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5 Ways to Celebrate World Water Day

Mar 21, 2015
TIME Health
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Sunday is World Water Day, a United Nations initiative to celebrate clean water and bring attention to those who don't have enough of it. A new report released ahead of World Water Day warns about a looming shortage, and centers on this year's theme: water and sustainable development.

Here are five ways to celebrate World Water Day

Learn about poop water

First charcoal juice becomes a thing, and now poop water? Hey, Bill Gates drinks it—thanks to a new machine called the Omniprocessor that literally transforms waste into water through a steam engine. On his blog, Gates writes about drinking a "delicious" fresh glass of it and marvels at the possibilities to improve sanitation in low-income countries. "The processor wouldn’t just keep human waste out of the drinking water; it would turn waste into a commodity with real value in the marketplace," Gates writes.

Take a break from meat

Showering and hydration are hardly your main uses of water—but food is. The average American uses 7,500 liters of water each day, according to the U.N. If you're eating meat, your water usage shoots way up; a steak dinner for two requires 15,000 liters of water for the meat alone. Eating more meat and dairy has been the single greatest factor for water consumption in the past 30 years, says the group—so going vegetarian, even temporarily, can make a difference.

Wash your hands the right way

Only 5% of Americans do, according to a study of men using public restrooms. (If you need a refresher on proper technique, you should use soap and water and wash for at least 15 seconds.) Sounds gross—and it is a public health hazard, according to UNICEF, organizers of Global Handwashing Day, another water-related holiday worth celebrating. "Handwashing with soap prevents disease in a more straightforward and cost-effective way than any single vaccine," supporter UNICEF writes.

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Support a future female farmer

Most of the world's hungry are women, says the U.N.'s new report, and most don't own land—or even have time to make an income, since 25% of their day is spent collecting drinking water. "With equal access to resources and knowledge, female farmers, who account for the majority of all subsistence farmers, could produce enough additional food to reduce the number of the world’s hungry by 150 million," the report says. Investing in water and sanitation actually helps improve equality, which helps stimulate the economy—every dollar invested yields between $5-28, the UN estimates.

Give better water to the world

A new report from WaterAid America found that one in five babies born in the developing world dies during its first month of life because of a lack of clean water. And 35% of facilities in middle- and lower-income countries didn't have water and soap for hand-washing, another report from the World Health Organization found.

John Green, author of The Fault In Our Stars, recently teamed up with Bill Gates to raise money for clean, safe water in Ethiopia. You can donate to water.org here.

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