Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (D-VT) gives a concession speech at the Henderson Pavilion on Feb. 20 in Henderson, Nevada.
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (D-VT) gives a concession speech at the Henderson Pavilion on Feb. 20 in Henderson, Nevada. Ethan Miller—Getty Images

Bernie Sanders Says Low Voter Turnout Led to Loss in Nevada

Feb 21, 2016

Lower voter turnout and Hillary Clinton’s familiarity with Nevada contributed to Bernie Sanders’ loss in the state’s caucuses, the Vermont Senator said Sunday.

Sanders said he failed to draw enough people to the polls in Nevada, where his Democratic presidential rival Clinton won Saturday with nearly 53% support, according to the Washington Post. “What I've said over and over again, we will do well when young people, when working-class people come out,” Sanders said on NBC’s Meet the Press. “We do not do well when the voter turnout is not large. We did not do as good a job as I had wanted to bring out a large turnout.”

Sanders also said Clinton had a leg up in the state from competing against Barack Obama and John Edwards in 2008. “She knew Nevada a lot better than we did. She had the names of a lot of her supporters,” he said. “So I am proud of the campaign that we ran. Obviously, I wish we could have done a little bit better. But at the end of the day, I think she gets 19 delegates, we get 15 delegates, we move onto the next state.”

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