Lynsey Addario / VII
By Mikko Takkunen
August 12, 2013

Features and Essays

Those employees at the happiest place on earth? Many of them are homeless parents, according to the Associated Press. Many Walt Disney World employees cannot afford the average $800 per month rent while being paid minimum wage ($8.03 per hour) working at the park. Meanwhile, any one person pays about $100 just for admission into Orlando's theme parks. 1,216 families in Florida's Osceola Country are living out of hotels because they cannot afford to do anything else and because the county does not have any shelters. Many small hotel owners—running mom-and-pop businesses—have complained to the county sheriff that families are overcrowding rooms and unable to pay long-term. Some have even filed lawsuits. (Larger, more expensive hotels that house many of the tourists visiting Disney World don't have to deal with the same issue.) Advocates blame the problem on low wages and comparatively high rent given those salaries in the 300,000 person county. According to census figures, the median income in Osceola County is just $24,128 a year. Walt Disney World, the area's largest employer, may have to fork out more money (up to $10) to its employees as contracts are being negotiated with the resort's biggest union group. [AP]
Lynsey Addario / VII

Lynsey Addario: Finding redemption in the world’s ‘rape capital’ (CNN Photo blog) Democratic Republic of Congo

Pete Muller: Mugabe Faces Test in Zimbabwe Vote (NYT) Related: Mugabe Faces Test as Zimbabwe Votes

Glenna Gordon: Nigerian Weddings: Money and Marriage in a Massive African Economy (The Daily Beast)

National Geographic: The Serengeti Lion (National Geographic) interactive multimedia

Richard Mosse: The Enclave (New Republic) Congo

Dillon Marsh: ‘Invasive Species’ in Cape Town (CNN) Cell phone towers disguised as trees have popped up all around South Africa

Alessandro Gandolfi: Harenna, the last coffee collectors (Parallelo Zero) Ethiopia

Justin Bieber was detained at Los Angeles International Airport by U.S. Customs officials on Thursday after returning from Asia. The singer was held for "routine secondary questioning," according to People, and is not blocked from re-entering the the United States. Bieber reportedly has spent more than two hours at the airport after arriving on a flight from Tokyo. His entourage is waiting for him. Bieber was arrested in January in Miami Beach for driving under the influence. Less than a week later, Canadian police charged him with suspicion of assaulting a limousine driver. He was also recently named a suspect in an egging incident at a neighbor's house in his gated Calabasas, California community. A petition asking the White House to deport the Canadian native following several arrests has gotten more than 274,000 signatures. But the White House issued a statement Monday saying it would not comment on the petition. "Sorry to disappoint, but we won't be commenting on this one," reads the statement. [People]
Mosa’ab Elshamy

Mosa’ab Elshamy: Witness to a Massacre: Photographs from Rabaa (LightBox) Egypt

Narciso Contreras: A Burst of Violence in Cairo (NYT)

At an event at its San Francisco headquarters this evening, Pinterest announced a major new feature: Guided Search. As you've already figured out, it's a way to find things--images, products, recipes and more--which other people have pinned on the service. But search is traditionally text-oriented and meant to help you find something specific; Pinterest is largely visual and mostly about stumbling across stuff which you'll enjoy. So Guided Search isn't just a conventional search engine. And since 75 percent of people use Pinterest on mobile devices, it's designed to be something you do with one hand, minimal typing required. [caption id="attachment_76900" align="alignright" width="300"] Ben Silbermann of Pinterest announces Guided Search Harry McCracken / TIME[/caption]You do initiate a search by beginning to type a word. As you do, Pinterest suggests terms. And then it turns your query into tags which you can delete or add to, letting you refine or broaden your search. It also starts showing the names of Guides made up of pins relating to terms associated with your search; you can pull up any of these Guides with one tap. In a search shown in a video at the event, for instant, starting to type "Vespa" lets you quickly create tags for "Vespa" and "Vintage." It also shows you Guides such as "vintage," "scooters" and "helmets," letting you pivot from your original Vespa search into a board made up of items which might be closely related to the topic, or only tangentially associated with it. Besides Guided Search, the company announced a couple of other changes meant to help people discover pins. A feature called Custom Categories lets you browse through pins on niche topics which weren't formerly organized in one place. And Pinterest says that the Related Pins feature now does a smarter job of identifying interesting pins related to the one you're looking at. "There's a lot of pins and not a lot of time," said Pinterest co-founder and CEO Ben Silbermann at the event. "That's a problem. At Pinterest, we're making it easy to find just what you were looking for, or maybe what you didn't know you were looking for." Pinterest says that Guided Search will get better as more and more people use it. It's rolling out first in the service's apps for iPhone, iPad and Android, and should be available shortly. (I don't see it in the App Store on my iPhone just yet.)
Moises Saman / Magnum Photos

Moises Saman: Human trafficking in the Sinai (Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin)

Rina Castelnuovo: A Rite of Passage, an Act of Defiance (NYT) In a West Bank culture of conflict, boys wield the weapon at hand

Ahmed Deeb: Tunnel Children (zReportage) Gaza Strip

Uriel Sinai: Animal ER, Israel (Reportage by Getty Images)

Andrea Bruce: In Old City of Damascus, War Closes In (NYT) More on NOOR website here

Andrew McConnell: Lebanon: The Gathering Storm (Panos Pictures)

Tommy Forbes: Doha (American Photo) The capital city of Qatar, a shimmering city at the edge of the desert

Diego Ibarra Sanchez: Ending Polio, but First, Many Setbacks (NYT) Pakistan

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: India (VII Photo)

Justin Jin: Another Great Leap Forward? (Panos Pictures) China

David Butow: Seeing Buddha (NYT Lens) Photographing the part of Buddhism that can’t be seen

Ji Yeo: Beauty Recovery Room (Dazed Digital) Post-op plastic surgery portraits from South Korea | related interview here

Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times

Sergey Ponomarev: Afghan School Woes (NYT)

Marieke van der Velden: A Monday, or Any Day, in Kabul (NYT Lens) In Kabul, so often depicted as impoverished and war-ravaged, van der Velden chose to focus on the people living the story, asking them, What is your favorite place in your city?

David Gilkey: Afghanistan (NPR Pictureshow)

Christoph Bangert: Embracing the West, Except Its Ideals (NYT) Afghan youth

At an event at its San Francisco headquarters this evening, Pinterest announced a major new feature: Guided Search. As you've already figured out, it's a way to find things--images, products, recipes and more--which other people have pinned on the service. But search is traditionally text-oriented and meant to help you find something specific; Pinterest is largely visual and mostly about stumbling across stuff which you'll enjoy. So Guided Search isn't just a conventional search engine. And since 75 percent of people use Pinterest on mobile devices, it's designed to be something you do with one hand, minimal typing required. You do initiate a search by beginning to type a word. As you do, Pinterest suggests terms. And then it turns your query into tags which you can delete or add to, letting you refine or broaden your search. It also starts showing the names of Guides made up of pins relating to terms associated with your search; you can pull up any of these Guides with one tap. In a search shown in a video at the event, for instant, starting to type "Vespa" lets you quickly create tags for "Vespa" and "Vintage." It also shows you categories such as "vintage," "scooters" and "helmets," letting you pivot from your original Vespa search into a board made up of items which might be closely related to the topic, or quite different. "There's a lot of pins and not a lot of time," said Pinterest co-founder and CEO Ben Silbermann at the event. "That's a problem. At Pinterest, we're making it easy to find just what you were looking for, or maybe what you didn't know you were looking for." Pinterest says that Guided Search will get better as more and more people use it. It's rolling out first in the service's apps for iPhone, iPad and Android, and should be available shortly. (I don't see it in the App Store on my iPhone just yet.)
Jordi Ruiz Cirera

Jordi Ruiz Cirera: Bolivia’s isolated Mennonite community (CNN Photo blog)

Juan Manuel Castro Prieto: Shamanism looms high in the Andes (CNN Photo blog)

Ana Carolina Fernandes: Bodies and Souls (burn magazine) Transvestite community in Rio

Lianne Milton: Wrecking homes for an Olympic highway in Rio (CNN Photo blog)

George Steinmetz

George Steinmetz: Rebuilding the Jersey Shore (New Yorker) Shortly after Hurricane Sandy, Steinmetz helicoptered over New Jersey and shot a series of aerial photographs of the devastated coastline. In July, Steinmetz returned to the area to see how things had changed

Dave Jordano: Detroit’s Fight to Survive: A Humanist’s Look at the Motor City (LightBox)

Kirk Crippens: Stockton, Bankcrupt (NPR Pictureshow)

Giles Price: Gettysburg, Readdressed (NYT magazine)

Jeremy Wade Shockley: My American West (burn magazine)

Secretary of State John Kerry laid out the case for additional American sanctions on Russia for promoting instability in Ukraine, warning on Thursday that Russia's "window to change course is closing” before sanctions are imposed on its economy. Adopting the tone of a prosecutor, Kerry detailed the interim Ukrainian government's compliance with last week's Geneva agreement to de-escalate the situation, adding "Russia has refused to take a single concrete step in the right direction.” Kerry firmly laid out alleged Russian actions in eastern Ukraine, from deploying special-operations forces and spies in plainclothes to funding and arming separatist groups. "Russia has put its faith in distraction, deception and destabilization" in eastern Ukraine, Kerry said. "What is happening in eastern Ukraine is a military operation that is well planned and organized." Kerry also rejected a range of claims from Russian President Vladimir Putin, including his assertion Thursday that the Internet is a project of the CIA, while criticizing the network Russia Today as a "propaganda bullhorn" for the Russian government's "fantasy" in Ukraine. "We have seen this movie before; we saw it most recently in Crimea," he said. For weeks American officials have been preparing to impose additional sanctions on Russia if it does not reverse course, working to reassure reluctant European allies that broad-based sanctions on sectors of Russia's economy may be necessary despite the costs to their own economies. On Thursday in Japan, President Barack Obama said sanctions against Russia were now "teed up" but did not specify what specific sanctions may be imposed. Earlier this month, Obama signed an Executive Order authorizing sanctions should they be needed on Russia's financial services, energy, mining, defense and engineering sectors. "Let me be clear," Kerry said. "If Russia continues in this direction, it will not only be a grave mistake, it will be an expensive mistake."
Benjamin Lowy

Ben Lowy: West to the Border (Backspaces)

David Harriman: Portraits of Illegal Immigrants Facing Deportation to Mexico (Feature Shoot)

Lauren Greenfield: I Want to Be a Disney Princess (Institute)

Chris McPherson: A lover and a fighter (CNN Photo blog) The life of an adult film star

Alicia Vera: This Is Not Just A Story About Prostitution (NPR Pictureshow)

Nina Berman: Fractured: Shale Play (Slate Behold) Fracking Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale region

Emily Berl: Portraits of L.A.’s Marilyn Monroe Impersonators (Feature Shoot)

Ramón Ruiz: Milton’s Last Year (CNN Photo blog) Documenting Parkinsons

Tony Fouhse: Live Through This: Documenting One Woman’s Struggle with Heroin (LightBox)

At an event at its San Francisco headquarters this evening, Pinterest announced a major new feature: Guided Search. As you've already figured out, it's a way to find things--images, products, recipes and more--which other people have pinned on the service. But search is traditionally text-oriented and meant to help you find something specific; Pinterest is largely visual and mostly about stumbling across stuff which you'll enjoy. So Guided Search isn't just a conventional search engine. And since 75 percent of people use Pinterest on mobile devices, it's designed to be something you do with one hand, minimal typing required. [caption id="attachment_76900" align="alignright" width="300"] Ben Silbermann of Pinterest announces Guided Search Harry McCracken / TIME[/caption]You do initiate a search by beginning to type a word. As you do, Pinterest suggests terms. And then it turns your query into tags which you can delete or add to, letting you refine or broaden your search. It also starts showing the names of Guides made up of pins relating to terms associated with your search; you can pull up any of these Guides with one tap. In a search shown in a video at the event, for instant, starting to type "Vespa" lets you quickly create tags for "Vespa" and "Vintage." It also shows you Guides such as "vintage," "scooters" and "helmets," letting you pivot from your original Vespa search into a board made up of items which might be closely related to the topic, or only tangentially associated with it. Besides Guided Search, the company announced a couple of other changes meant to help people discover pins. A feature called Custom Categories lets you browse through pins on niche topics which weren't formerly organized in one place. And Pinterest says that the Related Pins feature now does a smarter job of identifying interesting pins related to the one you're looking at. "There's a lot of pins and not a lot of time," said Pinterest co-founder and CEO Ben Silbermann at the event. "That's a problem. At Pinterest, we're making it easy to find just what you were looking for, or maybe what you didn't know you were looking for." Pinterest says that Guided Search will get better as more and more people use it. It's rolling out first in the service's apps for iPhone, iPad and Android, and should be available shortly. (I don't see it in the App Store on my iPhone just yet.)
Dietmar Eckell

Dietmar Eckell: Happy End (NBC News photo blog) Wrecked planes in forbidding landscapes

Peter Andrew: Aerial Freeways (Wired Raw File) Aerial freeway photos give engineers their due as geometric artists

Adrienne Grunwald: Regulars at a New Jersey Racetrack (Feature Shoot)

Hollis Bennett: Rocking the world’s ‘heaviest’ cruise (CNN Photo blog) Raging metalheads on a luxury cruise ship in the Gulf of Mexico

Adam Reign: Harlem’s Underground Ballrooms (CNN Photo blog)

Ian Willms: An Indigenous Way of Life Threatened by Oil Sands in Canada (NYT Lens)

Abbie Trayler-Smith

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The Big O (afinebeginning.com) Youth obesity in Wales

Marc Wilson: The Last Stand (Document Scotland) Physical remnants of the Second World War on the coastlines of the British Isles and northern Europe, focusing on military defence structures that remain and their place in the shifting landscape that surrounds them

Espen Rasmussen: Tough Guy competition (Guardian)

Kai Wiedenhöfer: A world divided by walls (CNN Photo blog)

Carolyn Drake: Tracking Medical Mystery (Photo Booth) Tracking mysterious, fatal kidney disease known as Balkan endemic nephropathy, in Croatia and Bosnia

Just Jin: Zone of Absolute Discomfort (Panos Pictures) Russia’s Far North | Work also on the photographer’s website here

Mikolaj Nowacki: Ode to a Polish River (NYT Lens)

Joachim Ladefoged: Festival Fringes (Photo Booth) In June, Ladefoged spent several days at the Roskilde Festival, in Denmark

David Ramos: Modern Day Gladiators Of Calcio Storico Fiorentino, Italy (Reportage by Getty Images)

Articles

reelhouse.org

Honor The Treaties (Reelhouse) A portrait of photographer Aaron Huey’s work on the Pine Ridge Reservation

Journalists in Syria Face Dangers of War and Rising Risk of Abduction (NYT)

What’s With the U.S. Media’s Aversion to Graphic Images? (The Atlantic)

War photography, war pornography – must we see blood to understand conflict? (Trust.org)

The month in photography – audio slideshow (Guardian) Cate Blanchett, Mars and Mass Observation feature in August’s guide to the top photography around the world, with works by Nan Goldin, William Eggleston, Walker Evans and Wolfgang Tillmans.

Per-Anders Pettersson / YouTube

Rainbow Transit – photobook showcase (YouTube) A brief tour through Per-Anders Pettersson’s book Rainbow Transit

Two Rivers by Carolyn Drake – photobook review (Guardian)

International Center of Photography Triennial, New York – review (The Financial Times)

"It's a great day," says Christian Berkey, CEO of Johnson Creek, a leading maker of electronic cigarette liquid based in Wisconsin. Berkey was referring to the FDA's issuance Thursday of proposed federal regulation of electronic cigarettes, a nascent industry that has grown to nearly $2 billion a year in U.S. sales. The move extended the FDA's authority to regulate new tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and hookah, among others. The FDA will take comments from various stakeholders on the rules over the next 75 days, and it could be a year or more before the regulations take effect, but today's proposed rules were a big step toward bringing the e-cig wild west under control. Currently, there are no federal rules governing e-cigarettes (though many states prohibit the sale to minors). "People worried the regulations would be unreasonable and onerous," says Berkey. "What we are seeing is they are not." Upon seeing the FDA's proposed rules today, the businesses are cheering. They see the proposal as a signal that the agency plans to take a business-friendly approach. Craig Weiss, the President and CEO of NJOY, a popular e-cigarette maker, was even more ecstatic in a press statement: "By resisting calls to regulate ahead of – and indeed in opposition to – the science and data, today the FDA has brought NJOY a giant step closer to achieving its corporate mission of obsoleting cigarettes." "I would say that there were certain people that went into this thinking the FDA would be a foe — an irrational, illogical opponent to these devices," says Miguel Martin, president of Logic Premium Electronic cigarettes, another top e-cigarette manufacturer, "[But] they’ve hit the ball right down the middle of the fairway. It is early, I might change opinion,but the original set up on the process seems extremely fair." The proposed regulations would ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and in vending machines where minors are allowed, require labels that list the ingredients and warn of the addictive properties of nicotine, and require companies to register new products with the FDA with a rigorous application process before they can put them on the market. The FDA has not yet proposed to ban flavors, which some anti-smoking advocates say appeal to kids, nor have they banned internet sales or advertising of e-cigarettes. And the FDA has given electronic cigarette companies a two-year window after the regulations go into effect to keep their products on the market while they apply to register new products. Currently, it is illegal for e-cigarette companies to make health claims that their products are healthier than regular cigarettes or can help people quit—a question that needs more thanks to a court decision ruling in 2009. But in today's deeming regulations, the FDA opened a pathway for companies to make health claims by submitting supporting research to the FDA. "I suspect that many companies are going to take a run at that," says Martin. The proposals are really just a starting point. Mitchell Zeller, the director of the Center for Tobacco Products at the FDA, called the proposed rules "foundational" today in a call with reporters, signaling that future regulations could ban or restrict things like internet sales, flavors, or advertising. And after the first two year grace period, e-cigarettes will still be subject to potentially long application processes for new products that might hurt business, say manufacturers. "It's not time for a victory lap," says Martin. "A lot can change."    
New Statesman, 26 July - 8 August 2013

Transition: Contested landscapes in South Africa (New Statesman) A photography essay including work by Philippe Chancel, Raphaël Dallaporta, Pieter Hugo, Santu Mofokeng, Zanele Muholi, Jo Ractliffe, Thabiso Sekgala and Alain Willaume.

AFP Haiti photographer Thony Belizaire dead at 54 (Fox News)

No Safe Places In Syria: Photographer Abducted At Media Center (NPR)

War of Images: Rolling Stone, Tsarnaev and the Branding of a Tragedy (LightBox)

Nic Dunlop’s Burma (BBC)

Bill Henson and the Dark Matter of Portraiture (LightBox)

Daniel Naudé’s best photograph – a feral Africanis dog (Guardian)

Daniel Beltrá’s best photograph: an Antarctic iceberg from above (Guardian)

Ali Ali / EPA

Wire Photographer Spotlight: Conflict and Conscience in Gaza by Ali Ali (LightBox)

Ed Drew’s Afghanistan: the first wet-plate conflict photos in 150 years (Guardian)

Eugene Richards: Jerry Berndt: A Remembrance (Photographer’s blog)

Featured photographer: Philipp Engelhorn (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Susana Girón (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Karen Miranda Rivadeneira (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: William Coupon (Verve Photo)

Nature Within the City: Bruce Davidson’s Los Angeles (LightBox)

Come for the Photographs, Stay for the Ranching (NYT) When Jean Laughton bought an inexpensive house in South Dakota to use as a base for a photography project, she had no idea she would stay indefinitely — or become a rancher

The Original New York Street Photographer, Alice Austin (The Atlantic Cities)

Louis Draper, Plucked From Obscurity (NYT Lens) The photographer Louis H. Draper, who, because he was black, was largely unknown outside of New York at the time of his death, is receiving some posthumous attention

Rosalind Solomon’s Photographs of the AIDS Epidemic (Photo Booth)

A New Look at Walker Evans’s ‘American Photographs’ (NYT Lens)

Sandy, the book: A look at the superstorm through iPhone photos (NBC News photo blog)

The Marginalized, Front and Center (NYT) Peter Baryshnikov is following in the footsteps of his father, Mikhail — but not with jetés and battements

Photographing Serengeti Lions Up Close Using Infrared, Robots and Drones (Peta Pixel)

Is the web photography’s friend or foe? (Guardian)

Wanted: The networked photojournalist (BJP)

17 Signs That You Were Alive Before Digital Photography (PhotoShelter blog)

Interviews and Talks

"It's a great day," says Christian Berkey, CEO of Johnson Creek, a leading maker of electronic cigarette liquid based in Wisconsin. Berkey was referring to the FDA's issuance Thursday of proposed federal regulation of electronic cigarettes, a nascent industry that has grown to nearly $2 billion a year in U.S. sales. The move extended the FDA's authority to regulate new tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and hookah, among others. The FDA will take comments from various stakeholders on the rules over the next 75 days, and it could be a year or more before the regulations take effect, but today's proposed rules were a big step toward bringing the e-cig wild west under control. Currently, there are no federal rules governing e-cigarettes (though many states prohibit the sale to minors). "People worried the regulations would be unreasonable and onerous," says Berkey. "What we are seeing is they are not." Upon seeing the FDA's proposed rules today, the businesses are cheering. They see the proposal as a signal that the agency plans to take a business-friendly approach. Craig Weiss, the President and CEO of NJOY, a popular e-cigarette maker, was even more ecstatic in a press statement: "By resisting calls to regulate ahead of – and indeed in opposition to – the science and data, today the FDA has brought NJOY a giant step closer to achieving its corporate mission of obsoleting cigarettes." "I would say that there were certain people that went into this thinking the FDA would be a foe — an irrational, illogical opponent to these devices," says Miguel Martin, president of Logic Premium Electronic cigarettes, another top e-cigarette manufacturer, "[But] they’ve hit the ball right down the middle of the fairway. It is early, I might change opinion,but the original set up on the process seems extremely fair." The proposed regulations would ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and in vending machines where minors are allowed, require labels that list the ingredients and warn of the addictive properties of nicotine, and require companies to register new products with the FDA with a rigorous application process before they can put them on the market. The FDA has not yet proposed to ban flavors, which some anti-smoking advocates say appeal to kids, nor have they banned internet sales or advertising of e-cigarettes. And the FDA has given electronic cigarette companies a two-year window after the regulations go into effect to keep their products on the market while they apply to register new products. Currently, it is illegal for e-cigarette companies to make health claims that their products are healthier than regular cigarettes or can help people quit—a question that needs more thanks to a court decision ruling in 2009. But in today's deeming regulations, the FDA opened a pathway for companies to make health claims by submitting supporting research to the FDA. "I suspect that many companies are going to take a run at that," says Martin. The proposals are really just a starting point. Mitchell Zeller, the director of the Center for Tobacco Products at the FDA, called the proposed rules "foundational" today in a call with reporters, signaling that future regulations could ban or restrict things like internet sales, flavors, or advertising. And after the first two year grace period, e-cigarettes will still be subject to potentially long application processes for new products that might hurt business, say manufacturers. "It's not time for a victory lap," says Martin. "A lot can change."    
CBSnews.com

Bruce Davidson (CBS) Civil Rights Movement photographer Davidson remembers pivotal moments forever captured on film

Alex Webb (Ideas Tap ) Webb on research and collaboration

Anders Petersen (The Klieg Light)

Pete Souza (LightBox) Obama’s Photographer Joins Instagram

Fred Ritchin (BJP) Meta-narrative: Ritchin on the future of photojournalism

NBA officials laid down the law with Charlotte’s Josh McRoberts on Thursday. After reviewing footage of the nasty elbow McRoberts slammed into Lebron James’s throat late in the fourth quarter of game 2 of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinal in Miami, league officials hit the Bobcat’s forward with a $20,000 fine and upgraded the initial foul to a Flagrant 2 excessive contact penalty. However, NBA officials stopped short of suspending McRoberts from Saturday’s playoff game with the Heat. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw115E_9hYo] "For me, real time, he was coming pretty fast down the lane,” said McRoberts following Wednesday’s game. “He's a real strong guy and I was just trying to stop him from first getting the shot up. It looked worse than it was." But according to James, he was “attacked in the lane” by McRoberts. "I got elbowed in the throat ... it's not a very good feeling,” said James during a post-game interview, according to ESPN. "The important thing is that we won the game." Miami currently two games up in the series against the Bobcats and will head to Charlotte on Saturday for game 3 of the opening round of the playoffs. [ESPN]
Dominic Nahr / Magnum Photos

Dominic Nahr (Vice)

Laurent Van der Stockt (Syriadeeply.org) The Photographer Who Crossed Obama’s ‘Red Line’

Jonathan Alpeyrie (La Journal de la Photographie) Interview with photographer Alpeyrie, held hostage in Syria for 81 days and freed on July 20

War Photographers: Michael Kamber and Louie Palu on Iraq and Afghanistan (Reason TV)

Ian Teh (Open Society Foundations) From the Yellow River to the East River

Fernando Moleres (CPN) Out of darkness: Moleres on Sierra Leone’s juvenile prisoners

Brian Storm (MediaStorm) Storm on Why You’ll Never Master Multimedia

Narciso Contreras (AP Youtube) On Covering Syria

Mark Seliger (NYT Lens) ‘Photography Is My Wife, Music Is My Mistress’ | Related article here

NBA officials laid down the law with Charlotte’s Josh McRoberts on Thursday. After reviewing footage of the nasty elbow McRoberts slammed into Lebron James’s throat late in the fourth quarter of game 2 of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinal in Miami, league officials hit the Bobcat’s forward with a $20,000 fine and upgraded the initial foul to a Flagrant 2 excessive contact penalty. However, NBA officials stopped short of suspending McRoberts from Saturday’s playoff game with the Heat. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw115E_9hYo] "For me, real time, he was coming pretty fast down the lane,” said McRoberts following Wednesday’s game. “He's a real strong guy and I was just trying to stop him from first getting the shot up. It looked worse than it was." But according to James, he was “attacked in the lane” by McRoberts. "I got elbowed in the throat ... it's not a very good feeling,” said James during a post-game interview, according to ESPN. "The important thing is that we won the game." Miami is currently two games up in the series against the Bobcats and will head to Charlotte on Saturday for game 3 of the opening round of the playoffs. [ESPN]
theaesthete.com

Jehad Nga (The Aesthete)

Tim Page (TIME) Veteran War Photographer Tim Page on Cambodia, Conflict and Getting High

Joseph Rodriguez (NYT Lens) Searching for Hope and Humanity in L.A.

Pete Muller (WPO YouTube)

Maxim Dondyuk (PDN) Inside a Cossack Youth Camp

Michele Palazzi (Slave Magazine)

Keith McManus (NPR Pictureshow) How Spring Break Changed My Life

Demetrius Freeman (NYT Lens) Be a Human First, Then Take the Photo

Jabin Botsford (NYT Lens) Diving for the Winning Shot

Spencer Murphy (The Stare Show)


Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


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