A demonstrator holds up a pencil, which has become a symbol for the cartoonists and editors killed at Charlie Hebdo at Republique Square, Paris, before the start of a demonstration, Jan. 11, 2015.
A demonstrator holds up a pencil, which has become a symbol for the cartoonists and editors killed at Charlie Hebdo at Republique square, Paris, before the start of a demonstration, Jan. 11, 2015.  Laurent Cipriani—AP

42% of French Opposed to Charlie Hebdo’s Cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, Poll Finds

Jan 18, 2015

More than 4 in 10 French people believe Charlie Hebdo shouldn't publish cartoons depicting the prophet Muhammad, given that many Muslims find the images offensive, according to a recent poll by a French publication, published Sunday.

A survey conducted by Le Journal du Dimanche, a French weekly newspaper, presented participants with this information: "Some Muslims feel attacked or injured by the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad."

In the final tally of responses, 42% checked a box to indicate that the country should "consider these reactions and avoid publishing these cartoons," while 57% of respondents checked "we should ignore these reactions and continue to publish such cartoons." The remaining 1% checked "no opinion."

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Charlie Hebdo cover
In this cover, the newspaper called itself an irresponsible newspaper, and likening itself to a Neanderthal, claiming that the invention of humor is the process of adding fuel to the fire.Charlie Hebdo
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
Charlie Hebdo cover
In this cover, the newspaper called itself an irresponsible newspaper, and likening itself to a Neanderthal, claiming th
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The survey, which used a sample of over 1,000 French adults, also found that women and people under 35 were most sensitive to Muslim concerns.

Charlie Hebdo’s latest cover image controversially depicted the Prophet Muhammad in tears, holding a sign that reads "Je Suis Charlie," in defiance of the attacks on the magazine's office that left 12 dead. Despite the anti-Charlie rallies that the cover sparked from Muslim groups across the world, the issue sold out its five million copies.

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Aftenposten, Norway
Aftenposten, Norway
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[JDD]

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