Native Americans march to a burial ground sacred site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River near Cannon Ball, North Dakota Sept. 4, 2016.
Native Americans march to a sacred burial ground site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, Sept. 4, 2016.Robyn Beck—AFP/Getty Images
Native Americans march to a burial ground sacred site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River near Cannon Ball, North Dakota Sept. 4, 2016.
A Standing Rock Sioux flag flies over a protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota on Sept. 3, 2016.
Lamar Armstrong of the Mojave Paiute, right, instructs graduate student Tyesha Ignacio of the Najavo Nation how to prepare donated bison meat in the main kitchen area of the Standing Rock Sioux protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota on Sept. 3, 2016.
People sign a teepee with words of support for protestors at an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipe (DAPL), near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Sept. 3, 2016.
People hang out in the bed of their truck as the sun sets over a protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota on Sept. 3, 2016.
Drummers warm up their instruments over the fire Sacred Stone Camp, North Dakota on Sept. 8, 2016.
Flags of Native American tribes from across the US and Canada line the entrance to a protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota on Sept. 3, 2016.
US-ENVIRONMENT-OIL-PROTEST-PIPELINE
Signs hang from heavy machinery after protesters stopped construction on the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota on Sept. 6, 2016.
Native American protesters play basketball in an encampment that has grown on the banks of the Cannon Ball River in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Sept. 5, 2016.
The Youth Camp Council marched and chanted in opposition to the pipeline construction at the Sacred Stone Camp, in North Dakota on Sept. 8, 2016.
Signs left by protesters demonstrating against the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline sit at the gate of a construction access road in Cannon Ball, North Dakota on Sept. 6, 2016.
Native Americans march to a sacred burial ground site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeli
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Robyn Beck—AFP/Getty Images
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Take a Look at the Thousands of People Protesting the Pipeline in North Dakota

Sep 09, 2016

Federal Judge James Boasberg ordered construction to be continued this Friday and that it was legal for the pipeline to be built on the land the Standing Rock Sioux tribe is arguing to protect.

The Dakota Access Pipeline has made the headlines since April, when the tribe began protesting the pipeline’s construction, which thousands of people have joined in the months since. If the pipeline is built, the tribe says, it will cut through the tribe’s ancestral lands, including sacred areas and ancient burial sites. In addition, the pipeline would run through the tribe's only water source, the Missouri River. The tribe also claims they were not consulted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which has jurisdiction over the land, before the deal was made with Energy Transfer Partners.

Here's a look at how the Standing Rock Sioux tribe along with other Native Americans across the country came to North Dakota to stand with the Standing Rock Sioux in order to protest the pipeline.

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