North Korea Is Creating Its Own Time Zone to Spite The 'Wicked Japanese Imperialists'

Aug 07, 2015

North Korea's state media is reporting that on Aug. 15 the country will abandon the time zone it shares with Japan and South Korea and create its own.

Pyongyang Standard Time, as it were, will be 12 and a half hours ahead of the Eastern United States — 30 minutes behind Japan Standard Time, which both Koreas have used since Japan colonized the Korean Peninsula in 1910.

"The wicked Japanese imperialists committed such unpardonable crimes as depriving Korea of even its standard time while mercilessly trampling down its land," said KCNA, North Korea's state mouthpiece.

The decision serves to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Korea's independence, which enabled the political rise of Kim Il Sung, North Korea's founding father and grandfather to Kim Jong Un, the country's third and current supreme leader. South Korea briefly returned to its precolonial time zone in 1954 before embracing Japan's standard in 1961, citing diplomatic benefits.

See the Monumental Extravagance of North Korea's Architecture

Portraits of the leaders in a Pyongyang Metro car The Pyongyang Metro opened in 1973 and currently consists of two lines
Portraits of the leaders in a Pyongyang Metro car. The Pyongyang Metro opened in 1973 and currently consists of two linesEddo Hartmann—Koryo Studio
Portraits of the leaders in a Pyongyang Metro car The Pyongyang Metro opened in 1973 and currently consists of two lines
Statue of Kim Il Sung at Kaeson station,
Portrait of the Leaders, Jannamsan Hotel, Kaesong, Pyongyang. There are a number of portraits of the North Korean leaders, featuring specific backdrops or content that have been officially approved and are displayed throughout the country. Artists who have been specially trained in reproducing the image of the leaders create all these portraits at Mansudae Art Studio in Pyongyang
Yanggakdo HotelSituated on Yanggak Island is this 47-storey hotel. Despite the broad marble-clad foyer seen in other North Korean hotels; both the construction methods, and the wider architectural style of this 1995 hotel display a marked departure from the ways of the past, paving the way for the more modern architecture.
Rush hour | Pyongyang MetroThe stations contained within the Pyongyang Metro showcase distinct designs, usually featuring statues, mosaics, and a frequent use of marble; much of this subway system is reminiscent of the Moscow Metro’s opulent station interiors, which were built during the late-Stalin period.
Kim Il Sung SquareConstructed in the mid-1950s, this square lies in the centre of post-war Pyongyang, and was built in the same style as many of those found in the USSR. This area is a key focal point within the DPRK (North Korea), and plays host to all of the country’s most important and often seen military parades and mass rallies.
Sings display the date of Kim Il sung's birthday, which is April 15. That date is now a national holiday in North Korea
The entrance to Kim Il sung stadium. The marble pillars and expansive lobby are typical of the neoclassical style seen throughout Pyongyang
Kumsusan Palace of the SunA loudspeaker sits outside this building which originally functioned as the seat of government under Kim Il Sung (1912-1994), and today acts as his mausoleum, as well as that of his son, Kim Jong Il (1941-2011). These sorts of loudspeaker, which broadcast revolutionary music and messages from the Workers’ Party, are found in almost all public spaces throughout Pyongyang.
Portraits of the leaders in a Pyongyang Metro car. The Pyongyang Metro opened in 1973 and currently consists of two lin
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Eddo Hartmann—Koryo Studio
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