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West Hollywood's New Drought PSA Is Straight Out of Westeros

Oct 15, 2015

Winter is coming, but for drought-stricken California that does not necessarily mean that water—and an easing of water-use restrictions—will come with it.

To remind its residents that winter does not mean an end to the drought, the City of West Hollywood has crafted a memorable public service announcement with a Game of Thrones-themed reminder to conserve.

The new PSA is straight out of Westeros. According to the map featured in the credits, West Hollywood appears to be located somewhere near the Lannisters' stronghold of Casterly Rock. The video comes packed with the Mother of Dragons, a Jon Snow-lookalike, explosive special effects, the haunting GoT theme music, and, of course, a powerful message to continue to conserve water as the state faces one of the most serious droughts in recent history.

The video was created in partnership with Change the Course, a first-of-its-kind water sustainability campaign from partners Participant Media, National Geographic Society, and the Bonneville Environmental Foundation. The campaign is meant to remind people that their daily choices can affect the state's overall water footprint. Luckily, watching Game of Thrones fits in with the state's mandatory water restrictions, because it doesn't require any water at all.

See How California Is Using Its Diminishing Water Resources

The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades are seen in Sylmar
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades, which bring water 223 miles from the Owens River in the eastern Sierra Nevada mountains, and 137 miles from the Haiwee Reservoir, are a major source of water for Los Angeles. Seen here in Sylmar, Calif. on May 4, 2015.Lucy Nicholson—Reuters
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades are seen in Sylmar
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades are seen in Sylmar
A creek is seen in Northridge
A tractor ploughs a field next to a canal in Los Banos
A worker walks through farm fields in Los Banos
A canal runs through farm fields in Los Banos
"In the Central Valley, where most agricultural water use occurs, the failure to manage groundwater sustainably limits its availability as a drought reserve. The increase in perennial crops—which need to be watered every year—has made the region even more vulnerable," the Public Policy Institute of California states.
Water pours into a canal in Los Banos
Livestock products, including meat, dairy and eggs, account for more than a quarter of California's agricultural sector, a $12.5 billion industry, according to the USDA. Cattle are among the most water-hungry livestock, consuming an average of106 gallons per pound of beef. Cattle are seen at Harris Ranch in Coalinga, Calif. on May 5, 2015.
A wheat field is seen in Los Banos
A water protest sign is seen in Los Banos
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades, which bring water 223 miles from the Owens River in the eastern Sierra Nevada mountai
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Lucy Nicholson—Reuters
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