TIME Sports

A Couple of Pranksters Crashed a North Korean Golf Tournament

TOPSHOT-GOLF-ASIA-USPGA-EPGA-WGC-CHN
JOHANNES EISELE-AFP/Getty Images TOPSHOT - Daniel Berger of the US makes a putt at the World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions golf tournament in Shanghai on October 27, 2016. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)

"My caddie told me I had bought great shame to my family,” Ruig said

Morgan Ruig and Evan Shay are not professional golfers. This did not stop the Australian duo from signing up as the Australian representatives in the 2016 North Korea Open.

The two pranksters had been playing in a polo match in Beijing when they decided on a whim to try to enter the golf tournament, which is held at a Pyongyang golf course. “We’d just come out of a long lunch, our mate actually did the online application form and they got back to us the next day saying we were in,” Mr Ruig told Yahoo Sports. “I don’t think there was much due diligence done on [North Korea’s] end.”

It wasn’t a risk-free joke. “We were very nervous handing our passports over at the border. There are stories of people not coming home,” Mr Ruig told the Courier-Mail newspaper. Instead, the Australian pair were taken on a chaperoned tour of the capital and lauded as Australia’s golf envoys—until the duo hit the course and their golf skills were found lacking.

“I hit 120 and my caddie told me I had bought great shame to my family,” Ruig said according to the BBC. “We played very poorly… but we met some very interesting people.”

As non-professional golfers, it’s no surprise that Ruig and Shay completely tanked in the competition, but they didn’t come in last. The only competitor who fared worse than them was the Nepalese ambassador’s 15-year-old daughter, according to Yahoo Sports.

Watch the full video below:

Tap to read full story

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com


YOU BROKE TIME.COM!

Dear TIME Reader,

As a regular visitor to TIME.com, we are sure you enjoy all the great journalism created by our editors and reporters. Great journalism has great value, and it costs money to make it. One of the main ways we cover our costs is through advertising.

The use of software that blocks ads limits our ability to provide you with the journalism you enjoy. Consider turning your Ad Blocker off so that we can continue to provide the world class journalism you have become accustomed to.

The TIME Team