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Why Debate Audience Member Ken Bone Is the Internet’s New Hero

The Internet went wild for him

During the heated clash of Sunday night’s presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, an unexpected winner emerged. It’s Ken Bone, an audience member with excellent taste in knitwear, who stepped forward to ask the candidates a question about meeting America’s energy needs while remaining environmentally friendly while minimizing job loss fossil power plant workers.

Bone instantly won the hearts of the American public with his bright red sweater (buy here), a sartorial choice that almost didn’t happen.

In an interview with CNN on Monday, the morning after the debate, Bone revealed that the sweater was actually the solution to a fashion crisis he had had earlier.

“I had a really nice olive suit, and my mother would have been very proud to see me wearing on television, but apparently I have gained about 30 pounds,” Bone said. “And when I went to get in my car the morning of the debate I split the seat of my pants all the way open. So the red sweater is plan B. I’m glad it worked out.”

He’s reportedly getting flooded with Facebook friend requests, but as for the election, Bone says he is still undecided when it comes to who he’ll be voting for in the polls this November.

“Well, I know people hate to hear this but I think I might be more undecided than ever,” he said. “I was leaning very heavily towards Donald Trump but Secretary Clinton impressed me with her composure and with a lot of her answers. So now I think I’m just going to wait for the last political debate and in this cycle you never know what could happen.”

Undecided though he may be, Ken Bone remains a true American hero — at least to Twitter users across the nation.

Watch the question here.

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