A receptionist dinosaur robot performs at the new robot hotel, aptly called Henn na Hotel or Weird Hotel, in Sasebo, southwestern Japan, July 15, 2015.
Shizuo Kambayashi—AP
By Olivia B. Waxman
July 16, 2015

A new Japanese hotel in Nagasaki seems more like Jurassic Park than home away from home.

At Henn-na Hotel, a dinosaur robot points guests to the touch screen where they can check themselves in at the hotel in southwestern Japan, which is part of the Huis Ten Bosch amusement park. In hotel rooms, a “lamp-size robot” can tell guests the time, the weather, and turn off the lights for them. Others are supposed to be able to deliver room service. And a robotic arm can hand guests a box for storing their valuables and then put the box into the wall.

The hotel is using the robots “to save labor costs,” the Associated Press reports.

But robots can’t do everything. Humans are watching the security cameras and, as hotel runner Hideo Sawada told the AP, “They still can’t make beds.”

A receptionist dinosaur robot greets a hotel employee demonstrating how to check in for the media at the new hotel, aptly called Henn na Hotel or Weird Hotel, in Sasebo, southwestern Japan, July 15, 2015.
Shizuo Kambayashi—AP
Two receptionist robots, left, greet a hotel employee demonstrating how to check in the new hotel, called Henn na Hotel, in Sasebo, southwestern Japan, July 15, 2015.
Shizuo Kambayashi—AP
A receptionist robot, top center, accompanied by two other robots, greets a hotel employee demonstrating how to check in the new hotel, aptly called Henn na Hotel or Weird Hotel, in Sasebo, southwestern Japan, July 15, 2015
Shizuo Kambayashi—AP
A receptionist robot performs during a demonstration for the media at the new hotel, aptly called Henn na Hotel or Weird Hotel, in Sasebo, southwestern Japan, Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Shizuo Kambayashi—AP

Write to Olivia B. Waxman at olivia.waxman@time.com.

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