TIME 2016 Election

Twitter, Google and the Associated Press Partner on Voter Tracking Tool

The media filing center for the Republican presidential debate at St. Anselm College includes a large video screen displaying motion graphics about how the candidates are trending on Google February 6, 2016 in Manchester, Iowa.
Joe Raedle—Getty Images The media filing center for the Republican presidential debate at St. Anselm College includes a large video screen displaying motion graphics about how the candidates are trending on Google February 6, 2016 in Manchester, Iowa.

AP Election Buzz tracks real time voter interest

Twitter and Google launched a partnership Monday with the Associated Press to visualize the online elections chatter.

The AP Election Buzz is an interactive look at what Americans are searching for or tweeting about in real-time. As voting takes place in the 11 Super Tuesday states data from social media and search engines may be able to shed some light that polls couldn’t, specifically day-of interest from voters.

Data can be set show the total online activity for the day or since as far back as last August. From there, daily search interest from Google is broken down by candidate and by issues, showing who or what caught the interest of users for the day. The same is done for the day’s Twitter conversation.

Right now, Trump is leading both Google searches and in Twitter conversation by leaps and bounds, which could be a good or bad sign for the Republican front-runner, as it’s hard to tell whether this is positive or negative sentiment.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has seen a recent surge in Google searches as has Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

 

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