Members of the LGBT community parade in Entebbe, southwest of Uganda's capital Kampala
Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community parade in Entebbe, southwest of the Ugandan capital Kampala, on Aug. 8, 2015 Edward Echwalu—Reuters

Uganda's LGBT Community Holds a Cautious Pride March

Aug 10, 2015

A year after a law punishing homosexual acts with life in prison was annulled after strong international pressure, hundreds of Ugandans gathered for a gay-rights march along the shores of Lake Victoria on Saturday.

About 400 people, some trying to mask their identities by covering their faces, turned up for the march in Entebbe, southwest of the Ugandan capital Kampala, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Homosexuality remains illegal in Uganda. Social attitudes toward the LGBT community have also grown increasingly negative in recent years. Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has even encouraged individuals to report any "suspicious" homosexual activity, the Guardian reports.

The Journal reports that some things have gotten easier for the LGBT community — they no longer have to deal with frequent police raids, while eviction rates of gay tenants have also slowed. But conservative lawmakers have vowed to reinstate the law mandating life in prison.

“We’re happy the government realized there are more pressing issues than people’s sexual orientation,” Kasha Jacqueline, who took part in the march, told the Journal. “But the struggle continues.”

[WSJ]

Silent No More: Early Days in the Fight for Gay Rights

In commemoration of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village, militants this year designated the last week in June as Gay Liberation Week and celebrated with a candlelight parade. The parade involved 300 male and female homosexuals, who marched without incident two miles from Gay Activists headquarters to a park near City Hall.
Caption from LIFE In commemoration of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village, militants this year designated the last week in June as Gay Liberation Week and celebrated with a candlelight parade. The parade involved 300 male and female homosexuals, who marched without incident two miles from Gay Activists headquarters to a park near City Hall.Grey Villet—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images
In commemoration of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village, militants this year designated the last week in June as Gay Liberation Week and celebrated with a candlelight parade. The parade involved 300 male and female homosexuals, who marched without incident two miles from Gay Activists headquarters to a park near City Hall.
When a bill guaranteeing equal job opportunities for homosexuals stalled in New York City Council last spring, militants demonstrated at City Hall. With fists raised, they shout a football style "Gay Power" cheer at police blocking the building.
Gay rights protest, 1971.
A homosexual activist steps between a pair of police horses to be interviewed during a New York demonstration. Militants often charge police brutality and welcome arrest for the sake of publicity. They also encourage press coverage of their protest actions.
Gay rights protest, 1971.
Gay rights protest, California, 1971.
Gay rights protest, New York, 1971.
Collared by a patrolman after he deliberately crossed police barricades at New York's City Hall, Gay Activists Alliance President Jim Owles submits to arrest. Members of his organization were protesting City Council reluctance to debate a fair employment bill for homosexuals.
Gay rights protest, New York, 1971.
Gay rights protest, New York, 1971.
Gay rights protest, New York, 1971.
Gay Pride, 1971.
Gay Activists Alliance, New York, 1971.
Gay rights rally, 1971.
Gay rights event, 1971.
Caption from LIFE In commemoration of the 1969 Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village, militants this year designated the
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Grey Villet—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images
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