TIME France

French Parliament Unanimously Approves Law to Cut Food Waste

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Jacques LOIC—Getty Images/Photononstop RM French officials have passed a bill that , if made a law, would go into effect January 13 and would require supermarkets larger than about 4000 square feet to give edible food away for human or animal consumption. The law would also put an end to the practice of pouring bleach over unsold food before throwing it out.

The law would require large supermarkets to donate unsold food items

Officials in the French Parliament voted unanimously to put an end to food waste by forcing large grocery stores to donate unsold food.

The rule, part of another law passed in May, was initially scrapped because of a technicality, according to the Guardian. The bill was reintroduced Wednesday in the Assemble National—France’s version of the House of Representatives—and passed quickly as a “crucial measure for the planet.”

The law will now go before the French Sénat, where it is expected to easily pass. It comes at a time when the environment is at the front of French minds as world leaders hammer out an agreement at a the COP21 climate change summit.

If passed, the law would go into effect January 13th and would require supermarkets larger than about 4000 square feet to give edible food away for human or animal consumption. The law would also put an end to the practice of pouring bleach over unsold food before throwing it out.

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