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J.K. Rowling Reveals the American Word for Muggle

Nov 04, 2015

Move over, Muggles. There's new American lingo in town.

J.K. Rowling revealed to Entertainment Weekly that in America, the wizarding community uses the word "No-Maj" (pronounced 'no madge' as in 'no magic) to reference someone who isn't a wizard.

The news comes straight from the set of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, the Harry Potter prequel that follows Eddie Redmayne's Newt Scamander, a "magizoologist," around New York in the 1920s.

EW showed fans their first look at Redmayne on its recent cover, where he stands inside the entrance of the majestic art deco-influenced Magical Congress of the United States of America (or MACUSA), which is the American version of the Ministry of Magic that’s housed inside the Woolworth Building in the film.”

Fans already knew the wizarding world was expanding when Rowling revealed there was, in fact, an American Hogwarts. With the film not due out until November of 2016, who knows what other American wizarding facts we have in store.

11 Real-Life Harry Potter Destinations You Can Visit

Salem Witch Museum in Salem, Mass. 'Potter' fans may not be able to pay a visit to Olivander's Wand Shop in real life, but Wynott's Wands will get them pretty close. Visitors say that the teeny shop feels just like something out of J.K. Rowling's imagination, and is located in the magical capital of America: Salem, Mass.
Salem Witch Museum in Salem, Mass. 'Potter' fans may not be able to pay a visit to Olivander's Wand Shop in real life, but Wynott's Wands will get them pretty close. Visitors say that the teeny shop feels just like something out of J.K. Rowling's imagination, and is located in the magical capital of America: Salem, Mass.Getty Images
Salem Witch Museum in Salem, Mass. 'Potter' fans may not be able to pay a visit to Olivander's Wand Shop in real life, but Wynott's Wands will get them pretty close. Visitors say that the teeny shop feels just like something out of J.K. Rowling's imagination, and is located in the magical capital of America: Salem, Mass.
A game during the Quidditch World Cup in Myrtle Beach, S.C. on April 5, 2014. It may have originated as a magical sport, but Quidditch has made its way to the muggle world. And thanks to a number of seriously devoted Potter fans, you can attend the Quidditch World Cup, just like Ron, Harry, and Hermione did in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The good news is that unlike in the book, the real-life Quidditch World Cup is held annually, in April – this year in South Carolina.
The Millennium Bridge in London. If you're traveling to London, a stop by the Millennium Bridge is necessary for all visitors – but especially Potter fans. In 'Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,' readers learn that the bridge was destroyed by Death Eaters sent by Voldemort. In reality, the bridge still stands today, and is the perfect path from St. Paul's Cathedral to the Tate Modern.
The London Zoo in London. The London Zoo doesn't appear on screen in 'Harry Potter' for long – but the scene it does appear in is significant. Harry communicates with a snake, later revealed to be due to his ability to speak parseltongue, which becomes a fairly significant plot throughout the series. Visit the reptile enclave at the London Zoo to see where it all began.
The Hogwarts Express
The Jacobite running by Glenfinnan Viaduct in Lochaber, Scotland. Looking for an attraction that will scratch your 'Harry Potter' sight-seeing itch and satisfy your travel companions? Try the Jacobite, a steam train that runs along the western coast of Scotland, giving travelers a gorgeous view of the Scottish countryside – and make you feel like you're riding the Hogwarts Express in real life. 'Potter' fans should keep their eyes peeled for the Glenfinnan viaduct, the 21-arched overpass that is seen in the film.
The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios in Osaka, Japan. If you don't want to cross the Atlantic but have a hankering for a day (or two!) full of 'Harry Potter,' best to head down to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, a theme park in Orlando, Fla. Parkgoers can explore Hogwarts, Hogsmeade, the Hogwarts Express and Diagon Alley, all with a butterbeer in hand.
The Grand Hall, Christ Church, Oxford University in Oxford, U.K. When it comes to 'Harry Potter,' few sights are as iconic as Hogwarts's Great Hall. In the film, young witches and wizards from each house gather around long tables for meals and ceremonial events – much like the students at Christ Church, a college at Oxford University. Visitors can get a peek at the real thing during a visit to the college – if there isn't an educational event going on, of course.
Durham Cathedral in Durham, England. Remember that snowy courtyard Harry walked through with his pet owl, Hedwig, in 'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone'? You can take your own stroll through the same spot during a visit to the Durham Cathedral.
Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, England. This Medieval castle was used as a set for the fictional Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry in the first two Harry Potter films. You'll see Alnwick in familiar scenes like Harry's first broomstick flying lesson in 'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' or Ron's flying car crash in 'Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.'
The Black Park in Iver, England. Thrill seekers can find Harry Potter's Forbidden Forest come to life at the Black Park in Iver, England. The spiders, however, won't come in larger-than-life form – we hope.
Salem Witch Museum in Salem, Mass. 'Potter' fans may not be able to pay a visit to Olivander's Wand Shop in real life, b
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