TIME

What We’ve Learned About Bill Clinton’s Conflicts

Morning Must Reads: October 27

If you only read one thing: The latest batch of Clinton-camp hacked emails by Wikileaks paints an unseemly picture of the web of ties between Bill Clinton’s foundation and his for-profit interests. While the outlines of these entanglements have long been known, seeing them explained in such clear detail elevates the issue at a political hazardous time for Clinton. It’s the latest reminder of Clinton’s historically weak position and the GOP’s missed opportunity. As Republican operative Michael Steel described her to TIME yesterday, “she is the political equivalent of a jumbo shrimp–she’s a very unpopular and distrusted frontrunner.” These leaks would have been potentially fatal to her candidacy in any other year—that is assuming she was even still in the running—but Trump’s even weaker status makes it almost a moot issue for now for most voters. But conflicts are sure to reemerge as an issue should the trend lines hold and Clinton assumes the White House.

Donald Trump’s campaign is looking to boost its chances by suppressing turn-out of high-propensity Democratic voters: African-Americans, young women, and liberals. It’s far from an unprecedented strategy, but the scale and the openness with which the Trump campaign talks about it is. Trying to keep people away from the polls is antithetical to democratic society, and a tacit admission that most of the country doesn’t support Trump—something borne out over and again in public polls.

Aeromexico uses Trump in a new ad. Trump argues his new hotel is a metaphor for his campaign. And TIME brings you the answers to the big questions: Where can you take a selfie while voting?

Here are your must reads:

Must Reads

‘Bill Clinton, Inc.’ Memo Reveals Tangled Business, Charitable Ties
Aide Secured $116 million in paid and pledged income to Bill Clinton, TIME’s Massimo Calabresi explains

Inside the Trump Bunker, With 12 Days to Go
The Republican candidate and his inner circle have built a direct marketing operation that could power a TV network—or finish off the GOP. [Bloomberg]

Beneath Cheers at Donald Trump’s Rallies, Dark Fears Take Hold
Trump supporters lose confidence and embrace conspiracy [New York Times]

Early Voting: More Good Signs for Clinton in Key States
Democrats out-performing 2012 in several battlegrounds [Associated Press]

Sound Off

“I certainly intend to reach out to Republicans and Independents, and the elected leadership of the Congress. I’m going to be doing everything I can to reach out to people who didn’t vote for me because I want to be the president for everybody, and I intend to do as much of it as I possibly can before the inauguration and to continue afterwords.” — Hillary Clinton on reaching out to Republicans after Election Day

“We have a protester—by the way, were you paid $1,500 to be a thug? Where’s the protester? Was he paid? You can get him out. Get him out. Out!” — Trump in North Carolina Wednesday

Bits and Bites

Joe Klein: The Ultimate Insider Who Could Still Change the Game In the Oval Office

Donald Trump Argues D.C. Hotel Is Metaphor for Campaign [TIME]

Check Out the Best Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton Costumes Just in Time for Halloween [TIME]

Hillary Clinton Jokes That She Takes Style Inspiration From Death Row Records [People]

Justice Thomas Laments a Washington That’s ‘Broken in Some Ways’ [Bloomberg]

Aeromexico Launches A Donald Trump-Themed Fare Sale [One Mile at a Time]

Samantha Bee to Interview President Obama on Full Frontal [TIME]

7 Ideas From Other Countries That Could Improve U.S. Elections [TIME]

Here’s Where You’re Allowed to Take a Selfie While Voting [TIME]

Someone Destroyed Donald Trump’s Hollywood Walk of Fame Star With a Sledgehammer [TIME]

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