’s had it since launch in November) on Xbox One in early March. Twitch has somewhere in the vicinity of 45 million viewers a month, compared with YouTube’s monthly one billion. But then Twitch is a broadcast service, while YouTube’s a clip-sharing one, so there’s plenty of reason to use both.

 

MORE: The History of Video Game Consoles – Full

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