Evangelist and Reformer Sojourner Truth
Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), pictured circa 1880. Truth, whose legal name was Isabella Van Wagener, was born into slavery but later freed. She worked as an abolitionist, suffragette, and evangelist. She was well known for the speech "Ain't I a Woman?" that she delivered at the 1851 Women's Rights Convention.Corbis
Evangelist and Reformer Sojourner Truth
Lucy Stone circa 1860s
Portrait of American feminist Victoria Claflin Woodhull, circa 1872.
Writer Julia Ward Howe circa 1890s.
Suffragist Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), seated at her desk, December 1898.
Portrait of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1910.
Carrie Chapman Catt (1849-1947), Suffragette taking part in New York parade.
Suffragette Kate M. Gordon of Tennessee, 1914.
Alice Paul, American feminist, 1920.
Portrait of Ida B. Wells, 1920.
Alva Ertskin Belmont
American pacifist leader and former congresswoman Jeannette Rankin (1880 - 1973) addresses a rally at Union Square, New York, New York, September 1924.
Minnie Fisher Cunningham who has announced her candidacy for the US Senate from Texas. She is a Democrat, and is now in Washington instructing members of the Women's National Democratic Club in politics, August 5, 1927.
Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), pictured circa 1880. Truth, whose legal name was Isabella Van Wagener, was born into slaver
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Corbis
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See 13 Great American Woman Suffragists

June 4 is a big day in the history of American women: it was on this day in 1919 that Congress passed the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed them the right to vote.

The achievement was a long time coming, built on decades of hard—and, in some cases, contentious—work by scores of dedicated women and men. (It also, coincidentally, came six years to the day after another important moment in the history of worldwide women's suffrage, the day that British suffragette Emily Davison was trampled to death by the King's horse at Epsom.)

These 13 women—commonly known as suffragettes, though that term more specifically refers to a group of British suffrage supporters—were crucial to that cause.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot, Russia Members of the feminist punk rock collective were jailed after protesting Russian President Putin in a church. The group has since used its notoriety to promote human rights issues. The very name of the band is meant to turn something passive into something powerful.Yuri Kozyrev—Noor for TIME
Tawakul Karman, Yemen
Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar
Corazon Aquino, the Philippines
Phoolan Devi, India
Angela Davis, the U.S.
Golda Meir, Israel
Vilma Lucila Espín, Cuba
Janet Jagan, Guyana
Jiang Qing, China
Nadezhda Krupskaya, Russia
Susan B. Anthony, the U.S.
Emmeline Pankhurst, Britain
Harriet Tubman, the U.S.
Mary Wollstonecraft
Joan of Arc, France
Boudica, Britain
Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot, Russia Members of the feminist punk rock collective were jaile
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Yuri Kozyrev—Noor for TIME
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