TIME 2016 Election

These Are the States That Allow You to Vote Early

A woman stands at the voting booth at the White Marsh Elementary School polling station, April 26, 2016 in Mechanicsville, Maryland.
Mark Wilson/;Getty Images A woman stands at the voting booth at the White Marsh Elementary School polling station, April 26, 2016 in Mechanicsville, Maryland.

Many of the votes cast this presidential election won't be on Nov. 8

The number of Americans voting before Election Day has continued to rise in the last decade.

In 2012, some 35% of ballots were cast early. This year, 37 states and the District of Columbia allow some form of early voting, according to the Associated Press.

There’s more than one kind. Some voters cast absentee ballots by mail, while others cast early in-person votes at the election office or other designated locations.

On Friday, North Carolina will become the first state to mail out its absentee ballots, while voters there can begin voting in-person on Oct. 20.

Read Next: Here Are the Last Possible Dates You Can Register to Vote in Your State

Early voting will account for around half of the ballots cast in battleground states like North Carolina, Colorado, Florida, Arizona, Nevada and Georgia, according to an AP elections projection.

Here’s a guide to when in-person early voting starts in key states. (Absentee ballots may go out at different times.)

September

23: Idaho, Minnesota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wyoming

24: New Jersey

29: Illinois, Iowa, North Dakota

October

9: Maine

10: California, Nebraska

11: Montana, New Mexico

12: Arizona, Indiana, Ohio

17: Georgia

19: Kansas, Tennessee

20: North Carolina

21: Washington

22: Nevada

24: Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Massachusetts, Texas, Wisconsin

25: Hawaii, Louisiana, Utah

26: West Virginia

27: Maryland

28: Washington, D.C.

29: Florida

November

3: Oklahoma

Tap to read full story

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com


YOU BROKE TIME.COM!

Dear TIME Reader,

As a regular visitor to TIME.com, we are sure you enjoy all the great journalism created by our editors and reporters. Great journalism has great value, and it costs money to make it. One of the main ways we cover our costs is through advertising.

The use of software that blocks ads limits our ability to provide you with the journalism you enjoy. Consider turning your Ad Blocker off so that we can continue to provide the world class journalism you have become accustomed to.

The TIME Team