Nov. 28, 1983
Nov. 28, 1983, cover of TIME Cover Credit: R.B. KITAJ

Read TIME's Original Review of Nineteen Eighty-Four

Jun 08, 2015

George Orwell was already an established literary star when his masterwork Nineteen Eighty-Four was published on this day in 1949, but that didn't stop TIME's reviewer from being pleasantly surprised by the book. After all, even the expectation that a book would be good doesn't mean one can't be impressed when it turns out to be, as TIME put it, "absolutely super."

One of the reasons, the review suggested, was Orwell's bet that his fictional dystopia would not actually seem so foreign to contemporary readers. They would easily recognize many elements of the fictional world that TIME summed up as such:

In Britain 1984 A.D., no one would have suspected that Winston and Julia were capable of crimethink (dangerous thoughts) or a secret desire for ownlife (individualism). After all, Party-Member Winston Smith was one of the Ministry of Truth's most trusted forgers; he had always flung himself heart & soul into the falsification of government statistics. And Party-Member Julia was outwardly so goodthinkful (naturally orthodox) that, after a brilliant girlhood in the Spies, she became active in the Junior Anti-Sex League and was snapped up by Pornosec, a subsection of the government Fiction Department that ground out happy-making pornography for the masses. In short, the grim, grey London Times could not have been referring to Winston and Julia when it snorted contemptuously: "Old-thinkers unbellyfeel Ingsoc," i.e., "Those whose ideas were formed before the Revolution cannot have a full emotional understanding of the principles of English Socialism."

How Winston and Julia rebelled, fell in love and paid the penalty in the terroristic world of tomorrow is the thread on which Britain's George Orwell has spun his latest and finest work of fiction. In Animal Farm (TIME, Feb. 4, 1946,) Orwell parodied the Communist system in terms of barnyard satire; but in 1984 ... there is not a smile or a jest that does not add bitterness to Orwell's utterly depressing vision of what the world may be in 35 years' time.

Decades later, as the real-life 1984 approached, TIME dedicated a cover story to Orwell's earlier vision of what that year could have been like. "That Year Is Almost Here," the headline proclaimed. But obsessing over how it matched up to its fictional depiction was missing the point, the article posited. "The proper way to remember George Orwell, finally, is not as a man of numbers—1984 will pass, not Nineteen Eighty - Four —but as a man of letters," wrote Paul Gray, "who wanted to change the world by changing the word."

Read the full 1949 review, here in the TIME Vault: Where the Rainbow Ends

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