Eugene Richards
By Mikko Takkunen
March 25, 2013

Features and Essays

In an inventive, generous act, British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 pieces of footage from vintage newsreels to YouTube. If you stop by to check it out, you might have trouble pulling yourself away. It's a fascinating survey of what happened to the world from 1896-1976, told in bite-sized chunks. The collection is searchable, so I pulled up some choice bits relating to computers--especially how they got used to automate practically everything in the 1960s. This stuff was amazing at the time--especially, it seems, if you were a British newsreel announcer. 1949: An engineer teaches a machine to play noughts and crosses, better known to you and me as tic-tac-toe [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlNxBb_27CA] 1962: Pan Am and IBM sign a deal to computerize airplane reservations (watching this, it hit me: how the heck did they do them before computers?) [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XnBTzLX7wo] 1966: Rowland Emett, the Rube Goldberg of the U.K., demonstrates his homemade computer [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWor-_h26ow] 1967: During an outbreak of hoof and mouth disease, horse-racing fans settle for a computerized simulation [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sp_ndcKNZHM] 1967: The latest in automation--from the Auto-Typist to a pocket-sized dictation machine--gets demonstrated at the Business Efficiency Exhibition [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6lJ9gdG7UA] 1968: Honeywell demonstrates its "girl robot," Miss Honeywell, who, I regret to say, I suspect of being an elaborate hoax [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6e8mj7r7V60] 1968: A report on the Univac-powered Tinder of its day, complete with a Beatles soundtrack [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QW9fob1T6w] 1968: A Putney man composes music with his home computer, which happens to be a PDP-8 minicomputer [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gw-8lyZROIo] One thing I learned from watching all of these: Unless British Pathé sweetened its soundtracks, computers used to be noisy. I'm just as glad we no longer have to listen to that incessant clackety, clackety, clackety, clacking.
Eugene Richards for National Geographic

Eugene Richards: The New Oil Landscape (The National Geographic magazine) The fracking frenzy in North Dakota has boosted the U.S. fuel supply—but at what cost?

Alex Webb: The Ambiguous Island (The New York Times) Cuba

Alex Webb: Mahogany’s Last Stand (NGM) Illegal logging has all but wiped out Peru’s mahogany. Loggers are turning their chain saws on lesser known species critical to the health of the rain forest.

Evgenia Arbugaeva: Mammoth Tusk Hunters (NGM) Ancient hunters killed woolly mammoths for their meat. Today in Russia’s Arctic the search is on for their valuable tusks.

The ink wasn't yet dry on Thursday's diplomatic deal to calm the crisis in eastern Ukraine before the Obama administration began casting doubt on it. Secretary of State John Kerry, who helped broker the deal in Geneva with Russia, Ukraine, and the European Union, warned that it was only "words on paper." President Obama told reporters he didn't think "we can count on" the deal sticking. A day later, the agreement was already looking wobbly. Pro-Russian activists have refused to leave government buildings in eastern cities like Donetsk. Ukrainian forces paused what they call their "anti-terrorist" operations in the east, but didn't withdraw. And Washington and Moscow promptly began bickering over the agreement's meaning. "We're looking at all of this skeptically," a senior administration official tells TIME. All in all, the agreement is looking about as fragile as an Easter egg. Here are three reasons why. 1. Moscow and Washington disagree about the agreement While most reporting in the U.S. has focused on the idea that the Geneva pact would require pro-Russian militants to leave government buildings in Ukraine's east, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov made clear on Thursday that he expects something more: for the pro-Europe demonstrators in Kiev's central square, who initiated Ukraine's revolution this winter, to vacate city hall and other municipal buildings they have occupied. "It is impossible to solve the problem of illegally seized buildings in one region of Ukraine when the illegally seized buildings are not freed in another,” Lavrov said. The U.S. doesn't see things that way. "There’s no parallel whatsoever between the armed and illegal seizures of government buildings, streets, and public spaces in eastern Ukraine, which are clearly covered by the accord from yesterday, and the legal and peaceful protests," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Friday. Not a hopeful sign for the deal's staying power. 2. Ukrainian activists will ignore it A key passage of the Geneva deal states that All illegal armed groups must be disarmed; all illegally seized buildings must be returned to legitimate owners; all illegally occupied streets, squares and other public places in Ukrainian cities and towns must be vacated. On the pro-Russian side, agitators occupying government buildings in Donestk and other eastern cities and towns seem uninterested in those words. "Lavrov did not sign anything for us," Denis Pushilin, head of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic, told reporters. And why would he? Moscow has denied coordinating with the likes of Pushilin, even if almost no one believes it. Maybe Pushilin and his allies really are independent—and too fired up to be talked down now. Or maybe Moscow is playing a double-game, cutting deals with the U.S. while telling its Ukrainian operatives to hold firm. On the pro-European side, the demonstrators who have been encamped in central Kiev for months aren't about to abandon the tent-city infrastructure that dozens of them died to defend. It's not clear whether Moscow really expected that, or whether Lavrov's comments were knowingly obstinate. Either way, it's not going to happen without exponentially greater concessions than Russia made on Thursday. 3. Putin is saying ominous things While Thursday's deal commanded headlines, the Russian president's public remarks at a televised question-and-answer session in Moscow yesterday may have been more significant. As he fielded softball questions, a cocky-sounding Putin pointedly referred to eastern Ukraine as Novorossiya, which translates as "New Russia," and noted that much of eastern Ukraine once belonged to mother Russia. Here's the key passage: I would like to remind you that what was called Novorossiya (New Russia) back in the tsarist days – Kharkov, Lugansk, Donetsk, Kherson, Nikolayev and Odessa – were not part of Ukraine back then. These territories were given to Ukraine in the 1920s by the Soviet government. Why? Who knows. Putin loves to unpack historical causes for modern events. "Who knows" suggests he believes there is no good answer, and that Russia's surrender of eastern Ukraine was illegitimate. Yes, there were some positive signs in Putin's remarks. He said ethnic Russians in Ukraine "should be full citizens in their country," which at least implies that he envisions them under a non-Russian flag. He even drew a distinction between eastern Ukraine and his newly-acquired Crimea: "We must admit that the ethnic composition of Crimea differs from that of southeastern Ukraine," Putin said. While Crimea is overwhelmingly Russian, Putin conceded that eastern Ukraine is only about 50 percent so. On the downside, Putin pointedly reminded his audience that the Russian Duma has authorized him to use force in Ukraine. "I very much hope that I will not have to exercise this right," Putin said. Meanwhile, an estimated 40,000 Russian troops remain on Ukraine's eastern border. Thursday's agreement said nothing about their withdrawal.
Peter van Agtmael / Magnum

Peter van Agtmael: The Resisters (The New York Times Magazine) A village in West Bank testing limits of unarmed resistance

Lynsey Addario: Syrian Refugees (Feb.) | Syrian Refugees (March) (The New York Times) Little Relief in North Syria, Where Need Is Acute

Lynsey Addario: Syrian Civilians (NYT) Syrian Civilians, Empowering Themselves

Brian Sokol: The Most Important Thing (Panos Pictures) The most important thing Syrian refugees were able to take with them from home.

Bryan Denton: The Battle Over Syria (NYT)

Bryan Denton: For Shelter-Seeking Syrians, Home Is a Cave (NYT)

Alessio Romenzi: Female Syrian Fighter (Paris Match L’instant)

Guillem Vaille: Syrie. L’hiver du Kurdistan (Paris Match L’instant)

After troubled pop star Justin Bieber's spate of legal troubles earlier this year, the American people petitioned their government to deport the Canadian citizen from the United States. Nearly three months later, they have their response from the Obama administration: no comment. Almost 275,000 people signed a petition on the White House website in January to "Deport Justin Bieber and revoke his green card." "Sorry to disappoint, but we won’t be commenting on this one," the White House wrote in its response, posted Friday. "The We the People terms of participation state that, “to avoid the appearance of improper influence, the White House may decline to address certain procurement, law enforcement, adjudicatory, or similar matters properly within the jurisdiction of federal departments or agencies, federal courts, or state and local government in its response to a petition." But the White House did use the opportunity to plug its call for comprehensive immigration reform, which remains stalled in Congress. "Independent economists say immigration reform will grow our economy and shrink our deficits by almost $1 trillion in the next 20 years," the unsigned blogpost states. "For those of you counting at home, that’s 12.5 billion concert tickets—or 100 billion copies of Mr. Bieber’s debut album." On the substance of the matter, as we reported in January, Bieber's multiple alleged offenses are unlikely to warrant deportation. He resides in the United States on an O-1 visa, which is reserved for “individuals with an extraordinary ability in the arts or extraordinary achievement in motion picture or television industry," and only violent crimes and sentences longer than 1 year would result in a re-evaluation of his visa status.
Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR for TIME

Yuri Kozyrev: America’s Long Withdrawal from Afghanistan (LightBox)

Bryan Denton: Transition in Afghanistan (NYT)

Hossein Fatemi: Afghanistan: A Troubled Legacy (Panos)

Jan Grarup: Last Danish Soldiers in Helmand (Politiken) Afghanistan

.357 Magnum revolver
Jerome Delay / AP

Jerome Delay: Mali’s Invisible War (LightBox)

Joe Penney: Imaging Mali (Reuters Full Focus)

Kim Badawi: Chinese in Egypt: The Migratory Silk Road (Reportage by Getty Images)

Tyler Hicks: Kenya’s Rift Valley, Five Years After Election Violence (NYT)

Samuel James: Illicit Oil Industry in the Niger Delta (Lens blog)

Pierre Terdjman: Tunisie, le printemps fané (Paris Match L’instant)

Sarah Elliott: The Widows of Abu Salim Prison (Reportage) Libya

Kaet Holt: Defending Goma (zReportage)

Oded Balilty / AP

Oded Balilty: Waiting for a new pope (The Guardian)

Christopher Morris: Waiting for the New Pope (LightBox)

Christopher Morris: Conclave: A Short Film (LightBox)

Yuri Kozyrev: Bolshoi Ballet (LightBox)

Misha Friedman: Drama at the Bolshoi (Photo Booth)

Guillaume Herbaut: Bolschoi (Institute)

Sergey Ponomarev: Cossacks Expand Their Role in Russian Life (NYT)

Q. Sakamaki: Japan: Two Years After (Photo Booth)

David Chancellor: Rhino Protection (Institute)

Massimo Vitali: Brazil (NYT Magazine) Related article on the magazine’s 6th Floor blog

Christopher Anderson: Capitolio (El Mundo)

Jerome Sessini: Hugo Chavez Tribute (Magnum Photos)

Ed Kashi: Nicaragua (New Yorker Photo Booth)

Gustav Arvidsson: Land and Loss in Colombia (Lens blog)

Kim Badawi: Aldeia Maracanã (Reportage) Brazil

Miquel Dewever-Plana: Guatemala (Agence VU) Trial of a genocide

Gary Knight: On the frontlines: Start of the Iraq War (CNN Photo Photo blog)

Thorne Anderson: The Months Before The Iraq War (CNN Photo Photo blog)

Alexandra Boulat: Iraq (Paris Match L’instant photo blog)

The death toll on the South Korean ferry that capsized Wednesday has risen to 32, but officials said the number of dead will almost certainly rise as rescue teams struggle to find hundreds of missing passengers amidst strong currents and rain. Three bodies were recovered Saturday, the Associated Press reports. Around 270 passengers are still missing from the ferry, a large number of them high school students who were on a school trip to the holiday island of Jeju. The ferry's captain, Lee Joon-seok was arrested Saturday on charges of negligence of duty and violation of maritime law. Prosecutors bringing charges said Lee escaped the ship before the passengers, CBS reports. Two crew members were also arrested, including a rookie third mate who prosecutors said was unfamiliar with the strong current off the South Korean coast. Lee had four decades of experience at sea, but he was not the ferry's main captain and told reporters he was not on the bridge when the ferry began tilting. He also said that he told children on board to stay on the sinking ship for fear they would be swept out to sea in the strong, cold current, Reuters reports. By the time an evacuation order was finally made half an hour after it was recommended by Jeju Vessel Traffic Services Center, the ship had sloped too far on its side for people to escape the tight hallways and stairs inside the sinking vessel. Several survivors said they never heard the order to evacuate. Investigators said the accident occurred at a point along the route where the ship had to make a turn through islands with strong currents. Prosecutors are examining whether the third mate—said to be a rookie and new to the voyage—ordered a turn too sharp, causing the vessel to list. With the chances of survival among any of the missing passengers increasingly slim, the accident is shaping up to be the deadliest Korean maritime accident in 21 years. The 323 students from Danwon High School in Ansan were aged 16 and 17. The school's vice president, who was rescued as the children stayed aboard, hanged himself outside a gym in Jindo where relatives of survivors were holed up. The blue keel of the ferry was the last part of the boat to disappear underwater Friday night. [AP]  
Sara Naomi Lewkowicz

Sara Naomi Lewkowicz: A Portrait of Domestic Violence (LightBox) Photographer as Witness | Related: video

Mike Brodie: A Period of Juvenile Prosperity (LightBox) On Paris Match L’instant

Doug Dubois: The Lingering Light of Childhood (LightBox) Irish youth

Jocelyn Lee: Minor Stories (Institute)

Hiroyuki Ito: One Cat, Three Lives (Lens blog)

Kadir van Lohuizen: California’s ‘Little Baghdad’ (CNN Photo blog)

John Moore: Detained, Deported and Determined (The New York Times Lens blog)

John Moore: The Newest and Youngest Americans (Lens blog)

Kirsten Luce: Same Southern Border, Varied Views (NYT) Images of the United States’ southern border

Matt Eich: Sweetwater Rattlesnake Roundup (Photo Booth)

Jim Urquhart: Mars on Earth (TIME) A Look at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah

Gaia Squarci: Guided by Blindness (Lens blog) Photos of the visually impaired

Amy Lombard: Love and Sliders: Valentine’s Day at White Castle (TIME)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind / VII for National Geographic

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Return to River Town (NGM) In 1996 a Peace Corps volunteer arrived in Fuling, a sleepy town on the Yangtze, to teach English. He went back recently to find the landscape—and his former students—transformed.

Matthew Niederhauser: Counterfeit Paradises (Institute) China

Mark Leong: Welcome to Wuwucun, a Village in the City (China File) China

Noriko Hayashi: Unholy Matrimony (Panos Pictures) Kyrgyzstan

Mikel Aristregi: Way Down and Out in Ulan Bator (Lens blog) Mongolia

After troubled pop star Justin Bieber's spate of legal troubles earlier this year, the American people petitioned their government to deport the Canadian citizen from the United States. Nearly three months later, they have their response from the Obama administration: no comment. Almost 275,000 people signed a petition on the White House website in January to "Deport Justin Bieber and revoke his green card." "Sorry to disappoint, but we won’t be commenting on this one," the White House wrote in its response, posted Friday. "The We the People terms of participation state that, “to avoid the appearance of improper influence, the White House may decline to address certain procurement, law enforcement, adjudicatory, or similar matters properly within the jurisdiction of federal departments or agencies, federal courts, or state and local government in its response to a petition." But the White House did use the opportunity to plug its call for comprehensive immigration reform, which remains stalled in Congress. "Independent economists say immigration reform will grow our economy and shrink our deficits by almost $1 trillion in the next 20 years," the unsigned blogpost states. "For those of you counting at home, that’s 12.5 billion concert tickets—or 100 billion copies of Mr. Bieber’s debut album." On the substance of the matter, as we reported in January, Bieber's multiple alleged offenses are unlikely to warrant deportation. He resides in the United States on an O-1 visa, which is reserved for “individuals with an extraordinary ability in the arts or extraordinary achievement in motion picture or television industry," and only violent crimes and sentences longer than 1 year would result in a re-evaluation of his visa status.
James Nachtwey for TIME

James Nachtwey: Drug-Resistant TB in India (LightBox)

Daniel Berehulak: The Kumbh Mela in 2013 (LightBox)

Kuni Takahashi: India’s Child Labor Problem (NYT)

Munem Wasif: Shahbag Square (Agence VU) Bangladesh – Protests against war crimes

Allison Shelley: In Hindu Ritual, Nepali Women Are Banished Once A Month (NPR)

Frédéric Lecloux: Daily Epiphanies (Agence VU) Nepal

Pari Dukovic: Burma Wave (New Yorker Photo Booth)

Gratiane de Moustier: Domestic Workers in Indonesia (Lens blog)

When Italians immigrated in droves at the turn of the 20th century, they brought pizza to America—especially to the New York/New Jersey area. The first licensed pizzeria in the U.S. was Lombardi’s in the Nolita neighborhood of Manhattan. Still open despite a ten-year hiatus and a move down the street, it is considered the father of New York pizza and directly spawned or inspired longstanding greats like Totonno’s, Patsy’s, Grimaldi’s and Di Fara.  
Daniel Etter

Daniel Etter: Fortress Europe (Zeit) Fortress Europe is a photographic journey along the European Union’s external borders, telling the stories of undocumented migrants.

Alexandros Demetriades: Divided Cyprus (Lens blog)

George Georgiou: Turkey’s Changing Landscape (CNN Photo blog)

Riverboom: Like a Turk (Institute)

Ivor Prickett: Kurdistan – 10 Years On (Panos Pictures)

Amos Chapple: Inside Iran (The Boston Globe Big Picture blog)

Simon Norfolk: Failed Ambitions: Spain’s Economic Collapse (Photo Booth)

Simon Norfolk: God’s Light Show (The New York Times Magazine)

Jim Naughten: Conflict and Costume in Namibia (LightBox) Also on The Guardian here

George Steinmetz: Desert Air (MSNBC)

Robert Burley: The Disappearance of Darkness (Lens blog) The Disappearance of Darkness

René Burri: Impossible Réminiscences (Paris Match L’instant photo blog)

Annie Ling: Ousted by the City, Tenants Seek a Home (Lens blog)

Nadia Shira Cohen and Paulo Siqueira: Where Home Is an Elusive Fantasy (Lens blog)

Louis Quail: The Desk Job (Wired Raw File photo blog)

Robin Schwartz: Amelia and the Animals (Photo Booth)

Articles

The first time I wrote about Lytro was back in October of 2011, when it announced its first product. I said it was "like no other camera you've seen before." And it wasn't. The $399 gizmo looked more like a pocket-sized kaleidoscope than a camera, and though it lacked many features standard on all other cameras, it used light-field photography to create what it called "living pictures," which you could refocus after you shot them. Since then, the company has added several new features--such as filters and an iPhone app--but the camera itself has remained the same. And even though it's still the only light-field camera, it faces increasing competition from smartphone apps which perform rough approximations of its refocusing trick--some badly, but some, such as Google's Android camera app, surprisingly well. Today, Lytro is announcing its second camera, the Lytro Illum. Rather than being what you might expect--an improved model at the same price point, or maybe even a lower one--it's a radically different beast. Rather than going after garden-variety consumers, the Illum targets what Lytro calls "creative pioneers," who are professionals and passionate amateurs who are serious about staying on the cutting edge of storytelling technology. So serious in fact, that they're willing to pay $1600 for this camera--four times the cost of the original model, which remains on the market. The basic technology remains the same: Like the original Lytro, the Illum captures the direction of light in a scene as well as its color and intensity, giving it a fully three-dimensional understanding of the photos you take. That's why you refocus photos after they're taken and nudge them back and forth to see them from slightly different perspectives. But just about anything that the company could change, it did change. That starts with the form factor. The first Lytro looked a bit like a squared-off, pocket-sized kaleidoscope, but this one looks like...well, a camera. A professional one with a large lens and a 4" touchscreen display and the back and a shutter button where you'd expect it to be. It also has a slot for SD memory cards and a removable battery, two features absent in the original mode. And it sports GPS and Wi-Fi, two features which aren't yet standard fare on serious cameras. Shooting with the first Lytro is a bit of a trial-and-error job: The screen is dinky, grainy and hard to see outside, and it's tough to tell whether your photo will have enough depth of field to make for striking refocusing effects. The Illum's screen looks big and beautiful, and there's a neat dynamic preview that outlines the people and objects in your scene, giving you a better idea of the end result before you press the shutter. Lytro doesn't measure images in megapixels. Instead it uses megarays, and while it's hard for us mere mortals to understand exactly what that means, the Illum's sensor captures forty of them, vs. the first Lytro's eleven. Photos are now in a standard 3:2 aspect ratio instead of the earlier model's Polaroid-like square format, and Lytro's sample images, at least, are crisper and more detailed than previous living pictures. Speaking of sample images, here they are. You can refocus and zoom around them; press the arrow icons to move between photos. [protected-iframe id="e4ac4eb653a0f9f73ca8618a097578bb-1359921-16008727" info="https://pictures.lytro.com/lytro/albums/149429/embed?token=6cb04136-c43 a-11e3-9416-22000a8b14ce" width="600" height="487" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""]
Alex Majoli / Magnum

A Decade of War in Iraq: The Images That Moved Them Most (LightBox)

Photographers’ notebook: Iraq war (Reuters Full Focus)

Photographers’ Oral History of the Iraq War (Lens blog)

The 10 Most Iconic Images from Iraq (Foreign Policy)

Ten Years On: Photojournalists on War (Photo Booth)

NOOR: Covering Iraq (NOOR website)

10th Anniversary of The Start of the Iraq War (Magnum Photos)

Iraq, Ten Years Ago and Now (The New Yorker)

The Iraq War, 10 years on (CNN)

War in Iraq — a look back 10 years later (Los Angeles Times Framed photo blog)

Their War at Home : Iraqi War Photographers (The New York Times)

Faces of war: hear the stories behind iconic images of Iraq conflict (Guardian)

Iraq War’s 10th Anniversary: Occupation and Insurgency (The Atlantic)

Chip Somodevilla’s Haunting Iraq War Anniversary Photo from Arlington (BagNewsNotes)

Bill Neely: Fred Nérac, my ITN colleague, disappeared in a warzone. The joke we shared still haunts me (The Observer)

The ink wasn't yet dry on Thursday's diplomatic deal to calm the crisis in eastern Ukraine before the Obama administration began casting doubt on it. Secretary of State John Kerry, who helped broker the deal in Geneva with Russia, Ukraine, and the European Union, warned that it was only "words on paper." President Obama told reporters he didn't think "we can count on" the deal sticking. A day later, the agreement was already looking wobbly. Pro-Russian activists have refused to leave government buildings in eastern cities like Donetsk. Ukrainian forces declared their "anti-terrorist" operations in the east "inactive," but did not withdraw from the area. And Washington and Moscow promptly began bickering over the agreement's meaning. "We're looking at all of this skeptically," a senior administration official tells TIME. All in all, the agreement is looking about as fragile as an Easter egg hunts. There are three main reasons for that. 1. Moscow and Washington disagree about the agreement While most reporting in the U.S. has focused on the idea that the Geneva pact would require pro-Russian militants to leave government buildings in Ukraine's east, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov made clear on Thursday that he expects something more: for the pro-Europe demonstrators in Kiev's central square, who initiated Ukraine's revolution this winter, to vacate city hall and other municipal buildings they have occupied. "It is impossible to solve the problem of illegally seized buildings in one region of Ukraine when the illegally seized buildings are not freed in another,” Lavrov said. The U.S. doesn't see things that way. "There’s no parallel whatsoever between the armed and illegal seizures of government buildings, streets, and public spaces in eastern Ukraine, which are clearly covered by the accord from yesterday, and the legal and peaceful protests," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Friday. The dispute does not augur well for the deal's staying power. 2. Ukrainian activists will ignore it On the pro-Russian side, agitators in Donestk and other eastern cities and towns seem uninterested in a document signed in Geneva. "Lavrov did not sign anything for us," the head of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic told reporters there Friday. That could be a sign that Moscow has instructed its allies to ignore the agreement. It's also possible that, having unleashed nationalist passions, Putin can't simply reel them back in. On the pro-European side, the demonstrators who have been embedded in Kiev's Maidan for months aren't about to abandon the tent-city infrastructure that dozens of them died to defend. It's not clear whether Moscow really expected that, or whether Lavrov's comments were knowingly obstinate. Either way, it's not going to happen without exponentially greater concessions than Russia made on Thursday. 3. Putin is saying ominous things While Thursday's deal commanded headlines, the Russian president's public remarks at a televised question-and-answer session in Moscow yesterday may have been more significant. As he fielded softball questions, a cocky-sounding Putin pointedly referred to eastern Ukraine as Novorossiya, which translates as "New Russia," and noted that much of eastern Ukraine once belonged to mother Russia. Here's the key passage: I would like to remind you that what was called Novorossiya (New Russia) back in the tsarist days – Kharkov, Lugansk, Donetsk, Kherson, Nikolayev and Odessa – were not part of Ukraine back then. These territories were given to Ukraine in the 1920s by the Soviet government. Why? Who knows. Putin loves to unpack historical causes for modern events. "Who knows" suggests he believes there is no good answer, and that Russia's surrender of eastern Ukraine was illegitimate. Yes, there were some positive signs in Putin's remarks. He said ethnic Russians in Ukraine "should be full citizens in their country," which at least implies that he envisions them under a non-Russian flag. He even drew a distinction between eastern Ukraine and his newly-acquired Crimea: "We must admit that the ethnic composition of Crimea differs from that of southeastern Ukraine," Putin said. While Crimea is overwhelmingly Russian, Putin conceded that eastern Ukraine is only about 50 percent so. On the downside, Putin pointedly reminded his audience that the Russian Duma has authorized him to use force in Ukraine. "I very much hope that I will not have to exercise this right," Putin said. Meanwhile, an estimated 40,000 Russian troops remain on Ukraine's eastern border. Thursday's agreement said nothing about their withdrawal.
Thomas Rassloff / EPA

Syria: the story behind one of the most shocking images of the war (Guardian)

Behind the Picture: Aleppo’s River of Death (LightBox)

Richard Engel Reveals a Diary of His Syrian Kidnapping—and How His Captors Terrorized Their Victims (Vanity Fair)

Love letter to photographer Remi Ochlik killed in Syria (BBC) Audio | A Love Letter from Emilie Blachère to Rémi Ochlik (La Lettre de la Photographie)

French photographer Olivier Voisin dies in Syria (RFI English)

Photographer Olivier Voisin killed in Syria spoke of adrenaline (AP Big Story blog)

To make freelancing safer, young foreign journalists need more support and less sneering (The Independent)

Natalie Naccache—The New York Times/Redux

“A Day Without News?”: Raising Awareness of the Perils of Reporting (LightBox)

Worldwide campaign launched to support conflict photographers and journalists (British Journal of Photography)

Killing the messenger, when journalists become targets (Amanpour blog on CNN)

The Missing Journalists of Syria’s War: The Struggle to Save Those Who Bear Witness (TIME)

It’s More Dangerous Than Ever to Be a Female War Reporter (The Atlantic)

It’s Tough to be a Reporter in a War Zone, for Both Men and Women (The Atlantic)

Running Toward Danger, Syria’s Citizens Become Journalists (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Syrian Conflict Transforms Woman From English Teacher into War Photographer (PetaPixel)

War & Fashion (CNN)

The Magnificent One: Philip Jones Griffiths (Donna Ferrato’s Vimeo)

Arrivals and Departures : Behind the scenes with Magnum Photographer Jacob Aue Sobol (Youtube)

Covering The Human Toll of Europe’s Economic Statistics (Lens blog)

National Geographic, Unpublished (The Washington Post) Unpublished photographs from National Geographic assignments

Documentary Chris Hondros planned (Greek America) Documentary’s website

Finding Vivian Maier – Official Movie Trailer (Youtube)

Paola Kudacki for TIME

At Close Proximity With War and Truth (Huffington Post) Alan Huffman’s Tim Hetherington biography ‘Here I Am’ reviewed

War photographer Tim Hetherington felt he had pushed his luck on day he died (The Telegraph)

Photo exhibit is witness to wars (Los Angeles Times) Photographers with works in a traveling exhibit at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles called ‘War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath’ talk about the images and life on the frontlines.

At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston (The Telegraph)

‘In China, a Vast Chasm Between the Rich and the Rest’ by Sim Chi Yin (NYT)

To See the World: Marc Riboud’s Eye of the Traveler (LightBox)

A Second Look: Chim’s Children of War (LightBox) Chim: A Vivid Retrospective of Europe (Lens blog)

Elvis in the Beginning: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer (LightBox)

Happy 80th Birthday, Nina Simone: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer (LightBox)

Gordon Parks’s Harlem Family Revisited (Lens blog)

A Profound Beauty: Peter Hujar’s Timeless Portraits (LightBox)

Massif Management: Surf Photographers (Photo Booth)

Saving Face: The Portraits of Zanele Muholi (LightBox)

A Mexican Photographer, Overshadowed but Not Outdone (Lens Blog)

Here Far Away: The Visual Fables of Pentti Sammallahti (LightBox)

Peeking Inside Health Care: Nick Veasey’s Medical X-Rays (LightBox)

Chinese Family Memories, Recycled (Lens blog)

Bringing Color to Presidents Past (Lightbox)

Man who helped get WWII photo published dies (USA Today)

Jonathan Olley

Real Photographer, Fake War: Jonathan Olley and Zero Dark Thirty (LightBox)

Guglielmo Galvin obituary (Guardian)

Contest to Name a Lawn Ends as It Gets Personal (The New York Times)

The Lens Rises in Stature (The New York Times)

The Role of the Camera and the Photos in Domestic Abuse: Maggie, Shane and Sara Lewkowicz (BagNewsNotes)

What It Feels Like To Be Photographed In A Moment Of Grief (NPR)

Francis Hodgson: ‘Submerged Trailer, Salton Sea, California’ by Richard Misrach (The Financial Times)

The 10 best … photographic self-portraits (Guardian)

Ed Koch’s Unconventional Portrait (NYT magazine 6th Floor blog)

Colombia’s Traveling Storyteller (Lens blog)

Out of Eden, Journal II — Expect the Unexpected by John Stanmeyer (The Photo Society)

National Geographic photojournalist Stanmeyer follows the first humans out of Africa (Berkshire Eagle)

Scientists have discovered several species of insect in a cave in Brazil that display what they say are the world’s first discovered instances of female “penises.” The four species of insect, which live in dry Brazilian caves and feed on bat guano, display something scientists are calling an “evolutionary novelty”: full-on, anatomical sex-role reversal. Though rare, instances of sex-role reversal have been found in other animals before, but this is the first time the “intromittent organ,”—the male organ—is reversed, Reuters reports. During mating, the female receives sperm by inserting a penis-like organ, which scientists call a gynosome, into the male, which they can hold in place against the male’s will. “Because the female anchoring force is very strong, a male’s strong resistance may cause damage to his genitalia,” said entomologist Kazunori Yoshizawa. “Therefore, it is very likely that entire mating processes are controlled actively by females, whereas males are rather passive.” The sex-role reversed insects, which all belong to the genus Neotragla, may be on to something—mating sessions can last from 40 to up to 70 hours long. [Reuters]      
Paul Hansen / Dagens Nyheter

The harrowing story behind the World Press Photo of the year (The Washington Post)

First place photographers react to winning World Press Photo prizes (CNN photo blog)

Why Do Photo Contest Winners Look Like Movie Posters? (PhotoShelter)

Magnum’s Morbid Symptoms (John Edwin Mason blog)

When Reality Isn’t Dramatic Enough: Misrepresentation in a World Press and Picture of the Year Winning Photo (BagNewsNotes)

Prize-Winning Photos and Lingering Questions (Lens blog)

Paolo Pellegrin Responds To Claim Of Misrepresented Winning World Press, POYi Photos (NPPA)

Just Make It Happen (Kenneth Jarecke blog)

2013 – the year we lost sight of what photography can achieve (Editorial Photographers UK)

The business of photojournalism (BBC)

Swiss photographer in legal battle to publish photobook (BJP)

Featured photographer: Dave Anderson (Verve Photo blog)

Featured photographer: Srinivas Kuruganti (Verve)

Featured photographer: Andrew Quilty (Verve)

Featured photographer: Elijah Hurwitz (Verve)

Marksta adds full IPTC metadata functionality to its popular watermarking app (British Journal of Photography)

LOOK3 : Festival of The Photograph, Charlottesville, June 13-15, 2013 (LOOK3)

Photoreporter festival comes back for its second edition, unveils winning projects (BJP)

What the LagosPhoto Festival is doing for photography in Nigeria (BJP)

Ex-Gamma photographer in legal woes over ownership of her images (BJP)

Time-Lapse Shows the Passing of a Day in New York City in 100,000+ Photos (PetaPixel)

New Sports Illustrated Photography Director: Brad Smith (NPPA)

Washington Post photographer on ‘impressionist’ shot landing on front page (Poynter)

Interviews and Talks

Pizza Hut made waves with stuffed crust pizza in 1995 (though others claim to have invented the novelty much earlier). Soon, crusts from coast to coast were getting the cheese treatment, and Pizza Hut went on to introduce wacky hits overseas, from hot-dog stuffing in the U.K. to cheeseburger stuffing in the Middle East to Marmite stuffing in New Zealand.  
Goran Tomasevic / Reuters

Goran Tomasevic (Reuters Photographers blog) Tomasevic on ‘the day Saddam Fell’

Yunghi Kim (NatGeo) First Person: Sneaking Into Iraq, 10 Years Ago | Ten years after the Iraq war began, a photographer recalls a harrowing trip.

Iraq 10 Years by Sean Smith (BBC)

David Gilkey (NPR) 10 Years Ago, A Night Vision Of The Iraq Invasion

Heathcliff O’Malley (Telegraph) Iraq 10 years on: photographing the war

Lynsey Addario (Lens blog) on daily life in Syria’s civil war

Lynsey Addario (The Huffington Post Live)

Goran Tomasevic (Reuters) Insight: Battle for Damascus: frozen but bloody

After troubled pop star Justin Bieber's spate of legal troubles earlier this year, the American people petitioned their government to deport the Canadian citizen from the United States. Nearly three months later, they have their response from the Obama administration: no comment. Almost 275,000 people signed a petition on the White House website in January to "Deport Justin Bieber and revoke his green card." "Sorry to disappoint, but we won’t be commenting on this one," the White House wrote in its response, posted Friday. "The We the People terms of participation state that, “to avoid the appearance of improper influence, the White House may decline to address certain procurement, law enforcement, adjudicatory, or similar matters properly within the jurisdiction of federal departments or agencies, federal courts, or state and local government in its response to a petition." But the White House did use the opportunity to plug its call for comprehensive immigration reform, which remains stalled in Congress. "Independent economists say immigration reform will grow our economy and shrink our deficits by almost $1 trillion in the next 20 years," the unsigned blogpost states. "For those of you counting at home, that’s 12.5 billion concert tickets—or 100 billion copies of Mr. Bieber’s debut album." On the substance of the matter, as we reported in January, Bieber's multiple alleged offenses are unlikely to warrant deportation. He resides in the United States on an O-1 visa, which is reserved for “individuals with an extraordinary ability in the arts or extraordinary achievement in motion picture or television industry," and only violent crimes and sentences longer than 1 year would result in a re-evaluation of his visa status.
Bernat Armangué / AP

Bernat Armangué (BJP) “Stories are about people”

Giles Duley (Guardian) ‘I lost three limbs in Afghanistan, but had to go back … ‘ | Audio here

Jared Moossy (Nowhere magazine)

Janine di Giovanni (TED.com) What I saw in the war

Sebastião Salgado (Wanderlust) Salgado on man’s surprising relationship with nature

Steve McCurry pt1, pt2, pt3, pt4 (The Sartorialist)

William Klein (Lens blog)

William Allard (Youtube)

Matthieu Paley (PhotoShelter blog) Climbing to the Roof of the World

Rebecca Norris Webb (Flak Photo)

Rena Effendi (We Are OCA) Her life as a photographer

Saul Leiter (Lightbox) A Casual Conversation with Saul Leiter

Standing in a rigid hull inflatable boat launched from the Australian Navy ship HMAS Perth, Leading Seaman, Boatswain's Mate, William Sharkey searches for possible debris in the southern Indian Ocean in the continuing search for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 in this picture released by the Australian Defence Force April 17, 2014.
David Guttenfelder / AP

David Guttenfelder (NPR) Live From North Korea, An Instagram Feed

Phil Bicker (PDN) Mining the Wires at TIME

Keith W. Jenkins (Canon Professional Network) On the evolution of multimedia

Francis Hodgson (jcoelberg.com) An Extended Conversation with Francis Hodgson

Stephanie Sinclair (National Geographic) on millions of young girls forced into marriage

Evgenia Arbugaeva (National Geographic)

Antonin Kratochvil (A Photo Editor) Kratochvil on his imaging style

Christopher Morris (The Los Angeles Times Framed photo blog)

David Burnett (BHPhotoVideo Youtube) Shooting Film in the Digital Age and Other Conundrums | Burnett on BH Insights blog here

Annie Leibovitz (Youtube) Young Leibovitz talks about her work

Christopher Anderson (Vice)

Alessandra Sanguinetti (Leica blog)

Anders Petersen (Gomma magazine)

Jean Gaumy (Leica Youtube)

Simon Roberts

Simon Roberts (Guardian) Simon Roberts’ best photograph: the London 2012 Olympics from above

Ken Grant (Guardian) Ken Grant’s best photograph: a child on the Merseyside coast

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (EFTI School of Photography Vimeo)

Kathryn Cook (Alexia Foundation) Cook on her work documenting the Armenian Genocide in Turkey

Michael Wolf (Foam on Youtube)

Ron Haviv (Takepart.com) “There Is a Need for Photojournalists”

Peter diCampo (Salon) Introducing Africa to the OMG crowd

Ben Lowy (EyeEm blog) War Through an iPhone Lens.

Brad Vest (Lens blog)

Daniel Rodrigues (Lens blog)

Mary McCartney (Guardian) McCartney on photography: ‘I’ve always been drawn to strong women’

Siphiwe Sibeko (Reuters) Inside the Pistorius courthouse

Alessandro Di Meo (BBC) Lightning really does strike twice

Andy Adams (LA Times Framed photo blog)

Maja Daniels (Thisisthewhat.com) 10 minutes with Maja Daniels

Olivia Bee (Guardian) ‘People don’t take me seriously – until they see me work’

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography : Deadline May 31, 2013

Henri Cartier-Bresson International Award : Deadline April 15th, 2013.

The Inge Morath Award 2013 : Deadline April 30, 2013

Emerging Photographer Fund : Deadline May 13, 2013 | $15,000 will be awarded to emerging photographers through the Magnum Foundation

The City of Levallois Photography Award : Deadline May 20, 2013

dvafoto’s Deadline Calendar – photo contests and calls for entry

Photo Contests and Grants Calendar (Jasminedefoore.com)

2013 Photography Grants & Sponsorships List (Pixiq)

The first time I wrote about Lytro was back in October of 2011, when it announced its first product. I said it was "like no other camera you've seen before." And it wasn't. The $399 gizmo looked more like a pocket-sized kaleidoscope than a camera, and though it lacked many features standard on all other cameras, it used light-field photography to create what it called "living pictures," which you could refocus after you shot them. Since then, the company has added several new features--such as filters and an iPhone app--but the camera itself has remained the same. And even though it's still the only light-field camera, it faces increasing competition from smartphone apps which perform rough approximations of its refocusing trick--some badly, but some, such as Google's Android camera app, surprisingly well. Today, Lytro is announcing its second camera, the Lytro Illum. Rather than being what you might expect--an improved model at the same price point, or maybe even a lower one--it's a radically different beast. Instead of going after garden-variety consumers, the Illum targets what Lytro calls "creative pioneers," who are professionals and passionate amateurs who are serious about staying on the cutting edge of storytelling technology. So serious in fact, that they're willing to pay $1600 for this camera--four times the cost of the original model, which remains on the market. The basic technology remains the same: Like the original Lytro, the Illum captures the direction of light in a scene as well as its color and intensity, giving it a fully three-dimensional understanding of the photos you take. That's why you refocus photos after they're taken and nudge them back and forth to see them from slightly different perspectives. But just about anything that the company could change, it did change. That starts with the form factor. The first Lytro looked a bit like a squared-off, pocket-sized kaleidoscope, but this one looks like...well, a camera. A professional one with a large lens and a 4" touchscreen display and the back and a shutter button where you'd expect it to be. It also has a slot for SD memory cards and a removable battery, two features absent in the original mode. And it sports GPS and Wi-Fi, two features which aren't yet standard fare on serious cameras. The company also gave this camera a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, the same one used in Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone. It says the new chip is 2000 times more powerful than the mundane one in its original camera. Shooting with the first Lytro is a bit of a trial-and-error job: The screen is dinky, grainy and hard to see outside, and it's tough to tell whether your photo will have enough depth of field to make for striking refocusing effects. The Illum's screen looks big and beautiful, and there's a neat dynamic preview that outlines the people and objects in your scene, giving you a better idea of the end result before you press the shutter. The new lens is a custom-design with 8x optical zoom capability (30mm-250mm equivalent) with a constant F-stop of f/2. Lytro doesn't measure images in megapixels. Instead it uses megarays, and while it's hard for us mere mortals to understand exactly what that means, the Illum's sensor captures forty of them, vs. the first Lytro's eleven. Photos are now in a standard 3:2 aspect ratio instead of the earlier model's Polaroid-like square format, and Lytro's sample images, at least, are crisper and more detailed than previous "living pictures." Speaking of sample images, here they are. You can refocus and zoom around them; press the arrow icons to move between photos. [protected-iframe id="e4ac4eb653a0f9f73ca8618a097578bb-1359921-16008727" info="https://pictures.lytro.com/lytro/albums/149429/embed?token=6cb04136-c43 a-11e3-9416-22000a8b14ce" width="600" height="487" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""] As before, you can share Lytro photos online (like I just did above) and view them in
Daniel Berehulak / Getty Images

World Press Photo Winners (Word Press Photo) Related: The World’s Best News Photos for 2012 (Lens blog) Swedish photographer Paul Hansen wins 56th World Press Photo (BJP)

World Press Photo announces Multimedia contest winners (BJP)

POYi Photographer of the Year: Paolo Pellegrin (Paolo)

PDN’s 30 2013 : New and Emerging Photographers to Watch (PDN)

International Center of Photography Announces 2013 Infinity Awards Winners (Reuters)

The ink wasn't yet dry on Thursday's diplomatic deal to calm the crisis in eastern Ukraine before the Obama administration began casting doubt on it. Secretary of State John Kerry, who helped broker the deal in Geneva with Russia, Ukraine, and the European Union, warned that it was only "words on paper." President Obama told reporters he didn't think "we can count on" the deal sticking. A day later, the agreement was already looking wobbly. Pro-Russian activists have refused to leave government buildings in eastern cities like Donetsk. Ukrainian forces paused what they call their "anti-terrorist" operations in the east, but didn't withdraw. And Washington and Moscow promptly began bickering over the agreement's meaning. "We're looking at all of this skeptically," a senior administration official tells TIME. All in all, the agreement is looking about as fragile as an Easter egg. Here are three reasons why. 1. Moscow and Washington disagree about the agreement While most reporting in the U.S. has focused on the idea that the Geneva pact would require pro-Russian militants to leave government buildings in Ukraine's east, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov made clear on Thursday that he expects something more: for the pro-Europe demonstrators in Kiev's central square, who initiated Ukraine's revolution this winter, to vacate city hall and other municipal buildings they have occupied. "It is impossible to solve the problem of illegally seized buildings in one region of Ukraine when the illegally seized buildings are not freed in another,” Lavrov said. The U.S. doesn't see things that way. "There’s no parallel whatsoever between the armed and illegal seizures of government buildings, streets, and public spaces in eastern Ukraine, which are clearly covered by the accord from yesterday, and the legal and peaceful protests," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Friday. The dispute hardly augurs well for the deal's endurance. 2. The people who matter are ignoring it A key passage of the Geneva deal states that All illegal armed groups must be disarmed; all illegally seized buildings must be returned to legitimate owners; all illegally occupied streets, squares and other public places in Ukrainian cities and towns must be vacated. On the pro-Russian side, agitators occupying government buildings in Donestk and other eastern cities and towns seem uninterested in those words. "Lavrov did not sign anything for us," Denis Pushilin, head of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic, told reporters. And why would he? Moscow has denied coordinating with the likes of Pushilin, even if almost no one believes it. The question is whether Pushilin and his ilk are truly independent—or just obeying Moscow's orders to ignore the deal. On the pro-European side, the demonstrators who have been encamped in central Kiev for months aren't about to abandon the tent-city infrastructure where dozens of them died. It's not clear whether Moscow ever considered that a realistic outcome of the Geneva deal or is simply drawing the equivalence to defend the antics of its supporters in the east. But almost nothing Moscow does can disband Kiev's Maidan. 3. Putin is saying ominous things Though it was overshadowed by Thursday's deal, the Russian president's public remarks at a televised question-and-answer session in Moscow yesterday may have been more significant. As he fielded softball questions, a cocky-sounding Putin pointedly referred to eastern Ukraine as Novorossiya—which translates as "New Russia"—and noted that it once didn't belong to Ukraine at all: I would like to remind you that what was called Novorossiya (New Russia) back in the tsarist days – Kharkov, Lugansk, Donetsk, Kherson, Nikolayev and Odessa – were not part of Ukraine back then. These territories were given to Ukraine in the 1920s by the Soviet government. Why? Who knows. Putin loves to unpack the historical roots of modern events. "Who knows" suggests he believes there is no good answer to his question, and that Russia's surrender of eastern Ukraine was illegitimate. There were some positive signs. Putin said ethnic Russians in Ukraine "should be full citizens in their country," which implies a future outside of Russian borders. He even drew a distinction between eastern Ukraine and Crimea, to which he helped himself: "We must admit that the ethnic composition of Crimea differs from that of southeastern Ukraine," Putin said. While Crimea is overwhelmingly Russian, Putin conceded that eastern Ukraine is, by his estimate, only about 50 percent so. That said, Putin pointedly reminded his audience that the Russian Duma has authorized him to use force in Ukraine. "I very much hope that I will not have to exercise this right," Putin said. Meanwhile, an estimated 40,000 Russian troops remain on Ukraine's eastern border. Thursday's agreement said nothing about their withdrawal.
Goran Tomasevic / Reuters

Days Japan International Photojournalism Awards 2013 Winners (Days Japan)

Announcing the 2013 Alexia Foundation Profession and Student Grant Winners (Alexia Foundation)

Alession Romenzi, Winner of Prix Lucas Dolega (Paris Match L’instant)

Panos photographer Robin Hammond wins 2013 FotoEvidence Book Award (BJP)

Photographer Louie Palu wins White House awards (Foreign Policy blog)

In pictures: Terry O’Neill TAG Award (BBC)

Times/Canon Young Photographer of the Year winner is Rob Stothard (The Times)

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