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Here’s a First Look at J.K. Rowling’s New Story About American Wizards

The first installment is now live on Pottermore

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has begun to pull back the veil on the previously untold history of North American witches and wizards, and the first installment of her new series is now live over at Pottermore.

The debut story in The History of Magic in North America, entitled “Fourteenth Century – Seventeenth Century,” examines the early days of the magical community on the continent, the Native Americans and skin-walkers, and an area of wizarding that has kept Harry Potter readers curious for years—wandless magic.

For each of the next three days, a new story will appear on Pottermore at 9 a.m. EST. Here’s a brief breakdown of what to expect from the rest of the week.

Seventeenth Century and Beyond
Debuting March 9 at 9 a.m. EST
Being a witch or wizard in North America is even more dangerous than in Europe. This account, which includes the real histories of the Salem witch trials and the Scourers (a rogue band of magical mercenaries), explains why.

Rappaport’s Law
Debuting March 10 at 9 a.m. EST
In the 18th century, the laws governing secrecy for the wizarding community became even stricter after a major violation that resulted in humiliation for the Magical Congress of the United States of America, the U.S. version of the Ministry of Magic.

1920s Wizarding America
Debuting March 11 at 9 a.m. EST
Ollivanders might have a corner on the wand market across the pond, but the American makers of the finest wizarding implements were Wolfe, Jonker, Quintana, and Beauvais. This is their story.

After reading the first story, come back to TIME.com for more about the exciting new chapters in wizarding history.

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