Max Brown, 25, from New York City: “The single most important issue for me is obviously the way that Donald Trump has talked about women in the past," he told me. "So as a man I’m here in solidarity with women. I’m also thinking about the climate because Donald Trump doesn’t really care at all about the environment, which impacts everybody.”
Max Brown, 25, from New York City: “The single most important issue for me is obviously the way that Donald Trump has talked about women in the past," he told me. "So as a man I’m here in solidarity with women. I’m also thinking about the climate because Donald Trump doesn’t really care at all about the environment, which impacts everybody.”Ruddy Roye for TIME
Max Brown, 25, from New York City: “The single most important issue for me is obviously the way that Donald Trump has talked about women in the past," he told me. "So as a man I’m here in solidarity with women. I’m also thinking about the climate because Donald Trump doesn’t really care at all about the environment, which impacts everybody.”
John Stice, 39, from Albuquerque: "I came here really to support my wife and to be a part of the movement—the movement of my generation."
Madmax, right, 22 from New York City, with Chaske, 29, from Minneapolis. Both came to Washington to shed light on the situation in Standing Rock: "People like me are being arrested and charged for felonies that we don't deserve. I was charged for two felonies, reckless endangerment and criminal mischief," Madmax told me. Chaske added: "I came to support 'Sioux Z Dezbah' [a water protector who was injured in one eye] and all that she is doing to highlight our plight. I am here to support the women and to watch their backs."
Tom Chalkley, 61, a Baltimore native: "I had to march. This is a perfectly timed protest against a national and a global disaster."
Andrew ("Woods"), 27, is a D.C. resident: "I came here to march against a toxic masculinity and years of misogyny. After all, I got six sisters. I had to do this."
Bob White, 78, from Arnold, Maryland: “I’m here to support something positive. It’s not intended to be a march of negativity but a march for the positive things that people are going to make sure are part of our future," he told me. "I’m here with my daughter, wife and friends. We’re enjoying the fact that people are coming together to hopefully have the first day of a good future.”
Mohammad Suaidi and Dan Meyer are the proud parents of Johan, who is six months old. "We came here because we wanted to demonstrate to our son that he is a part of a larger community made of both men and women," Mohammad told me. "This is his community. This is the community that will give him support. This is why we are here and this is why we are involved in this march. We wanted him to see that we have been fighting for his rights from the beginning."
Stefan Weiner, 25, from Brooklyn: "I'm here marching in solidarity with anyone that feels oppressed by Trump."
Adam, 26, from Pennsylvania: "I just wanted to come show support for all women in my life, LGBT, immigrants, black people and anyone who is about to have a really tough four years because of this administration."
Anthony Sykas, 31, from Florida: "I really wanted there to be the first woman president but we didn't get it. I came here because I wanted to see women exercising their power. I no longer want to see women under men. I am about human rights, the idea of bringing attention to a person who attacks women is also why I am here."
Max Brown, 25, from New York City: “The single most important issue for me is obviously the way that Donald Trump has ta
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Ruddy Roye for TIME
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Meet the Men Who Joined the Women's March on Washington

In the weeks leading up to the Women's March on Washington, some men were slow to voice their commitment. But among the throngs of pussy-hatted "nasty women" who turned up on Saturday, there was no shortage of male participants, from speakers like Van Jones and Michael Moore to marchers like former Secretary of State John Kerry and his dog, Ben.

"Something beautiful is being born right here and right now," Jones said in his speech. "President Trump: We're not going to let you mess with women. We're not going to let you mess with the earth. We're not going to let you mess with Black Lives Matter."

Photographer Ruddy Roye spoke to men on the National Mall, photographing and interviewing them about the issues that inspired them to march in solidarity with hundreds of thousands of women.

Ruddy Roye is a documentary photographer based in Brooklyn. He was TIME's pick for Instagram Photographer of 2016. Follow him on Instagram @ruddyroye.

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