By Ryan Teague Beckwith
June 25, 2015

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act won the battle of opinions at the Supreme Court Thursday, but critics may win the battle of words.

The 6-3 majority opinion in King v. Burwell upholds subsidies to millions of Americans buying health insurance through Obamacare, but it does so in relatively bloodless language about deferring to congressional intent.

But the fiery dissent from conservative Justice Antonin Scalia — joined by Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito — features a number of zingers, applause lines and harshly worded criticism.

Here’s a look at seven of his best lines:

Scalia starts by bashing the majority opinion:

Then he shows how depressed the case makes him:

Then he questions his colleagues’ motivation:

Then he uses a word from the 19th century to criticize their logic:

Then he uses a euphemism for what he thinks of their logic your grandma might have used:

Then he suggests an alternate name for Obamacare:

Then instead of ending with the typical “I respectfully dissent,” he writes this:

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