A firefighter keeps an eye on the Blue Cut fire line, north of Los Angeles, Calif, Aug. 16, 2016.
A firefighter keeps an eye on the Blue Cut fire line, north of Los Angeles, Calif, Aug. 16, 2016.Paul Buck—EPA
A firefighter keeps an eye on the Blue Cut fire line, north of Los Angeles, Calif, Aug. 16, 2016.
A house burns on a hill near Cajon Junction, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
A chicken runs by a chicken coop that burns with animals still inside at in San Bernardino National Forest in San Bernardino County, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
Firefighters battle the Blue Cut wildfire near Cajon Pass, north of San Bernardino, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
A melted sign shows the damage after a wildfire swept through Cajon Junction, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
Burned property at Hess Road and Highway 138 shows the devastation of the Blue Cut fire in West Cajon Valley, Calif., Aug. 17, 2016.
An air tanker drops fire retardant on the Blue Cut wildfire in Lytle Creek, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
San Bernardino County Firefighter, Engineer, and Paramedic, Jeremy Pendergraft, helps a couple evacuate out of their home as she cries off of Hess Rd. as a wildfire off of Hwy 138 quickly approaches in San Bernardino, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
Flames burn next to Interstate 15 as the Blue Cut wildfire rages near Cajon Pass, north of San Bernardino, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
The Blue Cut wildfire burns structures and trees near Cajon Pass, north of San Bernardino, Calif., Aug. 16, 2016.
A firefighter keeps an eye on the Blue Cut fire line, north of Los Angeles, Calif, Aug. 16, 2016.
Paul Buck—EPA
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See Inside the Blue Cut Fire's Explosive Growth and Devastation

Aug 17, 2016

A fast-moving fire is devouring land and homes in Southern California. What started as a small blaze Tuesday in the mountainous Cajon pass grew to nearly 47 square miles by Wednesday, forcing the evacuation of more than 82,000 people, according to the Associated Press.

"This moved so fast," Darren Dalton, 51, told the AP, who along with his wife and son had to get out of his house in Wrightwood. "It went from 'Have you heard there's a fire?' to 'mandatory evacuation' before you could take it all in. This is a tight little community up here. Always in rally mode. Suddenly it's a ghost town."

The fire obliterated at least a dozen buildings, Eric Sherwin of the San Bernardino County Fire Department said according to the AP, including some homes and the Summit Inn, a historic diner.

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