TIME.com stock photos Money Dollar Bills
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

These Are the Worst Jobs of 2015

Apr 14, 2015

The job search website CareerCast.com has released its annual list of the best and worst jobs of 2015. The site says the ranking is based on "income, outlook, environmental factors, stress and physical demands." Basically, the list of best jobs is great news for people who are good at math.

The Worst Jobs of 2015:

1. Newspaper reporter
2. Lumberjack
3. Enlisted military personnel
4. Cook
5. Broadcaster
6. Photojournalist
7. Corrections officer
8. Taxi driver
9. Firefighter
10. Mail carrier

The Best Jobs of 2015

1. Actuary
2. Audiologist
3. Mathematician
4. Statistician
5. Biomedical engineer
6. Data scientist
7. Dental hygienist
8. Software engineer
9. Occupational therapist
10. Computer systems analyst

Read next: 10 Keys to Job Satisfaction, Backed By Research

Inside the Tech Revolution That's Turning Rwanda Around

Fellows in the Code Club 2015 work at the Hehe Labs headquarters at "The Office" in Kigali, Rwanda, a co-working space for young entrepreneurs.
Fellows in Code Club 2015 work at the Hehe Labs headquarters at "The Office" in Kigali, Rwanda, a coworking space for young entrepreneurs.Cassandra Giraldo
Fellows in the Code Club 2015 work at the Hehe Labs headquarters at "The Office" in Kigali, Rwanda, a co-working space for young entrepreneurs.
"The Office", a coworking space in Kigali, Rwanda is a shared office where tech entrepreneurs, consultants, freelancers, small business owners, and remote employees can rent desk space and share the costs of a full-service office.
Code Club 2015 fellows working at Hehe Labs.
A S.O.S. Kagugu Technical High School student during an after school coding club run by HeHe Ltd. youth fellows.
Coding Fellows gather around the computer to learn HTML at an after school program run by HeHe Ltd. at SOS Technical High School.
Inventing Rwanda
Inside kLab, a co-working space for tech entrepreneurs located in Telecom House in Kigali's future high-tech ICT neighborhood, Kacyiru.
Young women transport corn husks in the outskirts of Kigali. Rwanda is attempting to turn an agrarian society into a knowledge-based economy and instilling a sense of national identity and unity in Rwandans.
A government-sponsored fiber-optic cable expansion project was completed in 2011, improving telecommunication services throughout the country. The cellular network covers nearly 98% of the population. Advertisements for phone service providors can be seen all over Kigali, even painted on family homes.
Josephine Niyigena, 25, chats with a friend on her cell phone while she sells fabric at Kimironko market in Kigali. The cellular network covers nearly 98% of the population.
Fellows in Code Club 2015 work at the Hehe Labs headquarters at "The Office" in Kigali, Rwanda, a coworking space for yo
... VIEW MORE

Cassandra Giraldo
1 of 10

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

All products and services featured are based solely on editorial selection. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website.