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Google's Robot Dog Brings Us One Step Closer to the End of Humanity

Feb 10, 2015

We have met the leader of the Rise of the Machines, and his name is Spot.

Google-owned Boston Dynamics released a YouTube video of its latest robotic endeavor Thursday, and the four-legged, 160 pound, mechanical canine is both borderline adorable and borderline terrifying.

Spot — a smaller version of the company's aptly named Big Dog — is capable of gracefully (for a robot) running up hills, maneuvering through rough terrain and climbing stairs. And he's quiet, so you might not see him coming.

The robot also has the ability to self-stabilize, which Boston Dynamics illustrates by video taping employees kicking him in the side. Come on guys, I know you've seen enough movies to know you shouldn't taunt the robots! This is how it all starts!

Granted, if Spot proves to be less vengeful and more benevolent, The Verge points out that he could be useful to assist with search and rescue missions and accessing disaster zones.

These Robots Have Their Own World Cup

Humanoid robots are seen during a photo opportunity at the Institute for Computer Science at the University of Bonn in Bonn July 3, 2014.
Humanoid robots are seen at the Institute for Computer Science at the University of Bonn in Bonn July 3, 2014.Ina Fassbender—Reuters
Humanoid robots are seen during a photo opportunity at the Institute for Computer Science at the University of Bonn in Bonn July 3, 2014.
Research associates Larry Vadakedathu, left, and Qin He work with one of their RoboCup entries, a 5-foot-tall metal humanoid named THOR (Tactical Hazardous Operations Robot), in the adult-size league at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on July 7, 2014.
Robocup Junior teams in RoboCup Robot Soccer Championship on July 21, 2014.
Members of the Rhoban project's team check functions of a humanoid robot at the LaBRI workshop in Talence, France on July 7, 2014.
People work on the software of humanoid robots during a photo opportunity at the Institute for Computer Science at the University of Bonn in Bonn, Germany on July 3, 2014.
Students at the University of Pennsylvania work with one of their RoboCup entries known as Nao in Philadelphia on July 7, 2014.
The fir first day of the RoboCup Robot Soccer Championship in João Pessoa, Brazil on July 21, 2014.
A participant from the Netherlands prepares his humanoid robot for a soccer match in the international robotics competition on April 10, 2014.
Humanoid robots play during a soccer match while visitors follow the competition in the international robotics competition, RoboCup Iran Open 2014, in Tehran, Iran on April 10, 2014.
Trophies won by humanoid robots at competitions are seen during a photo opportunity at the Institute for Computer Science at the University of Bonn in Bonn, Germany on July 3, 2014.
Humanoid robots are seen at the Institute for Computer Science at the University of Bonn in Bonn July 3, 2014.
Ina Fassbender—Reuters
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