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Can You Spot Three of Saturn’s Moons in This Photo?

The Cassini spacecraft captures Enceladus above Saturn's rings and Rhea below. The tiny speck of Atlas can also be seen just above and to the left of Rhea, and just above the thin line of Saturn's F ring. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2015.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute The Cassini spacecraft captures Enceladus above Saturn's rings and Rhea below. The tiny speck of Atlas can also be seen just above and to the left of Rhea, and just above the thin line of Saturn's F ring. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2015.

A camera on the Cassini spacecraft captured the moons from as far as 1.8 million miles away

NASA released an image on Monday depicting three moons orbiting Saturn, one of which is difficult to spot amid the planet’s many rings.

Enceladus appears above Saturn’s rings in the photo and Rhea below. The third moon, Atlas, is comparatively smaller and appears above Rhea to the left, just over the line of one of Saturn’s rings.

The image was captured on Sept. 24 by a camera on the Cassini spacecraft. The ship was launched with the cooperation of NASA, the European Space Agency and A.S.I, the Italian space agency, with the goal of learning more about Saturn.

Read more: See Striking Black & White Photos of Saturn Captured by NASA’s Cassini

Saturn has 62 moons and 53 of them have names.

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