WASHINGTON, USA - JANUARY 20: President Donald Trump waves to the crowds during the 58th U.S. Presidential Inauguration after he was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States of America in Washington, USA on January 20, 2017.
Anadolu Agency—Getty Images
By Stacey Griffith
January 23, 2017

This political season has been hard on a lot of us. The mood in the camp has been very dim, and now with President Trump settled in the White House, I want to lighten it up, somehow, someway, by giving you some feel-good things to think about and do during the next four (potentially disorienting) years.

President Obama always made us bathe in the hope that our country was changing for the better. As a non-political person and a person who was never the best student in history, I learned many things from our last president. The next administration will likely bring challenges, but I actually do think there will be something to be learned.

One of the things about times of change is that they create the need to have deeper and perhaps uncomfortable conversations at the dinner table, where you find yourself discussing topics on which you may not be well versed. You may be shy about sharing your own point of view, but it’s actually a great way for you to feel better. The emotions you’re feeling need somewhere to land — in the hands of friends who care enough to listen, around a table where you feel confident no one will judge you and your views will be respected. Which leads me to my first piece of advice: Surround yourself with a crew that makes you feel safe, but be cautious about speaking in a hateful way. We cannot hate. The only way we’ll get through this is if we band together.

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Second: Prioritize your health. Find a group exercise class led by a kind but powerful instructor. This could be as easy as a walking club that meets in a mall or as challenging as a SoulCycle class lead by a kick-ass teacher. Whatever form it takes, fitness is medicine. Research has shown that exercise improves stamina, decreases signs of depression and improves overall health. What’s more: if you take the time to get to know the people in the class, you will form friendships, hold yourself accountable to showing up the following day and find a sense of belonging within your community.

Finally, during this transition period, it’s important to watch what you eat. Make sure you don’t let your emotions lead to making horrible food choices. Your body and your mind need to be in sync. Be sure to eat clean and avoid too much sugar. I’m not a nutritionist — I only share what works for me, and you should always consult your doctor before changing your diet — but a no-sugar, low-carb, high-protein diet has been the greatest thing I have ever done for myself.

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Let’s make sure that we stay positive, we talk about our feelings with our friends without hate in our voices, we keep moving, we eat smart and we make the best of these next four years. You in?

Stacey Griffith is a senior master instructor at SoulCycle and the author of the upcoming book Two Turns From Zero. Stacey’s motivational coaching style combines a passion for dance, athleticism and mind-blowing music—all set to the beat of her voice. Follow her on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

MOTTO hosts provocative voices and influencers from various spheres. We welcome outside contributions. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of our editors.

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